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is a candy-free child even possible? - Page 2

post #21 of 26
When I read about candy-cookies-sweets I tend to think of another MDC member’s comment about pizza. She/he said that labeling “pizza” as junk food is a rather limited way of thinking about food. I guess what I’m trying to say is that I think it is best to look at foods by their actual content and not just by labels like “candy” or “pizza”.

I’ve begun a search for alternatives to conventional candy, cakes and sweets because I do want to allow these types of treats in our family. I have found many things that could be labeled candy or other “treats” with ingredients that I find acceptable and DC finds yummy like candies sweetened with fruit juice/no additives.

I agree with people about finding like minded like-minded friends or at least understanding friends who will help you limit foods you don’t want DC to have. It is also geographic. When I was in Santa Cruz people were hyper sensitive to what any individual child was allowed to have. Now, I live in a place where people constantly offer DC candy or treats when we are out. In the spirit of “it takes a village” I allow this kind of offering but I limit it when it gets excessive.

I also totally agree with the idea of moderation but this is our family motto and was my life motto growing up. I literally tried everything I could get my hands on – in moderation.

If you feel strongly about limiting all things that could be considered candy, cookies or sweets maybe it would be a good idea to find some alternatives that you *do* allow. You could make smoothies and freeze them for “ice cream” or bake some healthy “treats”. Frozen grapes were a favorite of mine growing up.

I think there are two ways of looking this. Either you can label healthy sweets as "candy/cookies/sweets" and prepare them and serve them as "treats" or you could not allow “sweets” but allow home baked sweets and fruit. In the end, you are still offering the same foods, kwim?
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by rebx
I'm trying to take the "all things in moderation, within reason" approach with DD. I was raised in a NO candy family. We each got 1 piece of maple sugar candy from my father in the winter, but that was the only officially sanctioned candy. I spent my childhood hatching elaborate schemes to get my hands on the forbidden fruit.
Yes, me too. ANd my sister and I would do dangerous things to go get candy. If I got my hands on it I would gorge myself with candy. I let DD have a little candy sometimes and the occasional cookie, and she will leave half a cookie sitting on her plate.

As to wether it is possible, I guess so as long as the child is not independant enough to get money, walk to the store and buy it themselves. But I think it is hard.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
As to wether it is possible, I guess so as long as the child is not independant enough to get money, walk to the store and buy it themselves.
Or, in my case, when your kid is independent enough to sneak out of your view...My sister & I started eating packets of sugar from the condiment bar on the ferry every time we went with our parents to the city (we grew up on an island, so this was a pretty frequent sugar-blast for us)...We had no $ for candy from the vending machines, but sugar packets were easy to come by in all sorts of places. It makes me feel queasy to think about it now, but boy, did we love sugar!

I should have added to my earlier post that there's no way I'll be buying DD mainstream candy because I know she'll get plenty of it from others...So, I'll model moderate consumption of other treats instead.

IdentityCrisisMama - You articulated some things I hadn't put into words yet for myself. Thanks!
post #24 of 26
I was thinking more about this thread and wanted to bring up and idea I learned in Puerto Rico. They have this funky fruit there (I can’t remember the name” but it grows high up on a palm like tree in clusters. They are the size of a grape with a hard skin, which you bite open to reveal a sweet, strange tasting fruit surrounding a large pit.

Anyway, I bring this up because they called these things “natures candy” and I thought it was cool.
post #25 of 26
Another "candy" tip: freeze grapes then they taste like candy too!
post #26 of 26
Another thing to consider is that lots of candies are choking hazards. I've been horrified when someone has offered my baby candy. No child under 3 should be given hard candy or gummy ones. They are too dangerous.

We have been very slow to introduce foods, so the family has so far been good about checking before offering things to my 1 year old, but I'm sure it will get harder.
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