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Chicken pox in dd's school, she *may* have it, should I send her in the am? what about ToT? - Page 5

post #81 of 156
momtoS,
I don't think siblings have to stay home if the are not symptomatic. Even with highly contagious illnesses exposure does not not mean infecton. When I had CP my sister didn't get it. My Mom was upset because she hoped my sister could get it out of the way. We were all exposed to a child with CP at school and not everyone got it.
post #82 of 156
Please don't.

Wanna know how I found out I was pregnant with DD? The boy I took care of (autism therapy) was sent to school and thence to my house by his mother who knew FULL WELL he had chicken pox, but decided to let someone else deal with it. I only found out he had them when I pulled his blanket off him after his nap and saw his tummy was covered with pox. When I rang his grandmother (primary caregiver), her first question was "You're not pregnant, are you?" I didn't think I was, but I took a test that night and... yup! Not knowing much about chicken pox I rang a doctor at the hospital to see if it'd be OK, and she gave me some doom-and-gloom scenario about how the baby would probably be damaged or die and I should "consider my options". So that was fun. Fortunately the second opinion I got assured me that it was unlikely I wasn't immune to it if I'd already had it, which calmed me down a bit. But I still had to wait a week for the blood tests to come back, confirming that I was indeed immune and that my baby wasn't going to be born with two heads.

I was livid with the mother anyway, because she had no idea whether I was immune to CP or not, or pregnant or not, and still couldn't be bothered to let me know her son was infectious. (Incidentally, the blood tests also confirmed I'm not immune to rubella despite being vaxed for it AND having had it... so you never know!) Luckily it only ruined the we're-having-a-baby excitement for a week; it could have ruined my daughter's life. I'm sorry to go all melodramatic on you, but CP is NOT just an easy little illness for everyone. Even having had it doesn't mean you're necessarily immune - I believe my doctor said it was 90% immunity after infection, which still leaves a hefty 10%.
post #83 of 156
Your argument is that "well, people are contagious before they know it, so I might as well be out contagious anyway."

What part of "It is different if you do not know you are sick" is so complicated? There's a huge difference between doing something because you honestly do not know you are doing it (exposing people to a disease before you become sick with it) and knowingly exposing people to a disease that you know you have.

You cannot know you're sick before you are sick. Once you DO know you're sick, the responsible thing is to not go around spreading what you have.

Now, in the case of "exposed to," its a judgement call. If you have the possibility of serious contact with a confirmed case, that would be different from casual contact with a possible case.

IN your case, if I wasn't sure that one sister had pox and the other sister was symptom free, I'd consider letting the symptom free one go. EXCEPT for the fairness issue of one child getting to go while the other doesn't. Honestly, wiht my kids and their interpersonal issues, I'd probably NOT let one sibling go while the other stayed home. I'd say "It looks from these spots like you both will be coming down with Pox soon, so we shouldn't go out." and then I'd offer an alternative, like having friends over, or something like taht.
post #84 of 156
I wouldn't take a child actually coming down with CP. It's contagious from the moment fever or spots appears (theoretically a day or two before, maybe), until the last spot crusts over. I also, though, would not keep kids who might have been exposed in the last few days from t-o-t or anything else.

CP shows up 10-21 days after exposure, and is not contagious until 8 days (for theoretical cases, none proven) after exposure. So... kid exposed to CP 4 days ago, not contagious, not a chance of it, not a theoretical but-maybe. (I would probably NOT tell people who are CP-freaked-out though, because they generally don't understand this concept.)
post #85 of 156
Please don't send her TOTing or send the sibilings to school. it can be quite serious for certain groups.
post #86 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
When was this? I grew up before MMR (I've had both measles and mumps...not rubella). When those diseases were in circulation, people stayed home, sure. It wasn't because they were infectious, though. People didn't even talk about that side of it much. They stayed home because they were sick. When I had mumps, I spent the entire day on the couch, dozing off regularly. Going to school wasn't an option. And, for all everybody stayed home, about 40% of my class was out sick with measles in 1984, so it still manages to circulate very thoroughly (when you figure that measles had also gone around when I was little, so some of us, including me, were already immune for the 10th grade epidemic).

