or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Talk Amongst Ourselves › Spirituality › Muslim Mamas 2010
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Muslim Mamas 2010 - Page 11

post #201 of 227

I was diagnosed as severely D deficient about a year ago... I ended up having to take 100,000 IU per week for about 8 weeks to raise my levels to the normal range... and I lived in Florida at the time.  These days, I'm on a 5,000 IU/day maintenance dose--and I need to be checked every 6 months.  Now, that I'm up north, I'm probably going to have to increase my dose even more during the winter. 

post #202 of 227

We've got 10 acres around us, and gardens to work in the summer. I work outside in short sleeves right along with my dh. We both have a hard time with SAD, and both of us get it pretty severely--almost manic in spring and summer, and really, really low in January/February. Last year, I started Vit D, and it was like night and day. It really helped me stay on an even keel, and even the May mania wasn't as pronounced when it came.

 

This year, I bought cod liver oil for myself, and have been feeding it to the kids when I can, and dh started taking it when he caught a cold. He won't take a pill, but he's been willing to swallow a Tbsp of CLO daily, and I think I can already see a difference in him. Normally, he is asleep shortly after 'isha (5:45 these days) once the days shorten, and this has only happened once so far.

 

I also still have D tablets, which I crush and add to breakfast smoothies. We also have free-range chickens for our eggs, and we eat sardines about once a week in winter. The kids drink a gallon or more of milk weekly. I think we probably put up a pretty good store in summer, but I'll definitely continue to supplement, even if I have to be sneaky about it.

 

But I think dh must also be noting a difference in how he feels. I found him researching "huile de foie de morue" this morning. thumb.gif

post #203 of 227
Thread Starter 

I've never really been an urbanite, or at least not an urbanite without private balconies, rooftops, and/or enclosed yards, so I've always gotten quite a bit of sun outside around the house.  We also eat quite a lot of fish, eggs, and typically buy fortified milk. 

post #204 of 227


Assalaamu alaykum everyone!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquesce View Post

I've never really been an urbanite, or at least not an urbanite without private balconies, rooftops, and/or enclosed yards, so I've always gotten quite a bit of sun outside around the house.  We also eat quite a lot of fish, eggs, and typically buy fortified milk. 

Get a blood draw at your next physical, though, sis, because it's shocking how low most of us are on D (hijabi or not.)  I've had non-hijabi friends who tested way lower than I did when I wore niqab, and mine was in the toilet at 20.  I take a crazy amount of D now because of my malabsorptive surgery, but before surgery I needed about 7000 IUs of supplemental D3 in addition to a decent diet just to maintain middling levels of D in the 40s.

 

And now, to everyone, my salaams and salutations.  :D  I've been silent on this thread, I think, but I do check in now and then.  Expecting my second child any time now (EDD 12/6) so make duaa for me.  Hope everyone had a nice holiday season.

 

Amm

 

post #205 of 227
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ammaarah View Post


Assalaamu alaykum everyone!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquesce View Post

I've never really been an urbanite, or at least not an urbanite without private balconies, rooftops, and/or enclosed yards, so I've always gotten quite a bit of sun outside around the house.  We also eat quite a lot of fish, eggs, and typically buy fortified milk. 

Get a blood draw at your next physical, though, sis, because it's shocking how low most of us are on D (hijabi or not.)  I've had non-hijabi friends who tested way lower than I did when I wore niqab, and mine was in the toilet at 20.  I take a crazy amount of D now because of my malabsorptive surgery, but before surgery I needed about 7000 IUs of supplemental D3 in addition to a decent diet just to maintain middling levels of D in the 40s.

 

And now, to everyone, my salaams and salutations.  :D  I've been silent on this thread, I think, but I do check in now and then.  Expecting my second child any time now (EDD 12/6) so make duaa for me.  Hope everyone had a nice holiday season.

 

Amm

 



I should, yeah.  I'm bad about physicals in general ... I'm more of a "roll into the office once a symptom turns up and gets unbearable," which I know isn't a good thing.

post #206 of 227

1jooj, I love hearing your perspective -- the farm life! I worry about getting SAD if we ever move; where we are now is where I grew up and there is over 300 days of sunshine a year. Still, I'm a hijabi and I definitely seek out private spots to sit in the sun from time to time.

