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How about another Classical/CM thread? - Page 5

post #81 of 212
I am a bit late, but we are also planning on a CM/Classical style curriculum. I had originally been thinking of a classical model, but I really love the CM stuff for younger kids (I haven't really got to look much at the later years yet.)

We plan to more or less follow the Ambleside curriculum, which will I think be a good fit for our family.

That being said, dd1 will only be 5 in January, so we are not really into much formal learning yet. WE also have a new baby due then, so I expect we will not get into starting until September of maybe even Christmas next year.

At the moment, I am looking to collect up materials.

On another note, I noticed some commenting on having the "Formidable List" done by age 6. I've joined the Ambleside year 0 group on Yahoo, and the feeling there seems to be that the list is meant to be an ideal, rather than a minimum, and is probably meant to be completed by age 7, not age 6.
post #82 of 212
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluegoat View Post

On another note, I noticed some commenting on having the "Formidable List" done by age 6. I've joined the Ambleside year 0 group on Yahoo, and the feeling there seems to be that the list is meant to be an ideal, rather than a minimum, and is probably meant to be completed by age 7, not age 6.
That's really good to know- thanks! and welcome to the thread.
post #83 of 212
I have a question:

has anyone takent eh "Formidable List" (by age 6) and re-written it? to be either more specific to their family or ...

I am thinking i want to do that ..some of stuff is not relavant to us -- like the stuff in French

ANy one do this?

Aimee
post #84 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma Aimee View Post
I have a question:

has anyone takent eh "Formidable List" (by age 6) and re-written it? to be either more specific to their family or ...

I am thinking i want to do that ..some of stuff is not relavant to us -- like the stuff in French

ANy one do this?

Aimee
I am in the process of doing that RIGHT now!

I will share our list when I am done. I also am rewriting the 12 year old list and making it be a 10 year old list.
post #85 of 212
Also, my take is that the 6 yr list is for the year that they are 6, so 6-7 Not by their 6th birthday.
post #86 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma Aimee View Post
I don't see why either has to be Christian (or any other faith for that matter).

We are barely stih reading .. many of the books and "plan' out there for Classical ARE Christian, but i don't see any reason they would have to be. i believe there are several moms here that "more more secular" the plans they follow
Even the "christian" ones I think could easily be adapted to be secular. THey have many myths, fairy tales and such. You could just remove the church history and Bible if you choose.

Kinda funny...I am readapting the programs because I do not believe they are Christian enough So to me many of them seem pretty secular in nature
post #87 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelBee View Post
Also, my take is that the 6 yr list is for the year that they are 6, so 6-7 Not by their 6th birthday.
I didn't think of THAT too --

that IS a good point
post #88 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelBee View Post
Even the "christian" ones I think could easily be adapted to be secular. THey have many myths, fairy tales and such. You could just remove the church history and Bible if you choose.

Kinda funny...I am readapting the programs because I do not believe they are Christian enough So to me many of them seem pretty secular in nature
Me too

I find it intresting what others find "strongly Christian" or whatever when frequently can see some Christan tone to it, but not to the extent a non-Christian might. Intresting to me the differnt takes on the same thing.
post #89 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainbowmoon View Post
I am drawn to CE an CM. Are you able to use these approaches and remain secular? (I guess we are already kind of doing this but not following any particular curriculum just yet)
I guess this depends on what you mean by "remain secular"

If you mean "retain your current religious beliefs or lack thereof and not convert to Christianity or any other religion", then it's totally possible.

If you mean "avoid exposing my child to Christian beliefs and values", it's going to be harder. A lot of older (like before 1960 or so) Western children's literature assumes a basic Christian worldview and education on the part of the reader and promotes Christian values, even if the story isn't intended as religious propoganda, and this literature tends to be what these curriculums incorporate.

I'm finding that I feel my son is in need of a basic introduction to Christianity and Bible stories in order to have better context for some of what we're reading, and we'll probably incorporate that within the next year. But I do feel that this can be done in a secular manner (just as teaching Egyptian/Greek/Roman Myths isn't inherently going to turn a kid into a follower of those religions), and is probably helpful in dealing with society as a whole, not just curriculums. I mean, walk into any store this month, and they'll be playing songs about Jesus and his miraculous birth

We're using Ambleside Online and TWTM, and so far haven't had any trouble secularizing it. If i feel something is too religious, we replace it with something else that fits that niche, or just disregard it. Since we're drawing from multiple sources and have more than enough to do already (and aren't paying for resources we're not going to use!), I don't feel bad about just dropping things that don't work for us.

