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O.K., so I'm a little cranky today, but for the love of all that's holy... - Page 5

post #81 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by annalivia View Post
Hmmm. I lived in Michigan for 24 years, and all of my family originates there. I have never in my life heard of a sliding glass door being called a doorwall. Could be a yooper thing.
Yeah, I didn't live there, but spent every summer there and my entire family (mom and dad included) are from Michigan. Never heard that. (Like the PP said though, we're all lower peninsula.)

Party store though drove me nuts until I got used to it.
post #82 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viola View Post
I think that we can to a point, but there is a threshold where it ceases to become understandable, and can be interpreted in several ways. There are times when I read things here where I really don't understand what the person is saying. I usually just click out of that thread and don't ask. And then sometimes I see people questioning a phrase that seems perfectly clear to me. So I guess part of it may just be what ideas I have in my head coming into the thread.
Yes, I've had this experience too. And maybe more so on other boards (maybe they're easier to find?). But there are occasions when people have such poor grammar and syntax that their posts are completely indecipherable. That is sad, IMO, especially when it's fairly clear that they are native English speakers, because it would be quite difficult to not be able to use written communication in this day and age.
post #83 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krisis View Post
Now I'm terrified it's meeeeee!!! *deletes name from signature*
haha its not you! its not anyone that I have ever seen in TAO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Viola View Post
Lay and lie is another one, most people say "lay down." Several different doctors have told me to lay down or lay back--I didn't correct them.
you should! Especially if its a really haughty Dr. Just knock 'em down a peg or two!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viola View Post
I mean if you said, "Me am going to the store" people would cringe, but probably wouldn't hesitate to say, "You can give that to myself or John."
How about when people over-correct "I" instead of "me" thinking that "I" is more formal or somehow more correct than "me", and not just different parts of speech - "You can give that to John or I" should be "You can give that to John or me"
post #84 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by aniT View Post
I'm sorry.. that should be "You can give that to John or me." :P
Well...that was my point, actually.
post #85 of 119
Thread Starter 
[QUOTE=Sk8ermaiden;14675386
Party store though drove me nuts until I got used to it.[/QUOTE]

I totally forgot about party store! I've been so reprogrammed, and here I was thinking that you just can't take the midwest out of the girl.
post #86 of 119
Wait, what's wrong with party store? Is that a kind of store, or is it something else?
post #87 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsjtc View Post
Got one for you - I live in WAY Northern NY and I'm not native to this area. People here will say " The Smith's live on THE Ruddy Rd." or "Go up THE Austin Rd." "Turn at THE Judson Rd."
They do that in So CA to an extent. Like when I lived in NoVA, I'd take 66 into wherever, and then go up 395 or 295. Now I might say "the beltway" or "the toll road" but that's about it. But in CA it was always "the 5" "the 405" "the 10" and so on. But I think named roads were not used with the article.
post #88 of 119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viola View Post
Wait, what's wrong with party store? Is that a kind of store, or is it something else?
In Michigan, a party store is what is often called a convenience store, or *blank* store. Where I am now, there is a chain of "party stores" called Plaid Pantry (just like 7/11 type places), so they mostly go by that name. In my experience, party stores were more often the mom and pop type places, and sometimes the gas station shops where, in Michigan you can buy alcohol, among other things.

Anyone here from Wisconsin? We were passing through once and were referred to a time machine when we asked about finding a local atm. That was awesome.
post #89 of 119
Haven't read the whole thread yet, but my biggest peeve is when people use the possessive as plural. Example: The boy's went to town. UGH!!!!!!! The boy's WHAT went to town? father? dog? WHAT?? Plural HAS NO APOSTROPHE!! More forgiving, but still annoying, are the mistakes when the singular form of a word ends in an "s". Example: He took Thomas' pencil. It should be "Thomas's"--but rather unforgiving that the bagel company spells it wrong!
post #90 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by brackin View Post
MIL is from Iowa. She uses suspicion as a verb, as in, "I suspicion they'll be late to the play." It makes me crazy. When I told my mom about it, she said it's more commonly used improperly in more rural areas. I've never heard anyone else say it, though. Has anyone heard this??
I've never heard that before, and I grew up in Iowa.
post #91 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by didkisa View Post
Haven't read the whole thread yet, but my biggest peeve is when people use the possessive as plural. Example: The boy's went to town. UGH!!!!!!! The boy's WHAT went to town? father? dog? WHAT?? Plural HAS NO APOSTROPHE!! More forgiving, but still annoying, are the mistakes when the singular form of a word ends in an "s". Example: He took Thomas' pencil. It should be "Thomas's"--but rather unforgiving that the bagel company spells it wrong!
I hate this too, and they do it on all sorts of public signs here.

