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Ongoing Alaskan mama chat December! - Page 2

post #21 of 162
Thread Starter 
I found a wooden crate of ornaments on craigslist for $5. Turns out they are the Thomas Piccone handblown glass ornaments from QVC. Unfortunately we already broke one.

But 40 ornaments in a crate for $5? Steal.
post #22 of 162
With DS - I used a My Breast Friend and really liked it. But IMO its downsides are having to buckle it around you and I think the right side of the pillow is a little too narrow at the buckle. I'm also really large busted (like H cup now). I also got a Boppy for DS - for nighttime nursing in bed when I'm too sleepy to successfully operate a buckle but also so DS won't fight me for the pillow. I like the flat shelf design of the MBF - the "sloped" part of the Boppy is the the wrong place for big boobs IMO. But the little head bumps on the MBF are also in the wrong place for big boobies. I've seen used Bobby's in the used kid stores around town, but personally I wouldn't get a used one from a stranger b/c of all of the spit-up etc.
post #23 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinoikoi View Post
I thought the boppy was too firm, but I do think it depends on how tall your torso is. If you stick it on your lap, how far up does it go towards your chest? So I don't think it is a perfect fit for every BODY.
I agree with this although I really liked mine. I think a homemade version would be quite ideal and not so firm!
post #24 of 162
Congrats on the baby, liza!

I never had a boppy pillow. I just used a pillow for the football hold, or nursed lying down. The boppy I used at the hospital kind of annoyed me, too firm.

Pinoikoi--You should just handmake them! Or you could post a request on freecycle and see if anyone is getting rid of theirs.
post #25 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinoikoi View Post
I found a wooden crate of ornaments on craigslist for $5. Turns out they are the Thomas Piccone handblown glass ornaments from QVC. Unfortunately we already broke one.

But 40 ornaments in a crate for $5? Steal.
Great deal

Fred's has raised their discount on ornaments to 30 % now, but you can't beat that price
post #26 of 162
Holiday Traditions.....

Care to share yours?

Since neither of us are religious and we dont come from a line if cool family traditions, we kinda make up an eclectic mix of holiday traditions as we go along.

what do you guys do for the holidays??
post #27 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfamily6now View Post
Holiday Traditions.....

Care to share yours?

Since neither of us are religious and we dont come from a line if cool family traditions, we kinda make up an eclectic mix of holiday traditions as we go along.

what do you guys do for the holidays??
We have quite a few--lots of traditional foods of course and then some of our family traditions are religious (like reading the Bible story aloud on christmas eve), but most of our traditions are actually based on the traditions from the countries where our ancestors are from.
I have slowly been collecting one ornament from (or representing) each country where our ancestors came from.
We make several foods from those countries.
On the 23rd ("Little Christmas Eve") we have a traditional Norwegian christmas dinner. We figured that the 24th and 25th get filled up with other things--including traditional american christmas dinners--but the 23rd can always be ours.
We open one gift on christmas eve (a la germanic heritage)--it's usually matching jammie pants for everyone.
We also have a couple things that are a little hit or miss...we love making goodie plates and then doorbell ditching them to friends or neighbors (half the time we sign the note on the plate, but we still try to get away without getting caught--it's about the excitement, not about anonymity)
Being part of Holiday Helper is something that's becoming a tradition too. My 9yo and I at least go through toys, books, etc that we have and look for gently used things (or new things that we don't need/want and can regift) to send to families in need. We never have--and quite likely never will--have the budget to go shopping for large things, but we always seem to have a few things around the house, or I knit up a couple hats or make a couple diapers or whatever. DS had some books that grandma had sent him this summer that he wasn't interested in, so I asked if he'd like to send them to HH, and he got all excited because he remembered picking out some GU toys last year to send.
post #28 of 162
Thread Starter 
Let's see... we build a snowman. Go sledding and then have cocoa.

