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People who feel they "have" to intervene - Page 7

post #121 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by JL83 View Post


So if an adult did what is the most recommended way to have a respectful conversation with a child, which is to get down on their level and actually talk to them... Your child, at 4.5yo, would hit them?

It sounds like it is a good idea that you stay with her.
The recommendation is to talk with them, not argue with them.

And this is a great example of why since all kids are different, "the most recommended way" might not work for every kid.

Even more reason to make sure that the adults know the individual children before they are responsible for them.
post #122 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by chfriend View Post
The recommendation is to talk with them, not argue with them.
It doesn't sound like the teacher argued. It sounds like the OP's child made a false statement "I am a baby" and the teacher corrected her. That seems perfectly reasonable to me. The girl isn't a baby. I can completely understand the teacher's reluctance to continue using "Baby" as a name for the child under that circumstance.

I guess it comes down to it being a game I just don't play. My sister plays this game with her kids. They say something false and she'll just tell them they are right. Like that the steak being served for supper is chicken, or that their cup has more juice in it that someone else's. It drives me batty. We don't do it with DD ever. I see no value in supporting wrong information.
post #123 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyflakes View Post
I guess I just don't expect people to call me what I want to be called. Not if it makes them uncomfortable. Right now I would love to be called "Ms" since I am leaving my husband, but I don't feel disrespected when people still refer to me as "Mrs".
Ms. Bunnyflakes.
post #124 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by JL83 View Post
It doesn't sound like the teacher argued. It sounds like the OP's child made a false statement "I am a baby" and the teacher corrected her. That seems perfectly reasonable to me. The girl isn't a baby. I can completely understand the teacher's reluctance to continue using "Baby" as a name for the child under that circumstance.

I guess it comes down to it being a game I just don't play. My sister plays this game with her kids. They say something false and she'll just tell them they are right. Like that the steak being served for supper is chicken, or that their cup has more juice in it that someone else's. It drives me batty. We don't do it with DD ever. I see no value in supporting wrong information.
Gotcha. I see no value in contradicting a 4 year old. Different strokes.

But if someone who has been left in charge of a small child for the first time feels like they need to pick that hill to battle on, I don't think it's too big a surprise that that kid doesn't want to be left in their charge again.
post #125 of 160
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyflakes View Post
I guess I just don't expect people to call me what I want to be called. Not if it makes them uncomfortable. Right now I would love to be called "Ms" since I am leaving my husband, but I don't feel disrespected when people still refer to me as "Mrs".


I wouldn't either over the Miss, Mrs., or Ms.-thing. And though I introduce myself as "Susan," I don't get all miffed if some people say, "Suze" or whatever. And I prefer being addressed by my first name by everyone, but if someone called me "Mrs. ______" in passing, no big deal.

But my older dd nearly always corrects people if they mispronounce her name -- and I don't see it as "she thinks the world revolves around her," even though there are certainly some situations where I as an adult would just let it pass ... Susan doesn't get mispronounced so much --

I just think most children go through a phase where they're more identity-conscious.

But I occasionally have met some adult who was rather particular about how s/he wanted to be addressed. Not to the point of screaming if someone screwed it up -- but if someone repeatedly screwed it up you could tell they were displeased.

Anyhow, I just like to make a special effort to call people whatever they want to be called, and to spell their names properly. So I second chfriend on the "Ms. Bunnyflakes."
post #126 of 160
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chfriend View Post
Gotcha. I see no value in contradicting a 4 year old. Different strokes.

But if someone who has been left in charge of a small child for the first time feels like they need to pick that hill to battle on, I don't think it's too big a surprise that that kid doesn't want to be left in their charge again.
Gosh, you speak my thoughts for me even better than I do!
post #127 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by chfriend View Post
Ms. Bunnyflakes.
Thanks

You know, OP, people mispell my name ALL the time, and most people don't think it is a big deal, but to me it irks me. Especially if I have known them forever. I usually feel disrespected if they don't at least try to spell it right. So maybe I am leaning towards the other side of this now

And I would like to add that today one of my students decided that he had a new last name, so I called him that, just because of your DD
post #128 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
Also, I'm kind of an oddity in that I'm not all that hung up on the definition of the word "baby." I don't see anything wrong with a small child thinking of herself as "Baby." Of course little kids aren't tiny infants -- but a baby is a baby beyond infancy, and I actually think there's lots of overlap between the different stages of development.