 

I didn't know all the things you ladies listed are good sources of vitamin D. So, milk, fish, eggs, cod liver oil, supplements? I am wondering about supplements though - are they hard to digest? What time of day do you take them? I try to take calcium supplements when I can, and I'm still taking prenatals since I'm still nursing, but I find the calcium supplement pills to be a little heavy to digest. When is the best time of day to take those?

 

I agree that getting your blood drawn at a physical is smart. You should definitely make an appointment and have it done. It can really be a great look at your health and give you info about yourself that you didn't know (cholesterol levels, vitamin deficiencies, white blood cell count (immune system/cancer indicator) etc. Spread the word!

 

Salaam Ammaarah! May you and your new baby be blessed and healthy and have a safe, blessed birth inshallah. We've got some new babies making their appearance in our extended family - subhanallah! I still can't wrap my head around that fact that new human beings just "arrive" on earth!

 

post #207 of 227

Thanks for the reminder, YSM. I'm not great about getting checkups either, and have been getting those automatic phone messages from my provider, telling me it's time. I need to just schedule the thing and get it done.

 

On calcium, I was recently listening to The People's Pharmacy and they were discussing a study suggesting that calcium intake doesn't actually correlate with better bones/health. It came back to the subject of D, as well, but people cultures that don't eat much dairy were measuring stronger bones than those who do. Lots of power in the energy of the sun, subhanallah!

 

Salams and hugs, Amaarah, and prayers for a healthy and beautiful birth, insha-Allah!

post #208 of 227

salaams, mamas.  i have been too busy, too low on time for study, for really focused prayer....or even for escaping into a novel.  my prayers lately are a desperate "Allah knows best"--meaning, i would not have this job unless i was supposed to.

 

i was thinking that i could turn my abominable commute to my advantage by trying language cds.  has anyone used the Living Language programs before?  they are very reasonably priced.  (my dh actually suggested i could do Rosetta Stone Arabic, but realistically we need the $ for winter clothes, more practical things.)

 

Jo--i did not give proper replies earlier, but i so enjoyed reading about your celebrations.

 

peace be upon you all.

post #209 of 227

I was recently looking into Rosetta Stone for my children. Reading the reviews and the cost, I decided against it for now, based on our needs and what we have available. I think it is a similar method to how Peace Corps teaches at pre-service training, which is very effective BUT totally conversational/functional in nature. That's something my dh could do as easily with them--and for conversation, we have another language they need to learn first. That said, you'd likely begin to pick up the concepts of roots and how they are expressed as nouns/verbs/adjectives, which goes a long way toward helping you understand spoken/recited Arabic. It would help you tune your ears to the language, which is hard to do in most of the language classes in our local mosques (because they are not taught be speakers of the language, but are intended for recitation).

 

No matter what you do, your intention will pay dividends and you WILL progress from where you are now, insha-Allah.

post #210 of 227

Have you checked your local library?  I was happily surprised to find out that mine had a few of the Pimsleur Arabic courses.  There's also a bunch of stuff (for free :)) on YouTube.  LiveMocha may also have stuff as well.

post #211 of 227

Assalamu Alaikum:

 

I'm also on an Arabic Learning Yahoo Group and these two sites were both recommended.

 

http://quraaniclessons.com/   

 

http://quranicarabic.wordpress.com/

 

 

 

As far as I know, both are free. :)

post #212 of 227

umsami & jo, thanks for your feedback and suggestions.  the pimsleur course is available through my library, and i will give it a try.  getting my ear used to the language, and using the time in the car for something other than complaining about traffic are two goals here.  at home i have a Qur'an recitation cd and book with transliteration ( and amazing gift i received); i find having the words in front of me makes a big difference.  but again, i wanted something in the car, and something in addition to Qur'an.

 

lately wrestling a bit:  feeling that, for me, to wear a headscarf outside of prayer feels like vanity—i think it looks so beautiful, and i like how it makes me feel.  but these are not reasons to cover....it is like putting my impatient, crabby self in a disguise of the self that has some degree of taqwa.  i do not want to be perceived as more observant/devout than i actually am.  i have no clarity on this, but needed to share.

