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Vancouver(ish) Tribe: Sugared Mountains & Bare Branches - Page 9

post #161 of 705
Lego: I don't know if they have any right now, but Zellers in Lynn Valley usually has tubs of the plain bricks. I know they had them a few weeks ago, but they may have sold out over Christmas.

Piglet, that's a heck of a score. Lego is so expensive!

Ksenia: That's so odd. Why keep it all in sets? One of the awesome things about Lego is that you can take it and mix it up any way you want!


My sister: She has to go to St. Paul's for an angiogram. They couldn't take her today, because they were full. They don't take anyone for angiograms on the weekend. So, she's stuck in the hospital until at least Monday. She's going just nuts with boredom and frustration, because she's stuck in bed, hooked up to her monitors. I feel awful for her. Thanks for the good thoughts, everyone.


Christmas baking: I'll finish the pfefferneusse tomorrow. I'll definitely do the pastry. I think I'm going to skip the gingerbread, though. I'm wiped, and I think my sister could use at least one more visit over the weekend. We're still making pinecone bird feeders and going for a nature walk, as well as the other stuff (a bit more shopping - just gift cards, and some stocking stuffers for dh - lots of wrapping, and a bit of cooking). One week isn't seeming like very long right now.
post #162 of 705
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
Ksenia: That's so odd. Why keep it all in sets?
She is one of those uber-organized Swiss housekeeper types . And I think they have visions of grandchildren playing with LEGO at their home. I just don't know if my children will ever fit into their vision. I don't want to give the impression that I feel that my children are entitled to their LEGO, BTW . It's their LEGO to do with as they please. I just hope they downsize and declutter while they are young and healthy enough to deal with disposing of all the possessions that they can't possibly have any use for. A lot of their stuff is wonderful and valuable, but I'm having more and more trouble relating to how the grandparents see themselves as "stewards" of stuff.
post #163 of 705
Storing Lego in sets feels a little odd to me. I got my knickers in a knot as a kid because of the sets and the instructions. We've only ever gotten Duplo hand me downs and Duplo from the local SOS Children's Village thrift store, so dd has no idea there are instructions. It is one of her favourite toys. We may advance to little Lego soon, but she really likes the bigger blocks for building structures.

Yes, Zellers and Toy Jungle sell plain bricks. Toy Jungle sells bases too. Bases can be hard to find. It's one of the few things we got new.

Autumn Mama, that fort is really cool! We are giving dd two giant playsilks that serve a similar functional, but without the structural integrity.

Storm Bride, I am sorry to hear about the stress around your sister. Medical devices can feel odd at first, but you do get used to them. I hope that your baking alleviates some of your stress - I turned on Jack FM and listened to it and danced and baked for an entire week this December, and it really helped.

I am pretty much "done" my Christmas stuff, but finishing contract work and the fact that my grandfather is very ill are taking up a lot of emotional energy and keeping me up late.
post #164 of 705
There's this collection of LEGO for sale on Criagslist, and yes, I agree, pricey. My parents have a box of basic lego blocks from when I was a kid. They don't want to give it to us, but the reason is that they want to keep it at thier place for something for DD and DS to play with when they are there so we don't have to lug toys across the continent. I totally agree with this and have memories of playing with Lincoln Logs and some rubber bricks and other toys that my grandmother had at her house. They were unique to her house (and if I could get my hands on those rubber bricks I would!!!) and one of those really strong memories... I'm sure that I'll get some basic blocks for our house too, so not quite the same

I'm headed to California in Jan and we're going to Legoland... anyone know if I can get Lego at better prices there? Surely they'd have basic block sets for cheap?
post #165 of 705
I wouldn't count on LegoLand having *anything* cheap. It would likely be the same prices as the Lego website. We've ordered stuff direct from them and it went well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ksenia View Post
Ds' grandparents (ILs) have boxes and boxes of vintage LEGO that is perfectly sorted into sets in ziploc bags with instructions. ...I wish they would at least sell the sets and get the money for it if they don't want their grandchildren to play with it .
Mmm, I had a boss like that. "Oh don't throw it out, it might be worth something or I might find a use for it" he would say, about the stupidest things. I mean really, the value of a thing is in the using of it. If you don't use it, and you haven't sold it, it's just taking up space, which is also worth something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by widemouthedfrog View Post
Storing Lego in sets feels a little odd to me.
Actually, I have to admit that we do. But only the more special sets. Like the rescue helicopter, the beach house, the various Star Wars space ships. We tend to keep them in large-ish ziploc bags so when the pieces fall off, they're still together. I think the recycling truck was one of our first such sets, and I can't tell you how many million times I've rebuilt that darned thing (and with only a picture from the box b/c we hadn't started saving instructions yet). The rest all goes into bins. And my OCD characteristics come out a bit... we use cracked kitchen plasticware to separate out "special" pieces. One container has all the people and their accessories. One has all the angled pieces. One has all the 1x1's, another for 2x1's. Then there's one for the architectural bits (windows n' doors, etc) and yet another for vehicle bits (steering wheels, etc.). And one test tube with screw top for all the little "studs". Not to mention the container for the thin pieces of various sizes and shapes. And the magazine box for all the instructions. And no, I don't expect Calvin to put them away himself this way - I do it myself while he helps, or I sort it out while he plays. Neurotic, eh?

