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Life skills everyone should have before leaving home... - Page 3

post #41 of 183
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by <3mymom View Post
Oh and whoever has said sewing, that's definitely been a skill I've used probably once a week at least. I even got a part-time job in my first week of school because I was talking to the owner of a store who was worrying about a skirt that had been damaged, I offered to fix it and she hired me to do that and help around the store.
I worked in the costume shop in college theatre. It was amazing how many people couldn't sew on a button. When I came in the instructor asked if I'd ever sewn before (yes, at home by hand and I took a class in high school) and was AMAZED that I could sew a straight seam on a machine....
post #42 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by AFWife View Post
I worked in the costume shop in college theatre. It was amazing how many people couldn't sew on a button. When I came in the instructor asked if I'd ever sewn before (yes, at home by hand and I took a class in high school) and was AMAZED that I could sew a straight seam on a machine....
Yea I actually worked in costume shop at a college when I was in highschool. Everyone was quite impressed with my sewing skills and I learned how to make patterns which has been really useful too.
post #43 of 183
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by <3mymom View Post
Yea I actually worked in costume shop at a college when I was in highschool. Everyone was quite impressed with my sewing skills and I learned how to make patterns which has been really useful too.
I can follow a pattern...but MAKE one? I'm jealous!
post #44 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by AFWife View Post
I can follow a pattern...but MAKE one? I'm jealous!
The Costume Technician's Handbook by Rosemary Ingham has really good and pretty easy instructions for pattern making. It's basically just a matter of getting the right measurments of a person and knowing how to use those to draw some lines.
post #45 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by AFWife View Post
I worked in the costume shop in college theatre. It was amazing how many people couldn't sew on a button. When I came in the instructor asked if I'd ever sewn before (yes, at home by hand and I took a class in high school) and was AMAZED that I could sew a straight seam on a machine....
I hate sewing. I have sewn on a button, but it's been a long, long time. If I have to, I can sew up a very small tear, but it's not neat. I've sewn up multiple popped seams, and even some patches, but they're also not neat. I just find sewing insanely stressful. I think I get that from my mom. She could sew clothes (and did, when we were kids), but she never liked sewing. DS1 is learning some very basic sewing, but I can't teach him any more than that.

I don't think the local high school even offers sewing, anymore. They used to offer a choice, in 8th grade, between industrial education (at that time, that was introductory metalwork, woodwork, drafting and electronics) and home education (cooking and sewing). I chose IE, because I didn't want to sew! I've never used a sewing machine. My ex was pretty good with a needle and thread, because he learned in cadets...but he didn't like it, either!

I think I'm going to farm out sewing instruction for my kids, or I'm going to have to learn myself. *gulp*
post #46 of 183
Reading this list is making me crack up. I learned little to none in the life skills department from my mom. It is amazing that I didn't mess up my life royally when I moved out at 18. I couldn't cook, barely could clean, had never paid a bill or managed my own money, DH taught me to drive for real, didn't know how to do laundry, grocery shop or change a tire. I could read a map and sew on a button.

Knowing how to negotiate is a huge life skill. From bargaining at a garage sale or car dealership to negotiating pay on the job or who is going to take out the trash this week.

How to argue/disagree effectively. My parents screamed and yelled and then resummed pouting and nagging, but accomplished nothing. Learning to talk through an issue with friends, neighbors, partners or kids and reach concensus or compromise is super important to a happy life.
post #47 of 183
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
I hate sewing. I have sewn on a button, but it's been a long, long time. If I have to, I can sew up a very small tear, but it's not neat. I've sewn up multiple popped seams, and even some patches, but they're also not neat. I just find sewing insanely stressful. I think I get that from my mom. She could sew clothes (and did, when we were kids), but she never liked sewing. DS1 is learning some very basic sewing, but I can't teach him any more than that.

I don't think the local high school even offers sewing, anymore. They used to offer a choice, in 8th grade, between industrial education (at that time, that was introductory metalwork, woodwork, drafting and electronics) and home education (cooking and sewing). I chose IE, because I didn't want to sew! I've never used a sewing machine. My ex was pretty good with a needle and thread, because he learned in cadets...but he didn't like it, either!