I still have to remind myself of threads like this on a regular basis, so I don't do any of these things. It would never have occurred to me to keep a sick kid home on Hallowe'en, unless they were too sick to ToT. I stop and think about these threads every time my children are sick. It's still a strange mindset to me, but I am following it.
HEre's an interesting historical document:

http://books.google.com/books?id=0Og...age&q=&f=false

IT's a book of public health laws passed in the US by the states during 1915.

Flipping through it, I see state after state law requiring quarantine for measles, mumps, diptheria, chicken pox.

Check out page 188 and following. The state of Illinois required immediate reporting to the local health authorities of all cases of chicken pox. Placards were then affixed to each outside entrance of the house, 10x15 inches, declaring that there was pox within. The affected child was confined to that building for 2 weeks, or until skin was smooth. All other children in the family were confined to that building for 2 weeks from date of last exposure.

Quarantine for whooping cough was EIGHT weeks from first "whoop." Other children who had not had whooping cough were excluded from school and supposed to be kept home for 2 weeks.

Measles patients were quarantined for 14 days from the beginning of the disease, and were excluded from school for 3 weeks from the onset of disease.

This really is how infectious diseases were treated, prevaccinne and ESPECIALLY before antibiotics came along to deal with secondary bacterial infections. People treated these diseases very seriously -- not with the offhand "Oh, they were no big deal!!" that people seem to think now. It wasn't "Go about your business, everyone gets these diseases." People just didn't take their kids around infecting everyone so that their kids could "have fun." If you had somethign infectious, you were supposed to be home, getting better.

It is possible to eliminate some diseases with effective quarantine alone. New Zealand (or Australia, I forget) eliminated smallpox without vaccinations through rigourous quarantine programs.

PS: MMR, possibly separate, were all available by the time I was born in '69.
post #87 of 156
Although, having just read the whole thread... I would probably in this case email/call the parents at the school whose children have already been exposed to one another at school, and say "hey, we don't want to expose anyone new, but DDs really want to show off their costumes to their buddies. Can we stop by your house for T o T?" I bet most will figure the kids are already exposed so what's the difference? Plus it can become a group going to one another's houses where the germs have already been shared. You could even add a couple of family members/close friends, and make a list of the smaller number of houses you're going to go visit for T o T.

No one is exposed unknowingly, the kids get to T o T.

I know that you *might* randomly pass someone on the street while T o T, but you're not touching candy in a bowl they're going to get candy from, or anything, so honestly I think it would be fine.
post #88 of 156
Please keep her at home. My dd1 caught whooping cough from some one who knowingly brought their child out sick because they didn't want to miss a special event. Thank God it was only a mild case and dd2 didn't get it, but I still ended up keeping her at home for around a month just so I could be on the safe side with dd2.

My older siblings and I had CP in the early 80's and my poor mom didn't go anywhere from Oct. to Jan. My brother caught it right before Halloween, so my mom kept us all home just to be safe, my sister came down with it mid-Nov., so we missed Thanksgiving events, and then I didn't get it till mid-Dec., so she had to stay home with me during all the Christmas events. Yes it sucked, but that is what everyone did back then. If you know you are sick, stay at home.

I personally would keep the sibling at home, but I tend to be very cautious about stuff like that. I don't want to have to call people up and tell them that I exposed their child to an illness, especially if I knew there was a chance that my child might be in the begining stages of an illness.
post #89 of 156
No. CP is highly contagious and even though personally my own kids sailed through it with only minor discomfort that's not how it is for everyone. It would be irresponsible for you to take your daughter TOTing this year.
post #90 of 156
Thread Starter 
So.....I am trying to understand everyone's points. It is not okay to go ToT'ing even if I don't let dd touch anything. Or even walk up the steps.

BUT

I could invite people over to a pox party.....so I could invite x number of kids and they could get it, (both old and young) and before they get spots they could infect many many unknowing people.....but that would be okay because?????

or is it a rule if you have a pox party that all childrens stay home and have no contact with anyone for 21 days? I am only asking because I am not familiar with pox parties.......
post #91 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by momtoS View Post
Do you think I should keep her sister home too?
Well, if you're that certain she has it and is contagious, I would say yes, based on what you've said.