This is why I see absolutely no need to argue the point, or make absolutely sure that dd knows she isn't "really" a baby ... I kinda think she still IS a baby in some ways, and not so much in others ... and I believe she'll figure out that she isn't a baby, at the exact moment when she is ready to move on from being a baby.
So true! My dd (almost 6) was so happy to read a really old story the other day called "the baby and the bear" The baby in the story (that they constantly refer to as 'the baby' is 5! My dd loved this reference b/c she has been worried about leaving babyhood behind.

Beyond that- thanks for giving me hope about the toilet training. My ds is 3.5 and I'm going to stop pressuring myself so much
post #129 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by JL83 View Post
It doesn't sound like the teacher argued. It sounds like the OP's child made a false statement "I am a baby" and the teacher corrected her. That seems perfectly reasonable to me. The girl isn't a baby. I can completely understand the teacher's reluctance to continue using "Baby" as a name for the child under that circumstance.

I guess it comes down to it being a game I just don't play. My sister plays this game with her kids. They say something false and she'll just tell them they are right. Like that the steak being served for supper is chicken, or that their cup has more juice in it that someone else's. It drives me batty. We don't do it with DD ever. I see no value in supporting wrong information.
See, I know people that always tell their kids what the "truth" is and really- it seems so stifling to the imagination and learning process. I have no problem agreeing with my kids about things that aren't "true". Like my 3.5 yr old pretending to write alongside his sister. I don't tell him- "no that is not a 't'" I just nod and smile and say "oh I see- that's how you write a 't'!" The process, to me, is more valuable than correcting wrong thinking/doing when there is no moral objection.
post #130 of 160
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyflakes View Post
And I would like to add that today one of my students decided that he had a new last name, so I called him that, just because of your DD
Oh that is so wonderful to hear!
post #131 of 160
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dandelionkid View Post
So true! My dd (almost 6) was so happy to read a really old story the other day called "the baby and the bear" The baby in the story (that they constantly refer to as 'the baby' is 5! My dd loved this reference b/c she has been worried about leaving babyhood behind.
Also, I think in the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, Carrie was still "Baby Carrie" when she was about 5.

Quote:
Beyond that- thanks for giving me hope about the toilet training. My ds is 3.5 and I'm going to stop pressuring myself so much
You're welcome! When dd was around 3.5, and even just after turning 4, she sure didn't seem to be near at all to training. Then one day she just decided, and that was it. So just hang in there momma!
post #132 of 160
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dandelionkid View Post
The process, to me, is more valuable than correcting wrong thinking/doing when there is no moral objection.
I agree totally.
post #133 of 160
I'd like to start by stating right up front that four is still in the land of "babyhood" imho. Second, "Babe" is/can be REAL name, I've known people who had it on their birth certificates! And while the first time I heard it I thought it was odd, since I also see it as a term of endearment, I don't think I have a right to call the person something else because I think it's weird. If it's a given name or a nickname, it's there NAME. My name is Angela, it would upset me if you told me that you didn't like my name or think it was a "real" name and so you will just call me Rhonda from now on. I mean, wth? I've seen kids named things like Apple and Champagne and Tomorrow. I can't tell the parent that I think Tomorrow is a ridiculous name for their child, can I just call her by her middle name, even though everyone else in her life calls her Tomorrow. It's an identity issue. When my oldest son entered first grade, his teacher greeted him on meet the teacher night with, "I understand you go by B" (his middle name, which he had been called by everyone since before birth, including his k teacher and friends) and he replied, "actually, I would like to be called P" (his first name). The teacher looked at me and I shrugged and said, "first I've heard of it, but it's his name" and P he has been ever since. I've known people who grew up and legally changed their names. Your name is you identity, it's no small thing.


