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Language arts (vocab, grammar) recommendations for 3rd, 4th , 5th grade?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone, I haven't done formal language arts until now, but I was thinking it would be good to include some grammar/vocab stuff in our day. Are there language arts programs that combine the two?

I'm not entirely sure what level my DS is working at, but I have a 2nd grade workbook from somewhere and it seems way too easy. I would guess he is probably about a 4th grade level? So somewhere in there...

We already do separate handwriting and spelling so those are not necessary but ok.

Thanks in advance!
post #2 of 6
We are using Writing Tales this year and really like it. It's short lessons each day with a two-week study of a short story (fairy tales, fables, and the like). It goes in a pattern of
-read story, talk about author
-copywork, go over grammar lesson
-vocabulary, go over previously learned grammar with vocabulary page
-reread current grammar lesson, do grammar study
-write rough draft of story

-correct rough draft's spelling, rewriting the words, punctuation/grammar activity
-game or read second story and apply this week's lesson
-final draft of student's story with revisions
-punctuation/grammar page
-final copy of story


A lot of review in the areas my kid needs to help him write better. He's 5th grade but I started him in the 3rd/4th book this year because the style is different than what he had learned before. It's maybe 10-15 minutes at most each day except when he's writing his story. So far we've been pleased - I think we'll stick with it for the next book, too, and then go on to the series they recommend as a good follow-on.
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thanks! so this is all in there , or do you have to pull the vocab words from the story? We already do copywork and creative writing could I continue with my own? or I guess we could do them in that context then, huh.



"read story, talk about author
-copywork, go over grammar lesson
-vocabulary, go over previously learned grammar with vocabulary page
-reread current grammar lesson, do grammar study
-write rough draft of story

-correct rough draft's spelling, rewriting the words, punctuation/grammar activity
-game or read second story and apply this week's lesson
-final draft of student's story with revisions
-punctuation/grammar page
-final copy of story"
post #4 of 6
The vocab words are pulled directly from the story. I have to say, one of the reasons I switched to the program this year was because I knew I wouldn't be able to give it my full attention for about a month or two. I needed something that had it all laid out for us and this does. There's a teacher's book, a student's workbook, and the extra pages for the games and such are available on their website so I don't have to try to copy from the back of the teacher's guide. The other resources suggested are just that - suggestions, so if you can't find a certain book at the library you can pick a different one or use a different resource (also good for us since our library has one bookcase only for children's books).

Not all of the activities need to be done, but it does make a complete program if they are.

In the past, we've used books from the Critical Thinking Company. You may want to look there, too, especially for more specialized workbooks. We used a series called Editor In Chief that can be fairly taxing on the grammar but they do learn it well, along with common misspellings.
post #5 of 6
LilyGrace, does Writing Tales leave the subject matter of the story to be written child open-ended?

I've been looking for a grammar/language arts curriculum to at least use as a guide and it sounds like this might be something he would enjoy. I know he wouldn't enjoy it so much, though, if he were told what to write about.
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
LilyGrace, does Writing Tales leave the subject matter of the story to be written child open-ended?

I've been looking for a grammar/language arts curriculum to at least use as a guide and it sounds like this might be something he would enjoy. I know he wouldn't enjoy it so much, though, if he were told what to write about.
No, it doesn't. It follows the Greek style of learning to write called progymnasmata, where they start out learning how to retell a tale in their own words. Gradually they're allowed creative freedom to change and adapt the story and then branch off into their own writing.

We did use Writing Strands for a while and it was more open-ended. The work was presented as a topic-study and the student is guided through how to write everything from basic descriptions to persuasive arguments. It didn't work well for us because The Kid would get so flustered about having to learn everything at once and be creative, but I can see it working for other kids. The spelling in that comes from their creations still, and they work in about two week cycles: 4-10 days learning how to write, and then a week reading other people's works.
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