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Would you let an 8.5yo have their own email account? - Page 2

post #21 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma Aimee View Post
kids are not kids long enough these days.

AImee
I'm curious--what is it about an email account that shortens childhood?

I see email as just another mode of communication. At that age, I used snail mail and the phone. This generation has other options like email and texting. How does it take away from childhood?
post #22 of 54
i have no family near me (on my side that is... i could trip over my MIL or SIL's house, lol). for me, emailing is the same thing as sending letters snail mail... it's not like she is writing to people i don't know or receiving email from strangers. people aren't requesting to be her "friend" & she doesn't receive spam, because we don't give her account info out. i certainly don't feel she is less of a child because of it, but rather she enjoys sending my family notes, pictures, etc. equally, we enjoy receiving notes from them via email. my mom still sends cards and calls everyday...but email is simply another way to keep in touch, ykwim?
post #23 of 54
This is an interesting question, and not something I have ever thought about since my 8yo and 5yo really don't use the computer at all. I don't see anything inherently wrong with a child protected account. It would be fun to converse with grandparents and perhaps encourage today's version of letter writing. My only concern, for us, would be that it might be a motivation for them to be on the computer everyday, and I am happy now that they are not interested in computer games and such. But, I am sure there will come a time when they will become interested in the computer, and when that happens, email seems one of the better online options.
post #24 of 54
I was actually going to open an account for my son (he is 5) to use. We will be doing it together, but I think it will be a neat experience for him. We live very far from any family, and it will be a fun way to keep in touch with those he loves...he can send pictures and write them letters, etc. Of course, we still do good old snail mail, but this is just another avenue of communication for us.

I want to find one that I can control what goes in and out, so he won't be getting porn spam and the like, or e-mail from predators. What are some children's email sites? And are they free?

Thanks
post #25 of 54
My 6 yo daughter has a yahoo email account that she looks at about once or twice a month. She will read a few short emails from her loved ones (grandmas, aunts, mommy, and daddy) and peck out a few sweet messages back. She feels very proud to be able to compose a message and tell people she loves them in that way, and it helps my reluctant writer break out of her shell and try to write words on her own. I don't see any problem with it.

However, I would not let her on a social networking site for many years. Probably at least in her early teens.
post #26 of 54
My youngest got her e-mail address at age 3. It comes through my e-mail client into a separate folder, so I have full access. Obviously the risk is of spam with inappropriate content, but because everything filters past my eyes first, that's not a problem. I have good spam filters, and just skim things visually in her folder.

She's a prolific communicator, both through snail-mail and e-mail. She's six now and really enjoys having her own e-mail account. It has been wonderful for her writing skills.

Miranda
post #27 of 54
My dd is still a baby (but I plan to homeschool someday so I lurk), but your post made me smile. My dd got her first email account when we named her, at 20 weeks gestation. I didn't want anyone else to snap up hername@gmail.com! When she was born, she got an email from my friend's baby, who was, I think, 4 months old at the time, from hisname@gmail.com. All of her email goes to my inbox too, though. I'm glad she has it so she can keep up with her cousins and such when she's older.
post #28 of 54
My DDs who are 10 and 12 have had email accounts for a few years now (since they were 7 and 9, I'd guess). My 6yo DS has recently began reading and writing and has expressed interest in having his own account. I don't see any problem with it. It's a great way for them to stay in touch with friends and relatives in other states. I can't imagine keeping that from them.

To those of you who are opposed to children having email accounts, help me understand what the risks are? I could see potential problems if the were emailing strangers, but that has yet to happen. What am I overlooking?
post #29 of 54
My 8.5 yo has her own email account that she uses on "her" computer (a laptop that was handed down to her). I started out with the strictest controls (i.e. copies of all emails coming to me) but decided it wasn't needed and that it was overly intrusive--I don't need to be monitoring every conversation that she's having with a friend. I have full access to her computer and her account, and I informally (i.e. looking over her shoulder) monitor her email use.

As a child who's been reluctant to write, this has been a fun way to do more writing and stay in touch with family who are far and near. She and I even email each other. It's hard for me to see how this is potentially damaging to her or could somehow make her grow up too fast.

That being said, I am extremely strict about use of the internet, which is still 100% monitored. On her computer, she can only visit sites that I/we have bookmarked, which requires my password. The web, to me, is an entirely different beast than email.
post #30 of 54
If my 10 year old asked, I'd say yes. I think it would be fine. Set it up yourself and tell them the truth. You'll watch the account and know the password and will check up on them. If they are emailing family and friends, it's a great mode of communication and excellent typing practice haha
post #31 of 54
Thread Starter 
The main reason I want to let him have one is for his writing skills. Handwriting is very hard for him, but he constantly wants to write letters to friends and ends up asking me to do it. While I want to continue to work on his handwriting, I thought that letting him have his own email would enable him to work on his other writing skills. Also, he's in a phase of wanting to feel really independent, so I thought something like this might also help with that.