Quote:
Originally Posted by One_Girl View Post
When my dd feels to much pressure she starts acting like a cat; she crawls, meows, and wants to be carried while she speaks in only cat. She did this for almost a year after my divorce because I thought of it as a phase and was really stressed out myself and having a hard time dealing with a very difficult three year old. Now when she does this I can pull her out of being a cat in a few days at most by spending lots of time giving her cuddles, working on rebuilding our relationship, and addressing the things that are stressing both of us out. I think reaching out for a community is a great first step, but are there other things that are causing stress?
My DD, who is six, frequently pretends to be a dog, she lays in the floor, eats from a bowl on the floor, barks etc. This has been going on for awhile. As far as I know, there is really no stress in her life. Outside normal stress. Her father and I get along wildy and rarely disagree. Im not saying that your dd WASNT stresed, just that I don't think this type of play pretend necasarily means stress. It might just mean a good imagination and a slight obsession with the subject matter. My DD now plays PetVetz on the computer and given her other obsession with biology, who knows? Maybe she'll end up a vet and we'll all joke about how we knew it when she was a "dog" for a year!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by KristyDi View Post
I am a Sunday School teacher (3 year olds).

I would honestly feel fairly uncomfortable calling another person's kid who I'd just met "Baby" for a couple of reasons. It feels like an inappropriate endearment from an adult that isn't all that close to the kid. I personally hate it when people call their kids baby when they're not babies. I realize that the second is all me and others don't feel this way.
But what if Baby were the name on the actual birth certificate? Would you still refuse to call the child that? I think the solution for the OP is to just introduce that way, "This is Baby" Why not? I knew a girl named Princess, one named Queen and one named Quarter. Quarter especially seemed weird to me, but I still called her that. Given or name or nickname shouldnt matter, if this is the name that they are called within their family it IS their name and you can't just randomly NOT call someone by their name. My mom decided she didn't like the name we picked for my second son and asked if she could call him a shortened version on his middle name. I said no, since everyone else on the face of the earth will be calling him by his first name. It's not up to her to decide who he is/what he is called. JMHO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyactsofcharity View Post
Once, a kid that I know went by "Batman" for a significant period of time (like, a year I think.)

There was a girl at our church that spent a few months refusing to acknowledge you if you didn't address her as "Baby Spiderman."
!!

LOVE IT, LOL!! Two boys that came with their sister to dd's dance class were ALWAYS dressed in costumes, batman and spiderman. EVERYONE at the dance studio called them that and they just grinned ear to ear loving it! I'm certain that they didn't REALLY think they were the real batman or spiderman, but it sure made them happy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandiRhoades View Post
Gently, may I suggest that perhaps there is something going on with your dd regarding her feelings of her place in the family, stress, etc? I don't think it's a normal thing for a 4YO to want to revert back to wearing diapers, especially when other kids ask about it (though, incidentally, why were you fielding these questions from other children and not your dd?). The Baby nickname itself I would hedge on with one of my children, but I cannot imagine allowing one of them to choose to wear diapers just because they felt like it. I'm not going back to changing diapers unless it's for a newborn or a gastrointestinal disorder. That's a pretty big step back in my book, and it is something that would bother me.
My DD wore diapers until after the age of four as well. Even when she peed in the potty, she would ask for a diaper to go poop in. I don't know why this was so important to her, but it was and so we did it. She eventually got past it. Everyone in their own time. I also felt that having two younger brothers, a bit of regression was normal and once she felt secure about her place in the family again, we moved on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerchild View Post
As others have mentioned, perhaps the teacher is uncomfortable with the nickname because she sees it as overly familiar. I agree that it's perfectly within your DD's rights to state her calling of choice. But I think that boundaries and respect go both ways--and it's perfectly okay for the teacher to say, "You know, I don't feel comfortable with that. Can we think of a nickname together, one that you like and I'm comfortable with?"
Really? Because I don't believe that the sunday school teacher gets naming rights to my child. I once worked with a child whose nickname was Mimi, although this was not on her birth certificate nor was it a diminutive of what was. Yet it would never have occured to me to ask to call the child something different than what everone else on the face of the planet called her.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JL83 View Post
. I don't understand your objection to that... I can't stand it when kids say they "are" something they aren't. Maybe it's a semantics thing, but we're very clear in our house to use language like "I'm pretending to be a princess" rather than "I am a princess". Your DD isn't a baby. Why would you want her walking around saying she is one?