My parents always did midnight mass with us, but my kiddos are awfully small still so we haven't done it with them yet, but will in the future I think.

We do things for different charities- but that is a personal choice I think which ones people participate in. I would like to serve food at a soup kitchen but for now mostly we sponsor families- MDC MIN, Angel tree (some years), Toys for Tots once, etc.
post #29 of 162
Lebkuchen and pfeffernuse. Rum balls and brandy candy (weinbonen -- but brandy candy is easier to say and remember). We do the chocolate advent calendars. We used to get them straight from Germany, but now we get them at the commissary. Actually, i think the last few years they've had them at Wal-Mart, but i don't know if they're really the same. We have done St Nick before -- leave your shoes outside your door on December 6th (I think -- it's been awhile), but we've not done that in several years. I should start that back up. We open one gift each on Christmas Eve. Christmas morning we all hunt for the pickle on the tree to see who gets the extra gift. That's a German tradition. Throughout December we watch all the old Rankin and Bass movies. Stockings get opened on someone's bed. The older two usually gather on Aiden's bed to dig through their stuff. I think they do it because they know I used to do that with my brother and sister. I think that's about it. Those all pretty much come from my side. There are some traditional food things in the stockings -- marzipan bars and the chocolate gold coins. From Andrew's side the only traditions really are to put the stockings on the foot of the bed after they are filled (his mom did that so the kids would let them sleep in a little longer) and an orange in the toe of the stocking, which I understand to be an English tradition (my MIL was born and raised in England). So, we do those.

Oh, and our other big tradition is to put our tree up on the 16th, no matter what else is going on. But that is because I had a younger brother who died as a baby and his birthday was the 16th. It is our way of remembering him.
post #30 of 162
ah, all those sound so wonderful!

Since we have no family traditions other then church and presents, we have tried to come up with our own. I wish I knew my heritage, that would be wonderful to have something tangible and memorable to go along with your family history.

We have our German Intern here this year. Maybe we will surprise her with some German Christmas Traditions! I like the Shoe Idea and the pickle!
post #31 of 162
We have an orange in the toe of our stocking too--I didn't know that was english!
Our breakfast is the oranges plus cardamom bread (traditional scandinavian braided sweet bread). I can share the recipe if you want. It's really good.
post #32 of 162
Oh, and it is always tradition to make sugar cookies. The cookie cutter ones, not just the round ones. And there are traditional shapes, too. We always do a fish and a mushroom. The first is religious (the icthus fish, though I don't think i spelled that correctly) and the mushroom is for good luck. Again, I think that's a German tradition.

Oh, and not Christmas, but for New Year's we eat ham and black-eyed peas for good luck. That's a Southern tradition.
post #33 of 162
oh my gosh... where do my days go? I didn't realize I hadn't been here in so long!

I'm still trying to recover from this back injury (from the car wreck in Oct) and had just about given up all hope of ever feeling human again until my chiro, in a last ditched effort, referred me to an acupuncture clinic. OH MY GOODNESS! I've had 3 treatments in a week and I would say my pain level has dropped AT LEAST 50%. It's AMAZING. I am a firm believer now.

So, I'm finally starting to feel a bit better... which makes me very happy. If I could get pain free, I'd be on top of the world. Wonder if I can ask Santa for that

We weren't sure if we were going to do a light show at all this year, because hubby has been fighting his own injuries (from the car wreck) plus illness, etc. but we've thrown a much smaller scale show together and it's starting tonight. It will make my heart feel good to see the kiddos faces light up (they don't seem to mind how big it is.... just that it sparkles and is bright).

I hope everyone is having a wonderful holiday season thus far!
post #34 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallanvor View Post
Christmas morning we all hunt for the pickle on the tree to see who gets the extra gift. That's a German tradition.
I really would like to know how that myth started out......no one in Germany/from Germany who I ever spoke to had ever heard of it, it seems that this story mainly exists in the US and on the internet.

