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Vaxing a child with diabetes? - Page 5

post #81 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThereseReich View Post
Advertising is only one reason. There are still conflicts of interest. And the journals still have to abide by their Allopathic medical paradigm, which supports vaccines. Readers would think they are crazy if they started publishing anti-vaccines articles. So the journals are stuck with supporting only that one medical model.


I said I don't trust peer-reviewed studies from scientific medical journals. Not trusting them doesn't mean that I'm against each and every one of them. My point is that they are commonly not as truthful and not as unbiased as most people believe them to be. I'm always open to reading new things, such as these peer reviewed studies, but when there are sources like Tenpenny and Miller who say that vaccines can cause diabetes vs. journals who say vaccines don't cause diabetes, you have to pick the sources that you think are reliable. Peer-reviewed doesn't necessarily make something more reliable.
Therese, you're entitled to you opinion, but if you're open to reading new things, please consider what I'm saying here, once again: many of the peer-reviewed articles that discuss vaccine injury and risk are published in the same journals as the ones that tout their safety and effectiveness. Readers wouldn't think they're "crazy" for publishing evidence of harm from vaccines, so long as the science is good. They also allow different opinions to be published, MUCH LIKE THE ONE YOU POSTED FROM NEJM.

Is there limited transparency in medical research? Yes. Often. It's something that needs reform. There needs to be more independent research performed on the benefits AND RISKS of vaccines, because there's bias on both sides of the debate (I'm looking at you, Andrew Wakefield!) Is there a problem with the peer-review process? Yes. However, peer-review is essential to good science - something that you don't seem to grasp. In short, does peer-review make an article more reliable? Absolutely. You need a blind review to scrutinize your work, to make sure that you've included all the relevant background material, controlled for the confounds to the best of your ability (and discussed those you can't control for), and analyzed your results properly. These reviewers don't get paid for this. They are not revealed to the author. They are not tied to the studies. They don't directly benefit from it's publication, and since there are several reviewers for one study, they certainly don't have full say in the outcome.

You're talking about reliability as an emotive trust that you hold for the researchers based on the values they hold in general. That is not science. It's a perfectly reasonable argument for why YOU feel more comfortable with their advice, but it doesn't speak to their credentials or validity at all. Science is an important part of the debate, whether you trust it or not, and peer-review is probably one of the most important processes in scientific research.

I'm starting to feel like my head is banging on the wall here, so I'm bowing out. Again, having reasons you trust your sources over others is your perogative. However, it's (almost too) easy to call your sources' credibility into question as well, so their science (including blind peer-review) is what gives them any strength of conviction.
post #82 of 89
stiss i want to thank you for your posts on this thread. There are certainly those among us who are reading your posts and nodding and shoutig "yes"!
post #83 of 89
On peer review:

Unlikely to ask basic questions about the validity of studies--some examples--

studies that compare one vaccine to another vaccine and then assume safety

studies that exclude children with health problems (which would be okay if they government committee didn't then recommend the vaccine for groups of children who were excluded from the study)

and so forth

another big problem with peer review is drug companies getting away with withholding data--reviewers are supposed to judge the validity of a piece of work without seeing the whole package

the Verstraeten study data has just disappeared into a black hole--did the peer reviewers get to see it?

I personally try to steer a middle course. I don't assume that peer review means a good study, but I don't assume that publication in a journal with drug ads means a bad study.
post #84 of 89
This thread is straying way off topic at this point regarding study validity in general. If this thread is to remain open to discussion, please remain on topic regarding the OP's questions about vaxing or not vaxing a diabetic child.
post #85 of 89
According to The Vaccine Guide by Randall Neustaedter OMD, it would best be advised not to vaccinate a diabetic child, at least with the MMR vaccine.

page 153 says:

Quote:
Many studies have proven that natural mumps infection causes pancreatitis (infection of the pancreas) and stimulates the onset of diabetes.
And then he sites several studies.

Page 154 says:

Quote:
Mumps vaccination has similarly stimulated the onset of diabetes. The postulated mechanisms of diabetes onset that include autoimmune processes or persistent infection suggest that there may be a prolonged interval between vaccination and the onset of diabetic symptoms.
Then he sites several studies.

For example, one study revealed 20 cases of diabetes occurring after mumps vaccine given during the period 1976 through 1989 in Germany. 12 cases began within 30 days of the vaccination.

He also reveals that 5 cases of diabetes induced by vaccines were reported to VAERS during 1990-1992.
post #86 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deborah View Post
Sorry! I was being sarcastic.

Me bad. I'll try to be more obvious or not be sarcastic at all.
OMG, really? That is great news then! I really took it personally... now I get it
post #87 of 89
[QUOTE=ThereseReich;14687558]According to The Vaccine Guide by Randall Neustaedter OMD, it would best be advised not to vaccinate a diabetic child, at least with the MMR vaccine.

page 153 says:

And then he sites several studies.

Page 154 says:

Then he sites several studies.

For example, one study revealed 20 cases of diabetes occurring after mumps vaccine given during the period 1976 through 1989 in Germany. 12 cases began within 30 days of the vaccination.


Yes yes yes - I have read this too about a diabetic child NOT getting the MMR. For years now, my friend whose father is a type-1 diabetic since age 7, received a mumps vax or pill back in the 50's and within the same year he was diagnosed with type-1. And this same friend's pediatrician has warned her NOT to have her children get the MMR because the mumps and rubella shots can actually lead to type-1 in sensitive individuals?? I guess it's actually a warning on the vaccine info sheet, which you can read the PDF online.

My husband and I were thinking of giving our child with diabetes the one Measles shot, but never the mumps or rubella shot. I don't even know why we are considering the one measles, but it's been part of our non-vax/vax discussion lately.
post #88 of 89
Also, back when my baby was diagnosed, I did research on the vaccine she had a really bad reaction to at age 12 months. Her 4th installment of the hiB/HepB combo shot (back then I fully vaxed, being a new parent who didn't research vaccines until after my daughter had a reaction). I remember when I googled that combo shot that she received AND T1 diabetes, there were links to that also. Sigh.
post #89 of 89
I was going to reply to this until I saw how old this thread was. Op, I'm sure you've made your decision by now and hopefully you've adjusted to having a child with T1 (as best as any one can). Sorry you had to join the club. I noticed there are many mamas here with T1 kids... Is there a 'tribe' for this by any chance? My 4 year old daughter was diagnosed at age 2 and it would be nice to talk to other AP parents about the not-so-AP aspects of managing the disease.
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