I find this very confusing. My DD often pretends to be various animals. But it's clear that it's pretend. She's actually a little girl.
But when children of that age are pretending, it IS real to them and that's developmentally appropriate. Pretending is not the same as lying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chaoticzenmom View Post
If I can speak for MM for a moment....correct me if I'm wrong, MM. M-M lives in the South and has very different opinions of child-rearing than most of her peers. Her daughter would be unable to adequately defend herself in most of these situations because children are not to defend themselves in this area. Children are to call everyone Ma'am and Sir and to defer to all adults in a respectful and obedient manner. That's the normal expectation in that area. I was raised there, so I know. So, it's hard not to step in and protect your child when you know that your child is ill-equiped to deal with people who will most likely not be open to her seemingly unreasonable requests. Most adults in this area would find a child like that in need of a "whoopin'" The best way for MM to teach her child to deal with these people is to model. The child will see her mother demand respect for the child and the child will learn to demand respect for herself.

Even when I go there to visit, I have my guard up. I have to pay attention to the interactions between my child and other adults. Stop teasing short, stop any tickling short, any unreasonable scolding for age appropriate behavior. I can imagine living there, it would be even harder.

I don't know if MM is going overboard with it or not and only she knows that. There is a point where assertiveness becomes aggressiveness. But this example of wanting to be called a different name seems like a mother defending her child's childhood. My own mother (who lives in this area) expected me to tell my child "suck it up." for just about anything he cried about. She loves me and him, she just thinks that if you don't teach them to "suck it up." they'll be whiney and incapable.
I grew up in Texas and you have nailed it to a T! Yes, growing up I was taught that children are seen and not heard and children always do what an adult tells them, ANY adult. It took me years to overcome my feelings of helplessness and I still have issues of being nonconfrontational. So I am also often accused of being over protective but I happen to know that when it's a four year old vs. an adult, bad things can happen to the child. Even those with good intentions. I have no doubt that my mother loves my children and her sense of worrying about them is where the endless badgering comes from to not breastfeed, not cosleep, spank them etc. I do not expect my four year old to defend himself against her though, when he is still learning how to navigate control of his own emotions and actions! One thing at a time. Of course I want my children to be independent adults, but at four, they have a long way to adulthood.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JL83 View Post
I don't disagree that I can make a difference. But, I can only control what I do. I cannot force anyone else to do anything. My child can want with all her heart for everyone to call her "Princess", but neither she nor I can force anyone else to do so. So I'd rather help her have realistic expectations where she gets to control what she can control - her reaction.
While I would agree with you in a general sense, as in, hey at auntie's house, we don't get to pick our own plates...when it comes to a name I disagree. If you only introduce her as "princess" then what other choice do they have really?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyflakes View Post
I guess I just don't expect people to call me what I want to be called. Not if it makes them uncomfortable. Right now I would love to be called "Ms" since I am leaving my husband, but I don't feel disrespected when people still refer to me as "Mrs".
But it's just a slip to say mrs instead of ms. If you introduced yourself as susan and someone said, I don't like that name, so I'll call you Gina, would that be ok?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dandelionkid View Post
See, I know people that always tell their kids what the "truth" is and really- it seems so stifling to the imagination and learning process. I have no problem agreeing with my kids about things that aren't "true". Like my 3.5 yr old pretending to write alongside his sister. I don't tell him- "no that is not a 't'" I just nod and smile and say "oh I see- that's how you write a 't'!" The process, to me, is more valuable than correcting wrong thinking/doing when there is no moral objection.
Perfect! If you were always correcting him, then you would be discouraging exploration and learning. As it is, you are encouraging him!