My issue with the various models is the ease with which they fall apart. Their super-specialized bits often only connect by one or two studs, which are just not strong enough. Poor Lego design. So with a few of our models we've even super-glued a couple of key joins.

Toys R Us carries the big green bases for lego - they're not too expensive, but it's only the one size (about 1'x1'). And we've often bought sets of just regular bricks at Zellers (though we did buy one from the online Lego store).

Calvin's latest obsession is Capsela. I picked up a basic kit at the Sally Ann a few years back, but then I picked up another set a couple of weeks ago. Since we united the sets last week, he's been Capsela-crazy. Of course it's been discontinued. And people charge a fortune for it on Craigslist. So if any of you see any cheap, let me know! In particular, we'd love to find the chain (which comes apart into individual links) and the gears that go with it, as well as the vacuum piece and the water pump. DH has put an offer on a set with the floaty bits.
post #166 of 705
Speaking of Lego, a friend of mine took a trip to the States to a shopping outlet near Marysville (in Washington, roughly 1/2 hr from the border) and she said there was a Lego outlet shop there. She said it was wall to wall lego pieces and on on particular wall you could get lego pieces in bulk. You just choose the bucket size you want to pay for and you go and fill it up. Small buckets were $8.95, Med. 12.something, and Large $18.something?

She said that if you were clever at packing the smaller pieces of lego in amongst the larger pieces, you could get quite a wackload into the buckets. She ended up with $200 worth of stuff and didn't get stopped at the border.

My kids, for some reason, aren't into Lego. Instead Emma's been whineing for a Barbie and unfortunately for her, Dh and I aren't budging on that. We don't want her to get any ideas that a "Barbie shape" is the feminine ideal. Any ideas on how to deal with something like that?
post #167 of 705
anyone know where i might get double dutch skipping ropes locally?

any other ideas for a kid who likes 'old fashioned' things?

*
post #168 of 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by vancouverlori View Post
Mmm, I had a boss like that. "Oh don't throw it out, it might be worth something or I might find a use for it" he would say, about the stupidest things. I mean really, the value of a thing is in the using of it. If you don't use it, and you haven't sold it, it's just taking up space, which is also worth something.
I need you to talk to my husband....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellp View Post
Speaking of Lego, a friend of mine took a trip to the States to a shopping outlet near Marysville (in Washington, roughly 1/2 hr from the border) and she said there was a Lego outlet shop there. She said it was wall to wall lego pieces and on on particular wall you could get lego pieces in bulk. You just choose the bucket size you want to pay for and you go and fill it up. Small buckets were $8.95, Med. 12.something, and Large $18.something?

She said that if you were clever at packing the smaller pieces of lego in amongst the larger pieces, you could get quite a wackload into the buckets. She ended up with $200 worth of stuff and didn't get stopped at the border.

My kids, for some reason, aren't into Lego. Instead Emma's been whineing for a Barbie and unfortunately for her, Dh and I aren't budging on that. We don't want her to get any ideas that a "Barbie shape" is the feminine ideal. Any ideas on how to deal with something like that?
Can you confirm a location? That's not at the Burlington outlets (about 10 min north of Marysville) and I thought the next set of factory outlets was the Seattle outlets. I'm missing a good shopping location!

I bet if you fit the peices together into one big solid brick in your bucket you'd get the most in! Wonder if they have some sort of rule against that...

As for Barbie, no ideas except to just ignore!
post #169 of 705
oh artparent, my heart goes out to you. Matthew has a list that is quite funny...one 6 month old silkie hen, 2 blue eggs, 20 pieces of kite paper, a peacock feather, an emerald, amd a small amethyst geode...well, at least he is not materialistic, maybe just a little unrealistic (question mark)

Where is that pioneer Playmobil set when you need it, eh...

