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"Alcohol is a drug" - Page 2

post #21 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by tanyam926 View Post
I think that when adults try to indoctrinate children w/ideas that are overstated (basically using scare tactics) we really lose credibility w/our kids.
This is exactly why so many college and some times high school kids go way way overboard as soon as they get a chance to have alcohol.

It works so much better when adults are honest and talk about how a little alcohol can help one unwind in the evening, and occassionally it's fun to get buzzed. How alcohol effects you differently if you have eaten a lot or a little. How people gradually build up a tolerance and one shouldn't go all out the first few times drinking. How it feels right before you go from having enough to too much. Etc.
post #22 of 62
I think one positive thing you can take away from this is that these programs, even if they don't really help the way people like them to, at least enabled you to start the dialog with your child, which will help.
post #23 of 62
Well, sure alcohol is a drug. So is tylenol, asprin, caffeine, sugar...

With our kids we talk about the difference between responsible USE and ABUSE.

Having a glass of wine with dinner is drug use. Drinking a bottle is abuse. Taking a painkiller because a doctor prescribes it post surgery is use. Take oxycotin because it makes you feel funny is abuse.

Kids are smart enough to know the difference. I agree that the DRUGS ARE BAD kinds of messages are pointless and irresponsible on the part of adults--and hypocritical. But I do agree that it is a good thing to start the conversation.

But the conversation is going to come up, anyway. My son asked me about opium and opium dens after reading about it in a Tintin comic book at the age of 5 . So we talked about illegal drugs and harmful drugs like opium. But we also talked about how the same drug can be made into morphine, which can help people who are suffering a lot of pain--but it just depends on how it is used.

Honestly, in this day and age, I have a greater fear of a child abusing prescription drugs because you can't smells it on their breath, you don't need any paraphernalia to consume the drugs, and they're 'legal.' Alcohol seems tame compared to some of the pills kids buy and sell at schools these days.
post #24 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmel23 View Post
I have a greater fear of a child abusing prescription drugs
We've had some great conversations about prescription drug abuse grow out of watching House. The concept that legal drug use can still be drug abuse is not beyound my middle schoolers.
post #25 of 62
Reading all of this with interest as a mom to a 4YO and a teacher to 14,15,16 YOs. Obviously, to me, these programs don't work. Otherwise, we wouldn't have the rampant binge drinking I hear about a lot of the kids participating in, even as young as 8th grade. (Obviously, the sex ed isn't working either, since I've had a pregnant student in my class every year since I started teaching here at this solidly middle class suburban school...)
post #26 of 62
Haven't read the other responses, but I agree with you, op.

We went through the same thing last year with our son. I also had to explain why the drug store isn't some horrible terrible thing because it had "drug" in the name.
post #27 of 62
I did think they were supposed to get your signed permission to "treat" your child behaviorally / psychologically. Which is what drug programs are.
post #28 of 62
Thread Starter 
Nope, no permission slip here, I'm not even sure what was taught, but I am going to ask.
post #29 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post
I did think they were supposed to get your signed permission to "treat" your child behaviorally / psychologically. Which is what drug programs are.
here they use permission slips.

However, if I had opted my 6th grader DD out of sex miseducation, she would have spent 1 hour a week in study hall with all the boys from not only her class room, but another class room as well. (They combine the classes and the boy have miseducation one day while the girls have study hall in the other classroom, and the next day the girls have miseducation while the boys have study hall in the other room).

I left it up to her, and she decided to go because there is a party for the kids who get enough *points* during the 6 week program. I figured that since in a few years I'll be trusting her to make far bigger decisions for herself, I could trust her with one.
post #30 of 62
When I was in the AF I was chosen for the random drug test and met a women who had to be there every month. Why? Because her dd told the teacher her parents "did drugs"....they were smokers of legal cigarettes.


My dh started drinking at 16...because he lived in Italy...and that is the legal age there to be served in public. He was really annoyed to come back to the states at 19 and not be able to drink.
post #31 of 62
I didn't read most of this thread because I am too impatient--I have to get this out.

When I was 8 my uncle died of a drug overdose. My parents simply told me he died because of drugs, and that was it. But somehow in my head I determined that drugs = all illegal drugs, alcohol, and cigarettes. I developed a bit of a complex about it. I have never drank or smoked (tobacco or pot). In college I was a little obnoxious about it. Later, as a rational adult who is totally for pot legalization and in theory has no issues at all with people drinking responsibly or smoking pot, I tried a few sips of wine and found it dusgusting. When people close to me were smoking pot responsibly I had to go through a lot of emotional baggage to be able to accept it. That kinda sucked--that I theoritically had no issue with it at all, but had all this childhood fear and sadness linked to it.