To the OP: If it's going to be THAT big of an issue, I'd just say, "this is baby" if they say "is that her real name?" say "yes" or "it's what everyone calls her, she wouldnt even respond to anything else" I think when you present it as HER CHOICE, well, sadly, a lot of adults dont respect that, so make it YOUR choice. Not "she likes to be called..." but "we call her...." see the difference? Because a lot of adults seem to be of the opinion that if you are doing anything because the child wants it, then they are in control and don't understand their "place", as adults should always be "in charge". And it's not a lie, you DO call her that and, for now, it IS your choice to do so. Because you could choose not to and to make it an issue, but you don't. You choose to call her baby, so therefor, baby is her (nick)name, for the foreseeable future. And so it should be. I don't know why anyone else thinks they should get a vote on what you call your child or what they will call your child, they would never dream of calling you something other than what you have introduced yourself as. Being a non confrontational person myself, I have learned that if you leave no room for negotiation in the first place then there generally isn't any!
post #134 of 160
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anglyn View Post
To the OP: If it's going to be THAT big of an issue, I'd just say, "this is baby" if they say "is that her real name?" say "yes" or "it's what everyone calls her, she wouldnt even respond to anything else" I think when you present it as HER CHOICE, well, sadly, a lot of adults dont respect that, so make it YOUR choice. Not "she likes to be called..." but "we call her...." see the difference? Because a lot of adults seem to be of the opinion that if you are doing anything because the child wants it, then they are in control and don't understand their "place", as adults should always be "in charge".
(Bolding mine) I think you've hit the nail on the head right there.

Quote:
Being a non confrontational person myself, I have learned that if you leave no room for negotiation in the first place then there generally isn't any!
Very wise words that I will do well to remember! Thank you!
post #135 of 160
ok haven't read the whole thread...but i wanted to say thank you to you OP for standing up for your dd and letting her progress at whatever rate she needs to. we are in such a rush to make kids do what society sees as normal that we forget that everyone is so different.
i would have no problem what so ever in calling your dd baby, and it is honestly shocking that so many seem to have an issue with it at all. it is a word, it is a word your dd wishes to be called. and honestly it is sweet. and who gives a hoot. call her baby. why is it so hard to do something for someone if it makes them happy and comfortable in the situation? is it because she is 4 that there is an issue? many people have nick name that they prefer to be called, who is to say if your dd will ever out grow that name and what if she doesn't? nothing is what. it is a non-issue.
if you like the church and want to continue to go i would stay with your dd and help the ss get over her issue and deal with it. (which it seems like you are planning to anyway)
my youngest has a nick name... lumpy. we call him that, he calls himself that and many people we know call him that. if a ss teacher had issues i would wonder what the heck her/his problem was. it is a name, get over it.

as for the diaper thing... bravo for letting your dd make the move when she was ready.

h
post #136 of 160
I definitely empathize with your frustration.

Reading continued responses on the thread, though, stirs up in me my own frustration. I am a generally "go-with-the-flow" or "accomodating" person. I get frustrated because sometimes in a relationship I am the one who bends, because I am understanding and flexible. This is usually fine. But I feel like when I run into people who are quite assertive (like you sound), I am the side that is always acquiescing to your desires, and I am not being respected, but it is a "nickel and dime" thing - so no particular issue I can "confront" about.

A memorable quote that comes to mind is "my rights end where another person's rights begin". I agree with this, and feel that it might be good for you to reflect on boundaries of other people's rights instead of your own - that we each have our own frame of reference.

You could see that the teacher was obviously uncomfortable addressing your DD as Baby. It does not sound like you tried to work out a compromise (by talking with your DD about alternatives or ideas - maybe Babe would be easier, for instance).

I'm not saying that the above is directly pertinent to solving this specific incident now, but I think it would be helpful for you in building community while trying to be respectful of your child and others. Your DD does not see or understand the discomfort her name brings to this teacher (or others) at her age/stage, but you do, so you can be her go-between and work with her on having understanding for the perspective of others. Of course these conversations would be in private.

I hope that wasn't too all over the place. I know that I am not a particularly assertive person, and perhaps if this teacher is not then this perspective might help.

I should say too that I am not assertive, but I am pretty frank with children, because I feel that they are generally very black and white (or they take things best if they are stated very clearly/frankly). So if I were that teacher you might not recognize that I am not particularly assertive in context of teaching, but if you got to know me on a personal level you would understand.

Tjej
post #137 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by chfriend View Post

This is the difference between Montessori (no fantasy play allowed before 7) and Waldorf (no reality play allowed before 7) to oversimplify.
As a Montessori teacher, I had to comment on this. It is a common misconception that Montessori doesn't allow fantasy play. Not true at all - it should just be generated by the child and not adults. Montessori sees the adults role (one of many roles) as giving the child a basis in reality. So, it is the adult's role to provide experiences that are real and based in reality. If the child comes up with fantasy/imaginary play, it should not be discouraged or thwarted.