DS is only first grade, so take that with a grain of salt - it could get more difficult to secularize in future years. However, I know there are secular CM, Ambleside, and WTM resources out there, and that people use them in a secular manner all the way through.

My general feeling, as a secular homeschooler, is that so many of the resources out there are Christian in nature that avoiding the religious curriculums entirely is throwing the baby out with the bathwater. I do think special care needs to be taken when looking at prepackaged curriculums (where you may be paying for a bunch of material that won't work for you), as well as History and Science. Those are two subjects where I feel that Christian curriculums occasionally greatly differ from what I would prefer to teach.
post #90 of 212
what basic Phonics program did people like .. without hand writting ... i know Theo's fine motor is not ready to write anything, but by the the summer I'd like to start simple phonics with him -- but i am so confused by all teh programs ...
post #91 of 212
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma Aimee View Post
what basic Phonics program did people like .. without hand writting ... i know Theo's fine motor is not ready to write anything, but by the the summer I'd like to start simple phonics with him -- but i am so confused by all teh programs ...
The Ordinary Parent's guide to Teaching Reading and Hooked on Phonics both require and need no handwriting. McGuffey's Readers also don't.
post #92 of 212
My son is in Ambleside Yr 3. I don't feel that it's overly Christian year.
We are Christian's and I add Bible and devotional books as well as Scripture memory.

I can think that The Landing of the Pilgrims talks a lot about their religion.
Christiana's Journey --2nd Pilgrim's Progress

Trial and Triumph
I think it would be easy to pull those out and add something in.


Lots of the books talk about the people's religions because so many things depended on what religion they were. I don't see them as trying to convert though.
post #93 of 212
post #94 of 212
I wanted to talk about A Formidable List (for children of 6).

I know my DS1 is not likly to make it by 6 even without his SN I think it is a bit much for a ACTIVE 6 yo boy ..

but i am jsut wondering, did thoese of you who worked on it ... work on it intentionally, or just let things go and then check in every so often and say "oh yep he/ she can do THAT".

did you set out with it as a goal, as something you worked towards?

post #95 of 212
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma Aimee View Post
I wanted to talk about A Formidable List (for children of 6).

I know my DS1 is not likly to make it by 6 even without his SN I think it is a bit much for a ACTIVE 6 yo boy ..

but i am jsut wondering, did thoese of you who worked on it ... work on it intentionally, or just let things go and then check in every so often and say "oh yep he/ she can do THAT".

did you set out with it as a goal, as something you worked towards?

Well- it's not that it has to be achieved by the sixth birthday- but the seventh. If that helps. I think much of it is reasonable- boy or girl. There's lots of active girls out there.
A lot of it seems to happen just by schooling, not by purposefully following the list.
post #96 of 212
Thanks for bringing up the Formidable List- I forgot about it, and it was nice to review what we've done and be reminded of what we should still work on with him (my DS just turned 7). I bring it to my homeschool review and the reviewers always love it!!

Ok- just got WTM and am really overwhelmed!!! Would love to hear others' thoughts. I see the purpose behind all the different areas they recommend, and it all seems important, but I can't see how I'd fit all that in! We have 3 school days per week just me and DS 1:1, and 2 days with all 3 kids, which are impossible to do academic work. On the 3-kid days we do trips, loosely do FIAR, PE, and even First Language Lessons which my 4 yo also enjoys.

We are doing Explode the Code for phonics/reading/writing practice which he enjoys, just started FLL which they love, for narration, poem memorization, parts of speech, etc. And reading aloud lots, I try to make it good literature although it's definitely not all focused on the classics or periods of history like WTM suggests. We are doing SotW maybe 2x/week.

In the new year, I am going to spend some more time on having him read aloud to me ( he is still a pretty beginning reader), and some copywork. Plus we still have to fit in math, science, and art class and piano (which he loves)-

My question: we've not doing spelling or a handwriting program, per se. It does seem important do learn the rules of spelling, and honestly my education wasn't good enough that I'm able to explain it all to him. But with what we're already doing, and the limited time we have, how can I fit that all in????? What are the priorities, when it seems like there are so many different areas of language arts? Also keeping in mind, he is a very young 7 yr old, and still needs a lot of help, and most work takes him quite a lot of time and effort, so I don't want to overwhelm or exhaust him.
post #97 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awaken View Post
Thanks for bringing up the Formidable List- I forgot about it, and it was nice to review what we've done and be reminded of what we should still work on with him (my DS just turned 7). I bring it to my homeschool review and the reviewers always love it!!

