or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Reality check in Wal Mart
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Reality check in Wal Mart - Page 2

post #21 of 50
I agree about the choking hazards. They have to pay for special testing to get stuff on the market for under-threes. I think what they do is just label it 3+ and plan on some people buying it for "off-use".

That is why there are A LOT of toys for kids 3+ and way, way fewer for kids of any other age group, in my opinion. A lot of baby toys are labeled 3+.

That said, puzzles are one of those things that appeals to a specific intelligence and I wouldn't be surprised if there were five-year-olds with even above-average intelligence who enjoyed doing those puzzles. Only a puzzle-obsessed preschooler would tire of them that quickly. My child didn't even look at a puzzle until this year, and then she learned to do all of them in like, one afternoon. I know another child who has been doing puzzles from age 17 months an on, and she learns them one by one.
post #22 of 50
Moving to Parenting since it applies to many children and parents.
post #23 of 50
How about board games? So many "junior" versions say 8+ or 9+ but really the requirement is only being able to read. The games themselves are actually pretty easy to understand. My dd adores board games and has been playing these type of games since she was able to read when she was 4. I absolutely do not go by these age recommendations for skill as I think kids are too variable in abilities. The choking hazard, I follow that one to a T, though. Dd is 7 now, so we never have to worry about this anymore, but did so when she was a toddler as she put everything in her mouth.
post #24 of 50
Bean's been playing Settlers of Catan for a few years now. The box says it's for 10+, but while there are small pieces involved there's almost no reading whatsoever. There's a little bit on different cards you can draw, but there are so few cards that Bean had no trouble memorizing them (and in fact had memorized them before he started playing). There's strategy, and the game is infinitely variable, but if you can count the pips on a pair of dice and remember what the development cards are for, you should be able to play the game without any reading at all and with little effort. He loves it, it's one of his favorite things to do with his father and grandfather.
post #25 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
I absolutely do not go by these age recommendations for skill as I think kids are too variable in abilities. The choking hazard, I follow that one to a T, though.
I didn't even follow the choking hazard one after about 18 mo, because my kids didn't put toys in their mouth after that. And, we have a 6 year age gap between kids, so there were always "bigger kid" toys around when ds was a baby--impossible to avoid! So I was just vigilant with supervision.

But, yes, the age recommendations are just that--recommendations. Some children will be able to enjoy the toy before that age. My mom said that she never paid much attention to them, back in the '70s, because my sister and I could enjoy the games and puzzles much earlier. When I give a gift, however, I find the age recommendations to be helpful. Even if a child was able to do a 500 piece puzzle at age 5, she will likely still enjoy it at age 8+, kwim? I still like to do 500 piece puzzles, and I'm way older than 8
post #26 of 50
My kids aren't really into puzzles. I thought they would be because I just love puzzles, but we have all the wonderful wooden puzzles that never get played with.

What has suprised me is that dd2 got all these toys for her birthday that say ages 9 months +, and she never plays with them, the four year old does! I think it is because they make noise and have flashing lights, but dd1 just loves all the "baby" toys. DD2 still gets the most joy out of empty boxes and beating my pots and pans with a wooden spoon.
post #27 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgianforti View Post
I think his voice is just very whiney!
Yes! I'm not sure what's more annoying - his whiney voice or the fact that his parents seem to have infinite patience!
post #28 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by hibiscus mum View Post
Yes! I'm not sure what's more annoying - his whiney voice or the fact that his parents seem to have infinite patience!
We banned Caillou because dd1 started whining so much. She started sounding just like him and since I don't have infinite patience, it had to stop!
post #29 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgianforti View Post
I think his voice is just very whiney!
His voice is VERY whiney! I like the show's concept... but wish he wasn't such a whiner. Even Rosie has a stronger resolve than him.

And, why aren't his parents a little concerned that he hasn't grown any hair yet?
post #30 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdnaMarie View Post
I agree about the choking hazards. They have to pay for special testing to get stuff on the market for under-threes. I think what they do is just label it 3+ and plan on some people buying it for "off-use".

That is why there are A LOT of toys for kids 3+ and way, way fewer for kids of any other age group, in my opinion. A lot of baby toys are labeled 3+.
This explains a lot. This annoys me to no end. There area bunch of things (like puzzles) that DS would love to do, but they're all labeled 3+! I figured it was the choking hazard thing, and I'll buy them anyway, but I always wondered why they didn't make these age-appropriate things for 2+.
post #31 of 50
Umm, on the puzzles, my observation is that kid's abilities vary widely in this area. My kid is TERRIBLE at puzzles. When I brought this up with one of his preschool teachers, she said, oh yeah, he's in the range of typical kids. At 3, some of them can do the little pieces and some can't even do the wooden ones that fit into a board yet.

Catherine
post #32 of 50
I wonder if it is 3+ because many families wait to introduce the alphabet until around that age. Puzzle ability also varies widely for kids. My dd had very little interest or patience with puzzles that had more than 10 pieces or so until she turned five, she is seven now and will sometimes do a puzzle if it is the only thing to do. This puzzle probably also was a choking hazard, but it may also be that you have a child who is great at puzzles and are comparing all kids to your child.
post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by nextcommercial View Post
His voice is VERY whiney! I like the show's concept... but wish he wasn't such a whiner. Even Rosie has a stronger resolve than him.

And, why aren't his parents a little concerned that he hasn't grown any hair yet?
A lot of kids have ridiculously whiny voices. Caillou doesn't have any hair because "caillou" is French for "pebble". The whole concept is that he's a pebble-headed kid.
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by crl View Post
Umm, on the puzzles, my observation is that kid's abilities vary widely in this area.
That's been my experience, too.

I must admit, I was about to come on here and say something snarky like, "when you're at a get-together and realize that none of your child's same-age friends remember what breastfeeding was like" --

Because it seemed kind of competitive at first glance ...

But then I realized it must have started out in the gifted-child forum and then got moved here.

I DO get lots of reality-checks that my kids are developmentally-different from other kids, though ...

I.e., I had one who did the "testing gravity"-thing well beyond what most people considered the "normal toddler" age. Meaning, when she said she was done with her food I had to hurry and get the plate, or else she just couldn't resist the impulse to send the whole plate flying ...

And I still remember this episode where Caillou was whining 'cause he had to have sunscreen rubbed into the top of his head. If I remember right, he was whining about "How come Rosie doesn't have to have any there?" and his dad said, "Because Rosie has hair" --

But we haven't seen it in a while, so maybe I'm imagining parts of it.
post #35 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by eepster View Post
Usually safety.
Yes it is a safety thing. My DH used to work for a company that manufactured baby items. The safety testing required for something to be labeled age 3+ is much less stringent and less expensive than for items labeled for infants.
post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post

But then I realized it must have started out in the gifted-child forum and then got moved here.

This is indeed what happened.
post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyMommy2 View Post
Yes - I think that 3+ is just the default for choking hazards.
yep.
post #38 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
Because it seemed kind of competitive at first glance ...


Quote:
But then I realized it must have started out in the gifted-child forum and then got moved here.
Oh, is that what happened? I was wondering when "reality check" started meaning "moments that reinforce my belief that my kid is smarter than all the rest."
post #39 of 50
This is a very strange thread lol.

If puzzles are a measurement of how smart a kid is, well my son must have the intelligence of a lava rock because he's never liked them nor been good at them.
post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquishyKitty View Post
This is a very strange thread lol.

If puzzles are a measurement of how smart a kid is, well my son must have the intelligence of a lava rock because he's never liked them nor been good at them.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Parenting
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Reality check in Wal Mart