Which, I was actually thinking about before I read this particular post. I agree that is important to give a child a strong basis in reality. A four and a half year old isn't a baby. I think it is fine if a child wants to pretend they are a baby. It's also important that all people, kids included, learn that there is a time and place for playing and pretending and there are times for not playing and pretending (that you are a baby or that your name is something other than it really is). So, I think it is fine if other people want to go along with calling a child baby or princess or batman. But, really, none of these kids are those things - so it's fine if others don't want to play along with it, too.

I also know that kids behave differently with different people. Your DD may get really upset if she isn't called Baby when she is with you or at home. She may be perfectly fine with being called her real name in a different setting.

Finally, I have a close friend whose daughter was called "Baby" until she was 8 or 9. She was called this by family members (including at school because her grandma was her teacher), but not really by other kids. She really became like her nickname - she was very cutesy, and really knew how to work it and get her way. She was quite precocious. She is in high school now, and a great kid, but the nickname just didn't seem to set a good tone.
post #138 of 160
i can not honestly believe this is an actual issue on this board.
we want people to honor our ways of doing things differently and yet it is only adults who get this right.
why is it so hard for most peole here to see that it is ok to call this child by the name she is choosing? why is it so hard for the teacher to do it? why does it cross anyones comfort zone and/or boundries to call someone by their name (even if it is their nick name)? my SIL does not go by her birth name and no one gives a hoot, we all call her by the name she chooses. is she a lier? is she making others uncomfortable by wishing to be called something else?
i have taken care of many people who go by a "cutesy" nickname. it doesn't bug me in the least to call them by the name they wish to be called. in fact in our old neighborhood we had an older woman (80) who went by "grandma". she wasn't my grandma, her name wasn't hard to say... but that is what she wished and it was no big deal to call her that. everyone in the hood called her that. that is how she introduced her self and no she wasn't insane.
and is one example of a child "playing the system" the reason for everyone to not be respectful of the child.
it didn't sound at all like the teacher had an issue with comfort, it sounded like the teacher felt that the child needed to learn that she had to do what whatever adult was watching her was telling her what to do.
and YES 4 is still very young. having had four 4 year olds i know. i would never think to let them handle a situation where someone was disrepecting them and not listening to their requests.
what if the child had wanted to be called by her given name and the SS teacher called her "honey" instead? is that wrong? if so why is it wrong for the child to want to be called "baby" and the SS calling her something else?

h
post #139 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dandelionkid View Post
See, I know people that always tell their kids what the "truth" is and really- it seems so stifling to the imagination and learning process. I have no problem agreeing with my kids about things that aren't "true". Like my 3.5 yr old pretending to write alongside his sister. I don't tell him- "no that is not a 't'" I just nod and smile and say "oh I see- that's how you write a 't'!" The process, to me, is more valuable than correcting wrong thinking/doing when there is no moral objection.
I don't understand how the truth is stifling. Now if someone said, "I don't let my children pretend they're mountain climbers. I tell them it's the sofa instead," then yeah, I see a problem with that. There's a big difference between allowing something to go uncorrected and imagination, however.

In the examples given of a child calling steak chicken, I would correct that. It isn't because my child is lying. It's because she's 2, and she doesn't yet know the difference all the time. That's not in any way stifling creativity, and I do think it's harmful to go on acting like it's steak and calling it steak when it's chicken. TBH, I've only ever seen parents do that when they're being devious, as in "she only eats steak, so I let her think everything's steak."

The truth and imagination aren't either/or propositions because they're 2 separate issues. We actively promote story creation and dance choreography and all manner of pretend play in our house from puppets to dress-up. It's important to both DH and I, and as a writer, it's my *job*. Still, I believe in truth when it comes to daily life.

The truth of this thread, however, is that it doesn't seem the issue here was the teacher stifling imagination at all. It seems the issue was her believing the OP's daughter truly believes she's a baby and the teacher's need to correct that assumption.
post #140 of 160
Too early...didn't think before I typed. Must drink more coffee.
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