I think I'm going to farm out sewing instruction for my kids, or I'm going to have to learn myself. *gulp*
The class I took was a home ec type class. We had 1/2 a semester of sewing and 1/2 a semester of cooking. It was really useful.
And, I'm not saying you have to be a seamstress! What you can do is what I'm talking about...basic, quick fixes until you can get it done better. Like, if you're at church and the button on your blouse pops off you should know how to fix it in the bathroom.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SeekingJoy View Post
How to argue/disagree effectively. My parents screamed and yelled and then resummed pouting and nagging, but accomplished nothing. Learning to talk through an issue with friends, neighbors, partners or kids and reach concensus or compromise is super important to a happy life.
Agree. I learned what NOT to do by observing my parents
post #48 of 183
Since I first came to MDC dealing with PTSD after a horrible first birth experience, how to be politely assertive; to have certain expectations of medical and other professionals, and how to proceed if they are not met is pretty high on my list.

I also agree with the home and money management ideas.
post #49 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelly1101 View Post
Social Skills. How to talk to and deal with people politely in day to day life. Man, I've known some who apparently never learned that. I'm not talking about being the most popular person in the world... I'm talking about having the courtesy to open doors for people, and not cuss out old ladies at 7-11.
Social Skills is a big one. And not just because of some people who are deliberately rude, but so many teens just have no clue. They don't know how to carry on a polite conversation because all they do with their friends is text.

How to manage a bank account would be the one thing I should have learned before I went to college.
post #50 of 183
Birth control, safe sex, how to recognize a toxic or abusive relationship.

How to talk out the important things before you decide to have kids with someone, and how not to have kids until you are ready.
post #51 of 183
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post
Birth control, safe sex, how to recognize a toxic or abusive relationship.

How to talk out the important things before you decide to have kids with someone, and how not to have kids until you are ready.
Good ones. I didn't even think about these.
post #52 of 183
Lots of great suggestions already posted. I'm adding to the list:

Basic first aid and safety procedures (ready your home with working flashlights, fire extinguishers, carbon monoxide and smoke detectors.

Swimming, skating and bicycling

Booking airline tickets, going through customs and immigration, checking into a hotel, packing for travel

Street safety (paying attention to surroundings, walking with confidence, how to hold your purse, learn a few self-defense moves)

How to skip a stone and juggle



And a few finer details, which may or may not apply depending on lifestyle:

How to use chopsticks

How to manage different foods - open a pomegranate, dice a mango, crack/peel shellfish (crab, lobster, prawns), uncork wine

Use an axe or hatchet, cut firewood, build a fire

Strip paint, prep for new paint, fix holes in drywall, and painting walls and crown molding

Hang pictures or artwork or shelves
post #53 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post
How to skip a stone and juggle



And a few finer details, which may or may not apply depending on lifestyle:

How to use chopsticks

How to manage different foods - open a pomegranate, dice a mango, crack/peel shellfish (crab, lobster, prawns), uncork wine

Use an axe or hatchet, cut firewood, build a fire

Strip paint, prep for new paint, fix holes in drywall, and painting walls and crown molding

Hang pictures or artwork or shelves
I can't decide if some of these are joking or serious. Skip a stone and juggle? As for shellfish.. I don't like them so I have no need to know how to crack or peel them. The same goes for pomegranates.
post #54 of 183
I think our definitions of "basic" are a little different. In any case, this caveat:
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post
And a few finer details, which may or may not apply depending on lifestyle:
strongly applies to all this, imo:

Quote:
skating and bicycling

Booking airline tickets, going through customs and immigration, checking into a hotel, packing for travel
I can't skate (and probably won't try again - I don't enjoy it, and it stresses me out). I didn't ride a bike for almost 20 years. If dh's family weren't so far away, and if he didn't want to travel, I'd never get on a plane, and I don't even like staying in hotels. I managed quite well without these "basic" skills well into my 30s. I think they're good things to learn, and I think bicycling is awesome (even though I suck at it, and don't like traffic even a little bit). But, I don't think any of these things are basic.