There are free sites, but the one I was thinking about was www.zoobuh.com. It's $30/yr, but I like the safety precautions.
post #32 of 54
DD1 has one. The only ppl she has as contacts are family- her cousin, aunt, and grandparents. She enjoys getting mail from them, and it gives grandparents a chance to send her things they think she would find cool, such as pics of bugs from her grandpa
post #33 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by SagMom View Post
I'm curious--what is it about an email account that shortens childhood?

I see email as just another mode of communication. At that age, I used snail mail and the phone. This generation has other options like email and texting. How does it take away from childhood?
I wrote snail mail letters too -- i have boxes of them saved.

but there is no danger to a child writting a letter, putting it in an envlope and mailing it to a buddy -- then getting a letter in retrun in the maiolbox.


the internet and coputers in all their glory -- i love mine, i am here -- have a alot of too it ---

type letters and mail them.

write letters

but the net is a dangerous place.

part of protecting childhood -- imho -- is protectiong them from tempation, and keep ing them chilren.

they do not cell phone, text messaging, and e-mail.

JMHO
post #34 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by notjustmamie View Post
Well, my daughter has had "her own" account since she was about a year old, but she doesn't really use it yet. All the messages are forwarded to my account.

I think 8.5 is old enough to have an account of his own, especially if it has limited access and you're getting copies of any messages he sends and receives.
I got Lina's when she was like a week old. She doesn't get any mail at all there, though.
post #35 of 54
And if you don't sign up for anything, you won't get anything. My gmail account is still spam free because for random stuff I use my yahoo account. Lina's gmail is empty except for the welcome message because it's never used.
post #36 of 54
I don't get the argument about email making kids not be kids. My grandparents in law didn't get email until they were retired (my own grandparents never got email), my parents, in-laws, aunts, and uncles didn't get email until they were adults, I didn't get email until I was 12. Because the technology wasn't really there before that. I was 16 before my parents got a modem and I had email access at home, before that it was only at school and when I was 12 was the first year the school had the computers for people to have email addresses.

Kids aren't getting email at 6, 7, 8 these days because they're growing up too fast (as opposed to some of the clothing lines marketed for kids ) they're getting them because computers are so available now they can be put in the hands of kids without freaking out that they'll (the computers) get broken.

A hundred years ago no one would get a 5 year old a bicycle. Too expensive, not sized for them, and of course a 5 year old could never ever use something so complicated to coordinate.
post #37 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma Aimee View Post
but the net is a dangerous place.

JMHO
Thanks for explaining.

I haven't found it to be dangerous--at least, not any more dangerous than any other part of their worlds. They've learned ways to be safe online just like they've learned to be safe using knives or crossing the street or climbing trees.

I guess it all depends on your view of the world.
post #38 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by SagMom View Post
Thanks for explaining.

I haven't found it to be dangerous--at least, not any more dangerous than any other part of their worlds. They've learned ways to be safe online just like they've learned to be safe using knives or crossing the street or climbing trees.

I guess it all depends on your view of the world.
ITA. My kids are 12, 9 & 7 and have all had email accounts since they were 4 or 5. The younger ones pretty much just talk to grandma and grandpa. All 3 use their accounts to forward me homeschool reports. My oldest uses his email to communicate with friends, family and his teachers (he attends and online school).
post #39 of 54
My 6 year old and 10 year old both have email accounts. My 10 year old has a Facebook account (actually it is really mine but he uses it). It has the highest level of security and he only has family and very close friends who mostly live abroad on it.

We also have Glubble for all of us, which is a family style message board and its private.

I don't worry so much about their privacy, we have our computers set up so that I can see exactly what my kids are doing at any given time. I love them having access to their friends and family online, it helps with their spelling, punctuation, grammar and sentence structure. Its also another good social outlet.

My 4 year old sometimes does puzzles online, he is a jigsaw puzzle wizard doing up to 100 piece puzzles (a skill developed primarily on the computer). My 6 year old is just starting to type more, so he is getting lots of spelling practice. They are all extremely computer savvy and my 10 year old has been programming for over a year.

Online access has been such a great educational/homeschooling tool for our family.
post #40 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma Aimee View Post
I am a firm believer in protecting childhood, and protecting children and keeping them children.... <snip>

IMO there is no one an 8 or 9 or 10 year old needs to e-mail.
You could just as easily say "there is no one an 8 or 9 or 10 year old needs to write letters to." Or "there is no reason why a child needs to play in sandboxes." And it would be true.

But good heavens, why not? What's the danger? Sandboxes are fun. Writing a letter or an e-mail to your cousins in England. How does this particular activity (e-mailing) cut childhood short?

Miranda

(mom to a 11-year-old who is still very much enamoured of Playmobil and sandboxes despite having typed many e-mails over the years)
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