....and (I hate to do it!) I think you mean "forgivable/unforgivable".
post #92 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by AutumnAir View Post
I've encountered the 'X needs washed' in people from Northern Ireland - funny construction. I would happily say 'X needs washing', but not the other.
Wow, that's great to know! I posted earlier that my MIL and my DH say this and I couldn't figure out where it came from - but MIL's mother was from Northern Ireland

My grandmother was from Ohio (she said Ahia). I have no idea how many of her quirks were, um, Ahian. She had a really unique way of speaking "Give me that there book" or "We was sitting there when John came"
post #93 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadiMamacita View Post
yes. there is one poster in particular where my head gets all loopy trying to decipher WTH she is typing. whenever i read a new thread and am getting confused i scroll down the post to see if her name is there. (she always signs her post with her name- i don't know what her sn is though) 9 times out of 10, yep, its her.
Oh, crap. I always sign my name - now I am feeling neurotic.

On the "go to thing".....

I am from Ontario, Canada. There are British and American influence on language.

I say: go to school
go to University
go to church

go to the store
go to the hospital
post #94 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crystal_R View Post
I noticed people in central/southern Indiana do this. The baby needs changed, the dishes need washed, the floor needs mopped. WHERE IS THE TO BE????
im from tx and i say stuff like that sometimes i say to be, but not always
post #95 of 119
I'm from TX and have never heard anyone say that - even deep in the hill country! I am glad too, because I don't think I could be friends with anyone who said that! Not as a judgment, but because I'd be wanting to claw my skin off every time I heard it. One of my best friends can't type a coherent sentence to save her life and it's almost enough for me to not email her any more. I have been a copy editor for way too long, and grammar that's too far gone makes me crazy.

Yeah, party store is what down here we would call a convenience store or a gas station. But up north they are called "party stores" because they sell ice, beer, soda, snacks like you would get for a party. When I hear "party store" my mind instantly goes to Party City or similar.
post #96 of 119
I have tons of family in Boston- I was born there but not raised. They all say "so don't I" but meaning that they do. For example, "I like chocolate" "so don't I"

It drives me batty! Anyone have experience with that one? I always anwser "oh, so do not you?" . They get all pissed
post #97 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by baileyann3 View Post
I have tons of family in Boston- I was born there but not raised. They all say "so don't I" but meaning that they do. For example, "I like chocolate" "so don't I"

It drives me batty! Anyone have experience with that one? I always anwser "oh, so do not you?" . They get all pissed
Hmm, I grew up on the North Shore (i.e. north of Boston), and never heard that.

I do hear "I could care less" though (meaning "I couldN'T care less").
post #98 of 119
Then maybe it's just my family! It could be an Irish thing, or south shore. They are from DOTchester (hehe) Quincy and now Weymouth
post #99 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by baileyann3 View Post
I have tons of family in Boston- I was born there but not raised. They all say "so don't I" but meaning that they do. For example, "I like chocolate" "so don't I"

It drives me batty! Anyone have experience with that one? I always anwser "oh, so do not you?" . They get all pissed
I've never heard that. Very strange!

Quote:
Originally Posted by seashells View Post
Hmm, I grew up on the North Shore (i.e. north of Boston), and never heard that.

I do hear "I could care less" though (meaning "I couldN'T care less").
That one bothers me, too.
post #100 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by didkisa View Post
when the singular form of a word ends in an "s". Example: He took Thomas' pencil. It should be "Thomas's"
See, I was taught by a real grammar stickler, and he said that words ending in S, Z, X, etc just take an apotsrophe and not the extra s. I struggle with this one, because my son's name is Phoenix, and I never know how to make his name possessive!
Looks like the chicago style guide oks this use.
from wiki:
"On the other hand, some modern writers omit the extra s in all cases, and Chicago Manual of Style allows this as an “alternative practice”.[15] Generally, Chicago Manual of Style is in line with the majority of current guides, and recommends the traditional practice but provides for several exceptions to accommodate spoken usage, including the omission of the extra s after a polysyllabic word ending in a sibilant."

Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post
Oh, crap. I always sign my name - now I am feeling neurotic.
nope, not you! sorry to have freaked everyone out! forget all about it! (ps, I went back and checked and the more recent posts are much more coherent than the first few)
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