Ok- just got WTM and am really overwhelmed!!! Would love to hear others' thoughts. I see the purpose behind all the different areas they recommend, and it all seems important, but I can't see how I'd fit all that in! We have 3 school days per week just me and DS 1:1, and 2 days with all 3 kids, which are impossible to do academic work. On the 3-kid days we do trips, loosely do FIAR, PE, and even First Language Lessons which my 4 yo also enjoys.

We are doing Explode the Code for phonics/reading/writing practice which he enjoys, just started FLL which they love, for narration, poem memorization, parts of speech, etc. And reading aloud lots, I try to make it good literature although it's definitely not all focused on the classics or periods of history like WTM suggests. We are doing SotW maybe 2x/week.

In the new year, I am going to spend some more time on having him read aloud to me ( he is still a pretty beginning reader), and some copywork. Plus we still have to fit in math, science, and art class and piano (which he loves)-

My question: we've not doing spelling or a handwriting program, per se. It does seem important do learn the rules of spelling, and honestly my education wasn't good enough that I'm able to explain it all to him. But with what we're already doing, and the limited time we have, how can I fit that all in????? What are the priorities, when it seems like there are so many different areas of language arts? Also keeping in mind, he is a very young 7 yr old, and still needs a lot of help, and most work takes him quite a lot of time and effort, so I don't want to overwhelm or exhaust him.
I certainly don't know My two are YOUNG.

but my THOUGHT on the matter -- from reading WTM (2x) and reading here, and my own thoughts on what i want to do with ours is this

combine spelling and phonics. Basically -- to me -- the most importnat things is the RULES more than learning a list of words a week. and the spelling rules ARE phonics. so phonice work for reading, is spelling also --

i agree my education was not all it should have been -- i am an exce;llent reader but my actual phonics and thus spelling suck big time -- so it is something i have going to have to learn / relearn.

can spelling be added to phonices / seen as part of phonics ... with discussion of buiilding words bit just decoding them? also there is room to "add" spelling in more once DS is moving forward in phonics and reading more?

that would be my thought.
post #98 of 212
I posted our plans for our Kindergarten Spring 2010 semester here:
http://satorismiles.com/curriculum/k...m-spring-2010/

I suppose most of her work by now would be considered first grade, so those of you with PreK/K/1 might be be interested to look at it. Since we've been doing this for a year now, I know my daughter and my learning and teaching styles much better, so that makes things easier to plan!

Spelling and handwriting? We love those subjects! My daughter is definitely a writer now. We started handwriting with HWT at age 4, and then All About Spelling at 4.5. I should post some updated examples of her handwriting and spelling, I usually do that every few months as things change so quickly!
post #99 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by dotnetdiva View Post
I posted our plans for our Kindergarten Spring 2010 semester here:
http://satorismiles.com/curriculum/k...m-spring-2010/

I suppose most of her work by now would be considered first grade, so those of you with PreK/K/1 might be be interested to look at it. Since we've been doing this for a year now, I know my daughter and my learning and teaching styles much better, so that makes things easier to plan!

Spelling and handwriting? We love those subjects! My daughter is definitely a writer now. We started handwriting with HWT at age 4, and then All About Spelling at 4.5. I should post some updated examples of her handwriting and spelling, I usually do that every few months as things change so quickly!
i looove your blog and will have to check it out




















and feel like a slacker again
post #100 of 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awaken View Post
Ok- just got WTM and am really overwhelmed!!! Would love to hear others' thoughts. I see the purpose behind all the different areas they recommend, and it all seems important, but I can't see how I'd fit all that in! We have 3 school days per week just me and DS 1:1, and 2 days with all 3 kids, which are impossible to do academic work. On the 3-kid days we do trips, loosely do FIAR, PE, and even First Language Lessons which my 4 yo also enjoys.
One thing to keep in mind about WTM is that the author readily admits that few, if any, families (including her own) actually do everything listed, and that the daily schedules were included to satisfy the publisher and aren't realistic. She also talks about emphasizing the basics (reading instruction and basic math) during the early years, and adding more in as the child gets older and increases in self-sufficiency and attention.
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