 

salaams and thanks

post #213 of 227
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kangamitroo View Post

lately wrestling a bit:  feeling that, for me, to wear a headscarf outside of prayer feels like vanity—i think it looks so beautiful, and i like how it makes me feel.  but these are not reasons to cover


I disagree with this, really.  But I am not big on considering clothes in any great higher, spiritual sense ... for me a person wearing what pleases them to wear is an excellent reason for their choices of dress.

post #214 of 227

Hi, 

I wasn't sure if I should start another thread or just ask here... so I'm just asking here... 

My 3yo DS is in preschool this year, and they have been doing a lot of Christmas activities, (songs, decorations, getting a tree for the classroom). I am completely fine with all of this. Living in Canada, I know Christmas is big here and it is going to be everywhere. But he is so excited about Christmas, and loves seeing lights and xmas trees, and says "i love christmas" I don't have a problem with this really, I just feel bad that he's so excited about it, but we don't even celebrate it. Just wondering what do you all do when your little ones get excited for xmas? What do you tell them? How do you make up for them "missing out" on the fun? 

post #215 of 227

kangamitroo,

I understand how you feel about the headscarf. Sometimes it can make a person look elegant, or pretty, or feel good. Instead of feeling negative about this, how about trying to see the hikma (wisdom) in why God made it feel this way? I think that feeling elegant/beautiful and liking how the scarf makes you feel is a gift from God. I think it is one of the ways He has honored Muslim women. There is no shame in this at all, in my opinion. If putting on a headscarf made you feel crabby and ugly....there may be a lot less people that wear it. This phenomenon is seen in some societies where women are forced to wear a certain style/color of covering....those who dont like that style often want to act out against it (Iranian revolution). So I say embrace feeling beautiful. In fact, there is a Prophetic dua saying "Allah you made my outside beautiful, so make my inside beautiful." What a positive dua -- recognizing that God has made outer beauty inspires inner beauty. Also, it is my understanding that in Islam you should wear the best clothes you have, as a sign of gratitude for what God has blessed you with.

 

If you are feeling more like you are just bothered by the hijab, or considering taking it off, I totally understand. Lots of people go through a feeling like this. I personally think it is a test, or just a normal phase/feeling.

 

I hope this helped! hijab.gif and for what its worth....i usually have the opposite problem hehe.....I never have time to make my hijab look pretty...I just wrap it around my head real quick before I leave!! hehehehe

post #216 of 227

I struggle with covering myself. Have for years. My biggest obstacles was/is probably my mother and extended family on her side, who should all probably just keep their feet in their mouths, and so I know that's a lame obstacle. If I were a nun and wore a habit, surely my mom would be proud. I covered for a year and took it off around the time dd was constantly pulling it off, and that coincided with when I got my job. So now here I am in a job...and while all my clothes (workout clothes less so but even they are more modest than "normal" folk) are Islam-compliant (Western-styled abaya/dresses a la Silk Route and Shukr, mostly and some long tunic tops with khakis) and I even wear a scarf with them, just not on my head eyesroll.gif...I haven't found the personal strength to make the step. I have this other problem, that I develop a tinea rash on my body in the humidity, and when I cover, the fungus creeps all over my body, even onto my face. It's prickly and itchy and kinda gross, and I have not been able to cure it completely, but I don't get it as bad when my neck is free.

 

I want to, and I am thinking 1432/2011 is going to be my year. I'll find a solution. Insha-Allah.

 

Also, my dh is investigating the possibility of being moved to the Gulf region for work. It's still a remote-ish possibility, and of all the places there, it's probably one of the less desirable places to me. But if we end up making the move, all my problems with scarves are moot.

 

And I'm with YSM on the point. In addition to feeling like I look more beautiful in a scarf (and I do), I really do feel like it works as a reminder for me. Like I'm more likely to have good manners wearing it, because I'm conscious of representing Islam, especially to non-Muslims.

 

I want to talk with dh about it, and I need him to be in the right frame of my to discuss supportively, and then it's a conversation with my boss, and then probably HR guy...and then I guess I just start showing up in a scarf, and family can like it or not. I know my boss will be supportive, I know dh will love the idea, I just am uncertain about the words and actions needed to cross the bridge.

post #217 of 227

I'd never heard of Silk Route....just looked them up! Love the clothes! :)

post #218 of 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommy22boys View Post

Hi, 

I wasn't sure if I should start another thread or just ask here... so I'm just asking here... 