My point? These anti-drug programs really upset me. I teach middle school and I would never over generalize like that. I know first grade is different, but they deserve to be given honest facts at an age-appropriate level. I wasn't, and I am still a little upset about it.
post #32 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmeline II View Post
My dh started drinking at 16...because he lived in Italy...and that is the legal age there to be served in public. He was really annoyed to come back to the states at 19 and not be able to drink.
In Wisconsin, it is legal for parents to let their children consume alcoholic beverages as long as the parents are with them from the moment they ingest to the moment their blood alcohol is back at zero (essentially, all night). Mine occasionally let me have a glass of wine or beer. Quite a shock when I went away to college in MN... they came to visit me and took me out to dinner, and it surprised all of us that I couldn't drink with their permission. Didn't realize I grew up in a tiny oasis of semi-sanity.
post #33 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmeline II View Post
When I was in the AF I was chosen for the random drug test and met a women who had to be there every month. Why? Because her dd told the teacher her parents "did drugs"....they were smokers of legal cigarettes.
Ok yeah this one scares me. DH and I are smokers (not by the kids of course but they certainly know that we do). With the rising costs of cigarettes and the new chemical ridden paper they've started using, we switched to buying legal, prepackaged bags of "cigarette tobacco" and filters, and have a little machine where we make our own. It's a lot cheaper and not *as* awful for us (though we're not mitigating the risks). I can see now one of our children telling their teacher that their parents smoke and they make their own smokes! That could get ugly and I can totally see how it would happen. Maybe we need to mention this to offset any misunderstandings!
post #34 of 62
It's a similar problem many Native Americans have with the anti-tobacco messages. They make NO distinction between special occasion, responsible usage and lighting up chemically treated cigs 10 times a day. Tobacco is "evil". But caffeine, that's just fine.
As a teenager, I realized what a waste the "Red-Ribbon" thing is. One of my friends threw regular "bring your own" parties. The Sat. during red-ribbon week, you got in for "free" if you were wearing your ribbon. Yeah... that program was really effective for us.
post #35 of 62
I know of a few times where CPS was called after the kids were told that alcohol and cigarettes are drugs and the kids said that their parents did drugs. I think there's a reason for these things to be said but hey, what do I know?
post #36 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by onelilguysmommy View Post
I know of a few times where CPS was called after the kids were told that alcohol and cigarettes are drugs and the kids said that their parents did drugs. I think there's a reason for these things to be said but hey, what do I know?
I could see DS telling someone I do drugs right now. I take a thyroid pill everyday, and I've always been very clear with him that it is a drug (while explaining that drugs are made special for only the person whose name is written on the label, and you should never take someoneelse's pills, yada-yada-yada.) I do this just in case he ever gets his hands on a pill (we are careful to put mine up and away, but you never know.)

So he could indeed say "mommy takes drugs." Of course grandpa takes a lot of drugs.
post #37 of 62
A good buddy of mine has always rolled his own cigarettes. When his niece started school, she took popcorn in a fold top plastic baggie for her snack. When she was finished, she licked the top of the baggie and rolled it shut, so the leftover popcorn wouldn't fall out. The teacher noticed, asked where she learned that maneuver, and when she said, "Uncle Jeremy does this when he smokes on our back porch", CPS got called.

That family was .
post #38 of 62
Thread Starter 
I know, it's ridiculous! This is exactly what I am saying.

The whole point of the program is to brainwash kids into being against drugs right? Well, kids who choose not to do drugs don't do it bc they hear it a million times but bc they have a personal reason not to. (Family experience, a real understanding of the dangers, etc.).

So it's not even about the benefits outweighing the costs. There has to be other people at the school who also think it's a waste of time. I say we open a dialogue, and throughout childhood and adolescence keep that dialogue open. Give information, answer questions, help them think about the consequences, give them tools to make the right decision or to ask for help if they have made an unhealthy choice.

I am going to call the school so I can get more info about the drug free program and the cirriculum.
post #39 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by onelilguysmommy View Post
I know of a few times where CPS was called after the kids were told that alcohol and cigarettes are drugs and the kids said that their parents did drugs. I think there's a reason for these things to be said but hey, what do I know?
A reason for what things to be said? You mean, for teachers to talk about drugs, for children to talk about how they now think their (cigarette-smoking, alcohol-drinking) parents are on drugs, or for CPS to get called because parents smoke cigarettes and drink alcohol?

A woman in my neighborhood said her son (9 or 10 I think) got in trouble when his class made paper pumpkins and he decorated a pumpkin with a pipe and the word "weed" coming out of it. She said neither she nor her husband smoked pot, and she's not exactly sure where her son learned the word "weed" -- and it was upsetting to her that the teacher seemed to think there was only one way for a child that young to know the word "weed" in that context.

I think some teachers don't live in the real world, if they get so bent-out-of-shape and call CPS over stuff like this. And what about the poor children who really are being abused, while social workers are wasting their time making non-abusive parents pee in a cup? How silly and sad!
post #40 of 62
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