Can you spring for an antique-ish piece of jewellery from an antique store (question mark) eith er for pretend or to wear...
post #170 of 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by vancouverlori View Post
Mmm, I had a boss like that. "Oh don't throw it out, it might be worth something or I might find a use for it" he would say, about the stupidest things. I mean really, the value of a thing is in the using of it. If you don't use it, and you haven't sold it, it's just taking up space, which is also worth something.
I'm cursed with this mindset, and a tendency to become sentimentally attached to anything that's even remotely connected to good times, or was given to me for special reasons or whatever. I'm really trying to cut it out of my view of the world, but it's fairly hard-wired. I'm going to focus on the fact that my space is valuable, too. We're really over cluttered and don't have enough room. By modern standards, 1250 sq.ft. isn't much for a family of six, but it should be more than it is...

We keep Lego separated when we first get it, so the kids can build and rebuild if they want to. They don't tend to want to make the actual picture that much. After building it a few times, they go to "general use". DD1 is getting the black widow spider Lego from Santa (it's not just a spider - it can be built three ways - but it's the spider she really wants). I think that one may stay separated a little longer than average. DD1 loves spiders.
post #171 of 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by artparent View Post
anyone know where i might get double dutch skipping ropes locally?

any other ideas for a kid who likes 'old fashioned' things?

*
hmm...I haven't been there in a couple of years, but the gift store at the Vancouver Museum/Space Centre had a bunch of old-fashioned toys the last time I was there...pop guns, old tops...can't remember the rest of it. I don't know about double dutch skipping ropes. They're just the long ones, aren't they? We got one for dd1 last year (didn't realize it was a long one) - at Creative Kidstuff in Lynn Valley. I think I saw them in a toy store on Granville Island, too.
post #172 of 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellp View Post
Emma's been whineing for a Barbie and unfortunately
for her, Dh and I aren't budging on that. We don't want her to get any ideas that a "Barbie shape" is the feminine ideal. Any ideas on how to deal with something like that?
Well, I played with Barbies, and I don't see that as the feminine ideal. (Also, my theory is that if you measure Barbie's measurements while she's wearing pants with an elasticized waist, due to the scale issues with clothing, you'll find her measurements are not so far off the scale.) My mom also let us in the bathroom while she had a bath, so we knew what women really looked like. However, the most fun with Barbies is with the *stuff* - all those itty bitty cute forks and knives and kitchen bits and things. What if you got her some sort of "career" Barbie, like a dentist or veterinarian or something (I even had an Astronaut Barbie), but got her only the one doll. And then any other Barbie items would be accessories rather than dolls. Or look for an 11 1/2" sized doll that isn't Barbie-shaped. I'm sure there's some toy stores that carry something along those lines. My sister once had a "sleepover" Barbie that had a soft fabric body, so it *really* wasn't Barbie-shaped, just had a Barbie head. I'm sure you'll find something that will work for you but still allow your DD something along those lines.

If you're crafty, it can be fun to make Barbie clothes and things. I remember one year, my aunt sewed up an entire collection of Barbie things for me, including a sleeping bag, a cape, some little wire hangers and *pantyhose*!
post #173 of 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by vancouverlori View Post
If you're crafty, it can be fun to make Barbie clothes and things. I remember one year, my aunt sewed up an entire collection of Barbie things for me, including a sleeping bag, a cape, some little wire hangers and *pantyhose*!
Yes. My mom, who doesn't even like Barbie, has crocheted evening gowns and bathrobes and all kinds of clothes...and shoes and purses and all sorts of stuff. I think she should set up an Etsy shop...
post #174 of 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by artparent View Post
any other ideas for a kid who likes 'old fashioned' things?
*
There's a toy store in Ft. Langley that might have stuff like that. Also, I guess crafty stuff - needle work? crochet? small loom?
post #175 of 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
I'm cursed with this mindset, and a tendency to become sentimentally attached to anything that's even remotely connected to good times, or was given to me for special reasons or whatever.
Oh, not to say that I don't hang on to things... I'm somewhat the same way - about some things. (Toys, trinkets, jewellery - but I never wear jewellery!!) but that is the philosophy that I work towards. And I'm making progress. We just picked up a few more boxes of our stuff from my MIL's and the storage locker and I've had to be a bit more ruthless than usual.
post #176 of 705
thanks x oh, but i don't like shopping!