Quote:
Swimming,
This is probably the only original (ie. other posters haven't already covered it) that I'd call basic, and think everyone should learn. I hadn't thought of it, but it's really important, imo. One never knows when they could end up unexpectedly near water, and this is a survival skill.
post #55 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
<swimming>
This is probably the only original (ie. other posters haven't already covered it) that I'd call basic, and think everyone should learn. I hadn't thought of it, but it's really important, imo. One never knows when they could end up unexpectedly near water, and this is a survival skill.
I have read most of the replies, but has general survival skills been mentioned?
how to build a fire, tie some basic knots, read a compass, how to find fresh water, basics of edible plants/mushrooms/berries, etc etc (i have seen many an episode of survivorman.. can you tell??)

you never know when your car is going to break down in the middle of nowhere..

one thing I wish I were better at is keeping a tidy home. I had chores and things as a kid, but somehow keeping a neat and decluttered home didn't sink in. Any ideas on how to get a kid to learn to value being tidy??
post #56 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadiMamacita View Post
one thing I wish I were better at is keeping a tidy home. I had chores and things as a kid, but somehow keeping a neat and decluttered home didn't sink in. Any ideas on how to get a kid to learn to value being tidy??
I don't know how you would go about teaching a child a skill you don't yourself possess. To me.. it would seem hypocritical if you try to teach your child the "value of being tidy" but you don't practice it yourself. Ya know?
post #57 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by aniT View Post
I don't know how you would go about teaching a child a skill you don't yourself possess. To me.. it would seem hypocritical if you try to teach your child the "value of being tidy" but you don't practice it yourself. Ya know?
right- I aspire to be a better home-keeper! so you think that just keeping a tidy home will help a child learn to do so as well?
my childhood home was not cluttery.. just my bedroom! so I don't know.
post #58 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadiMamacita View Post
right- I aspire to be a better home-keeper! so you think that just keeping a tidy home will help a child learn to do so as well?
my childhood home was not cluttery.. just my bedroom! so I don't know.
I don't know. My childhood home was not clean.. neither is mine now. However my DH grew up in a clean home and had chores. His mother taught him how to keep things tidy. But he does not practice this at all.

He is as bad as the kids about leaving clothes laying all over the place (why do we take off our cloths in the family room anyway people!?!) And I have really had to get on to him in the last several days to clean up his spills. Spilling apple juice on the floor and just walking off and leaving it.. dropping pineapple on the floor getting it all over the cupboard doors and leaving it until I gave him a rag and a spray bottle and told him to clean up his mess!

So.. I don't think just keeping a clean home or teaching them how to keep things clean will make any difference. I don't know what would/does. A housekeeper maybe?

I think it all comes down to personality traits honestly. Some people like to clean.. some people do not! Dyslexics like things all out in the open (ie.. all over the floor, tables, ect) where they can find it.. other people that drives them insane!

My mother was big at just shoving things in drawers, boxes, ect and hiding them. That drives me CRAZY! I would rather things be out where I can find them than crammed in some random place where I will never find them again!! (my mom often re bought things she already owned becuase she had no idea where it was.)
post #59 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geofizz View Post
How to get from home to where you need to go on a regular basis without a car. How to walk, how to take public transit, how to ride a bike and plan a route.
This too! I have asked numerous questions about the aforementioned young woman's access to public transportation, bike paths, etc. and the answer has consistently been that she either won't use them or doesn't know how. It freaks me out!
post #60 of 183
Great thread! Everything I'd put on the list has already been mentioned, except one, the one I was most appalled that some of the 50 women on my dorm floor did not have:

How to use a bathroom courteously and clean up after yourself enough to account for the fact that the bathroom is professionally cleaned only once every 48 hours. I mean, it seems to me that that is more than adequately frequent cleaning, yet that bathroom sometimes bordered on unusable. The girls who'd grown up with maids figured it was normal to drop wet towels, tampon applicators, and stained panties on the floor and just leave them there expecting them to magically disappear.
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