Here's something about it:
"But the biggest problem with the German pickle (saure Gurke, Weihnachtsgurke) tradition is that no one in Germany seems to have ever heard of it. Over the years this question has repeatedly come up on the AATG (German Teachers) forum. Teachers of German in the U.S. and in Europe have never been able to find a native German who has even heard of the pickle legend, much less carried out this Christmas custom. It may have been some German-American invention by someone who wanted to sell more glass ornaments for Christmas. Or could the Weihnachtsgurke be an obscure regional custom that few people are aware of?"
http://german.about.com/library/blgermyth11.htm

I can assure you that neither I nor any of my family, neighbors or friends in Germany have ever "hunted for the Christmas pickle" (I had never even seen a pickle ornament before coming to the USA )

Maybe it's just a very local custom of one place in Germany that got blown out of proportion to represent entire Germany? They do give a possible explanation later in the above link, if you read on

But, if you want to surprise your German intern with this "German tradition", you might be surprised by her reaction, instead

Anyway.....in our house we did do the "shoe thing", meaning last night we put out our shoes/boots in the hallway and the "Nikolaus" came during the night and filled them with some small presents and sweets. We have chocolate advent calendars (got them directly from Germany this year because last year I bought the ones at Fred Meyers and had to throw them out after the first day because the chocolate was truly inedible). I also made an advent calendar with little presents (mainly hotwheels/matchbox cars) for our son.

In the weeks before Christmas, we listen to Christmas music (alternate between German and American), read Christmassy books, watch some DVDs with DS (he received "Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer" in his advent calendar and loves it, also Mickey's Twice Upon a Christmas ), and we have an "advent wreath" with one candle for each advent sunday.

We will be having our "Family Christmas" on the 24th, will have a nice dinner, open some presents (the ones from Germany and from us to each other), maybe sing a little, read a story.....our son is still really young, it'll get more involved when he gets older. We are still undecided about going to church. In Germany I always used to go, but the service there was in the afternoon, since families celebrate at home in the evening. Here, our church only has a service in the evening, and that wouldn't really work for "my" Christmas Eve.....as I said, we're still undecided

On the morning of the 25th, there'll be the stockings that Santa filled overnight and some presents Santa brought while everyone was sleeping. Later in the morning we'll go to my mother-in-law's house for her big Christmas dinner.

That is our solution for combining German and American customs. I am a bit sad that my son is going to miss out on the "visit from Santa" which in Germany happens on Christmas Eve (either a relative dresses up, or someone is hired to play Santa, and the children are supposed to sing a song, say a poem, etc. before Santa hands out the presents). But I also didn't want to deprive him of the custom of Santa coming secretly overnight, filling stockings and leaving presents, so we had to make a choice. (I couldn't figure out a way to explain why Santa would first appear in person on the 24th and then secretly come back during the night.....forgot something, Santa? )

This is the first year that our son's old enough to start understanding a little about Christmas, so I am trying to establish some traditions for our family that are going to stay the same for years to come. Not always easy
post #35 of 162
well at least I know how I ended up with a pickle ornament LOL! Someone gave it to me as a gift a couple of years ago and I thought it was the strangest thing!
post #36 of 162
As for the pickle, I don't know. I'll have to ask my oma how it got started in our family. My family is German on all sides, but she is the only one born and raised there. Didn't speak a word of English when she moved to the States. I'll try and remember to ask her next time I talk to her and share what she says.
post #37 of 162
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallanvor View Post

Oh, and not Christmas, but for New Year's we eat ham and black-eyed peas for good luck. That's a Southern tradition.
A lot of Asian families I know (some Filipino, some others) eat long noodles for New Years for long life..

But ham and black eyed peas with long noodles sounds wrong somehow
post #38 of 162
where did everyone go today? what ya gals doing?
post #39 of 162
Thread Starter 
for Service High
post #40 of 162
baking cookies!
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