If you have a child that you KNOW is sick or that you purposefully and knowingly exposed to CP with the specific intention of getting them sick, then YES, they should be quarantined. It's a big deal to some people even if you don't care.
post #92 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
I still have to remind myself of threads like this on a regular basis, so I don't do any of these things. It would never have occurred to me to keep a sick kid home on Hallowe'en, unless they were too sick to ToT. I stop and think about these threads every time my children are sick. It's still a strange mindset to me, but I am following it.
I'm just curious, what would qualify as "too sick?" Like they didn't feel well enough or do you mean some specific symptoms?
post #93 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by momtoS View Post
So.....I am trying to understand everyone's points. It is not okay to go ToT'ing even if I don't let dd touch anything. Or even walk up the steps.

BUT

I could invite people over to a pox party.....so I could invite x number of kids and they could get it, (both old and young) and before they get spots they could infect many many unknowing people.....but that would be okay because?????

or is it a rule if you have a pox party that all childrens stay home and have no contact with anyone for 21 days? I am only asking because I am not familiar with pox parties.......
The only people I know who have done pox parties are homeschoolers, and yeah, that's pretty much what they did.

At a pox party, everyone there *wants* to get them. They know what they're signing up for. Ideally, I'd talk with the people who come about not going around spreading pox willynilly to those who might not be so excited to get it naturally. But at least you know that your conscious exposures were willing.

What you're proposing doing is like having a pox party for your whole neighborhood -- but not actually telling them its a pox party until the end of the party when you hand out the goody bags.
post #94 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by momtoS View Post
So.....I am trying to understand everyone's points. It is not okay to go ToT'ing even if I don't let dd touch anything. Or even walk up the steps.

BUT

I could invite people over to a pox party.....so I could invite x number of kids and they could get it, (both old and young) and before they get spots they could infect many many unknowing people.....but that would be okay because?????

or is it a rule if you have a pox party that all childrens stay home and have no contact with anyone for 21 days? I am only asking because I am not familiar with pox parties.......

I've only known a couple of people who went to pox parties, and yes they did plan to stay at home for about a month following the exposure.
post #95 of 156
Quote:
I could invite people over to a pox party.....so I could invite x number of kids and they could get it, (both old and young) and before they get spots they could infect many many unknowing people.....but that would be okay because?????
People *choose*to go to a pox party. People don't choose to have individuals knowing they're activley infected with X,Y,Z disease knocking on their door. Sure, we all roll the dice every day in the general poplice, but if my little ones are sick, I don't think I have the right to take away that CHOICE of exposure from others.

We're talking about trick or treating here, right? Not showing up at the ER to get a blood transfusion. It's difficult for kiddos to be sad, but there are other "treats" we can avail them of to alleve the disappointment ....
post #96 of 156
Thread Starter 
Okay...I didn't know that pox party attendees typically stay home for a month afterwards....that makes sense I guess.
post #97 of 156
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueStateMama View Post
People *choose*to go to a pox party. People don't choose to have individuals knowing they're activley infected with X,Y,Z disease knocking on their door. Sure, we all roll the dice every day in the general poplice, but if my little ones are sick, I don't think I have the right to take away that CHOICE of exposure from others.

We're talking about trick or treating here, right? Not showing up at the ER to get a blood transfusion. It's difficult for kiddos to be sad, but there are other "treats" we can avail them of to alleve the disappointment ....
I didn't know that people that attended pox parties stayed home for a month following the party to avoid infecting unknowing people....I have never really heard of a pox party....
post #98 of 156
Thread Starter 
We have been invited to trick or treat a few people houses that are okay with it. Or have chicken pox themselves.
post #99 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by momtoS View Post
We have been invited to trick or treat a few people houses that are okay with it. Or have chicken pox themselves.
Hey, that's the PERFECT solution! Have fun!
post #100 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by momtoS View Post
So.....I am trying to understand everyone's points. It is not okay to go ToT'ing even if I don't let dd touch anything. Or even walk up the steps.

BUT

I could invite people over to a pox party.....so I could invite x number of kids and they could get it, (both old and young) and before they get spots they could infect many many unknowing people.....but that would be okay because?????

or is it a rule if you have a pox party that all childrens stay home and have no contact with anyone for 21 days? I am only asking because I am not familiar with pox parties.......
Yes. I took DS to a pox party earlier this year. He didn't end up getting pox, but we stayed away from public areas until we knew that was the case. It's the responsible thing to do. Obviously I don't have a problem with intentionally exposing my children, but it's not a decision I have any right to make for others, especially with a disease that can be so devastating to certain groups of people.
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