*
post #177 of 705
Lisa Good vibes for your sis

Quote:
Originally Posted by vancouverlori View Post
Actually, I have to admit that we do. But only the more special sets. Like the rescue helicopter, the beach house, the various Star Wars space ships. We tend to keep them in large-ish ziploc bags so when the pieces fall off, they're still together. I think the recycling truck was one of our first such sets, and I can't tell you how many million times I've rebuilt that darned thing (and with only a picture from the box b/c we hadn't started saving instructions yet). The rest all goes into bins. And my OCD characteristics come out a bit... we use cracked kitchen plasticware to separate out "special" pieces. One container has all the people and their accessories. One has all the angled pieces. One has all the 1x1's, another for 2x1's. Then there's one for the architectural bits (windows n' doors, etc) and yet another for vehicle bits (steering wheels, etc.). And one test tube with screw top for all the little "studs". Not to mention the container for the thin pieces of various sizes and shapes. And the magazine box for all the instructions. And no, I don't expect Calvin to put them away himself this way - I do it myself while he helps, or I sort it out while he plays. Neurotic, eh?
Haha no wonder Calvin was shaking his head at our huge bin of lego all mixed together

We keep sets together at first, and then they end up in the bin eventually. Most of our lego was mine (I kept it and used it through out the years...the only 19 year old I knew still building stuff ) the other lego I scored for cheap at garage sales. The thrift store that is close to us had a big bin for $25 which I thought was crazy expensive and wouldn't buy it, but I guess that was a good deal?

Ahhhh Barbie I love Barbie. I don't have a daughter though, maybe I'd feel differently about her if I did. Cayden plays with my Barbie that I kept (changes her clothes, plays hide and seek with her, I think she fights monsters too I found some awesome knitted clothes for her at the thrift store a year ago...so she's styling!
Maybe get Emma a Skipper doll. She doesn't have such a mature shape (she's more 12/13 year old)
I agree with Lori...I played with Barbie and I don't have an odd understanding what a real body shape looks like. It was all about the imagination (her being a mom, working, cooking, kissing Ken )
post #178 of 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by artparent View Post
anyone know where i might get double dutch skipping ropes locally?

any other ideas for a kid who likes 'old fashioned' things?

*
Do we have the same dd?
R wants a China Doll from Santa -I actually found an old fashioned doll dealer in Langley!
You can find long skipping ropes for double dutch at Toy Jungle in Park Royal.
The gift shop at the Vancouver Museum is no longer there!
post #179 of 705
Hello all!

We just went out to get our Christmas tree. It's COLD, but sunny and snowy and beautiful - great huge horses hauled the wagon, we hiked through the snow to find the 'perfect' tree and cut it down, such a fun morning! But did I mention cold?!!!!

Legoland - yes, lots of individual pieces, but no, definitely NOT cheap! We were very disappointed in our trip to Legoland last winter, I have to say....and many of the rides Ryland couldn't go on, and that was lame as he went on similar rides at Disneyland. ANYWAYS, not to rain on your parade - there was a cool area where the toddlers could run around in lego buildings. And another area where they could build cars and have races. We bought a big box of plain bricks (yes, pricey!) and will make a bunch of things to put in the stockings. Ryland is really getting into lego these days, DH is thrilled!

THERE IS an old fashioned playmobile - my sil said she got Tiegan a covered wagon! Elisa, I would also call Kidsbooks to see if they have a book with skipping rhymes, there's some GREAT double dutch books coming out. I've also picked up a CD at the library with the rhymes, I LOVE the sounds of them! I'm ambitiously thinking of sewing up a few underclothes for the kids for olden times play, and perhaps a nightie with a nightcap! Things like candle making kits? Supplies to make homemade medicines/lip balms? Yeah, last minute I guess a lot of this stuff is hard to come by - good luck!!!

Barbie - I caved on that one, I didn't want it to become forbidden fruit. Kea argued that she could take them in the bath or pool, and she couldn't do that with Groovy Girls. We got them at a thrift store to not support the making of new ones :-) and found old clothes for them, and then the idea was to use them as a springboard for creating clothes and fashion - by me and then helping them. In reality, they have become beheaded and delimbed, chucked in the bath and now that the novelty is totally gone, they're not really interested in them AT ALL!!!!!

Okay, off to have tea and gingerbread - hope all of the mail woes and last minute gift shopping ends well! WIsh I could join you for a knit! Robug - how was fiji! Do you have photos?!!!!!! Happy holidays to you all!
post #180 of 705
Thread Starter 
The critical parcel arrived in Richmond yesterday .

beaner&tiegs, thanks for the Barbie run-down...we are already dealing with that here. i love the forbidden Barbie at my friends' houses. dh thinks he can just ban them, but it's not always so simple.

artparent, you can get soap- and candle-making supplies at Wicks and Wax in Burnaby. Good prices and quite fun to go to (small warehouse-type place). love b&t's ideas .
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