My 3yo DS is in preschool this year, and they have been doing a lot of Christmas activities, (songs, decorations, getting a tree for the classroom). I am completely fine with all of this. Living in Canada, I know Christmas is big here and it is going to be everywhere. But he is so excited about Christmas, and loves seeing lights and xmas trees, and says "i love christmas" I don't have a problem with this really, I just feel bad that he's so excited about it, but we don't even celebrate it. Just wondering what do you all do when your little ones get excited for xmas? What do you tell them? How do you make up for them "missing out" on the fun? 


Assalamu Alaikum:

I know. :)  It's made worse in my world because I'm a revert, and my family all celebrates Christmas.  So the grandparents send Christmas presents, etc. It was easier when Eid and Christmas were closer...because it seemed like everything was part of the celebration.  

 

I don't mind my kids getting excited at this stage. I can't help it really.  But what I've really been working on is making sure that our Eids and Ramadan are just as exciting (well, as exciting as I can make them.)  I also tell my kids that I love the Christmas decorations... and I love how everybody is nicer, and happier...and then talk about how Prophet Muhammad and Prophet Jesus (peace be upon them both) both talked about wishing for your neighbor what you want for yourself, etc.  As they're getting older, we talk about how Muslims view Jesus differently, but still love him just as much.  Now... the problem comes with Santa. LOL  My son received oranges and chocolates from St. Nicholas in his class--so we talked about him (the man).  St. Nicholas was supposed to have fasted on Wednesdays and Fridays... so we talk about fasting on Mondays and Thursdays.  His parents died and he was raised by an Uncle...so we talk about Prophet Muhammad.  As they're older, we can talk about his helping the girls with their dowries..and how in Islam, girls recieve the mahr. :)   For Santa, basically I've just said yes, Santa's a nice guy. We also talk about how Allah(swt) would view somebody who brings happiness to so many people--and what a good thing that is.   I'm not going in to it too much as many of their classmates believe in Santa, and I don't want to be the one to ruin that.  

 

We allow them to celebrate with their class. If we're supposed to bring in cookies or whatever, we do.  Sometimes I make an Arabic cookie, sometimes not.  I also don't care that they colored in dreidels for Hanukkah.  But, we don't put up a Christmas tree at home.  :)  Nor do we have a Menorrah.  We've talked a little about Winters Solstice as the shortest day of the year and the position of the Earth and all.  We have a Waldorf-y book called, "Sun Bread," which is a good read.

 

Sorry I don't have any better advice.  

post #219 of 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by umsami View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by mommy22boys View Post

Hi, 

I wasn't sure if I should start another thread or just ask here... so I'm just asking here... 

My 3yo DS is in preschool this year, and they have been doing a lot of Christmas activities, (songs, decorations, getting a tree for the classroom). I am completely fine with all of this. Living in Canada, I know Christmas is big here and it is going to be everywhere. But he is so excited about Christmas, and loves seeing lights and xmas trees, and says "i love christmas" I don't have a problem with this really, I just feel bad that he's so excited about it, but we don't even celebrate it. Just wondering what do you all do when your little ones get excited for xmas? What do you tell them? How do you make up for them "missing out" on the fun? 


Assalamu Alaikum:

I know. :)  It's made worse in my world because I'm a revert, and my family all celebrates Christmas.  So the grandparents send Christmas presents, etc. It was easier when Eid and Christmas were closer...because it seemed like everything was part of the celebration.  

 

I don't mind my kids getting excited at this stage. I can't help it really.  But what I've really been working on is making sure that our Eids and Ramadan are just as exciting (well, as exciting as I can make them.)  I also tell my kids that I love the Christmas decorations... and I love how everybody is nicer, and happier...and then talk about how Prophet Muhammad and Prophet Jesus (peace be upon them both) both talked about wishing for your neighbor what you want for yourself, etc.  As they're getting older, we talk about how Muslims view Jesus differently, but still love him just as much.  Now... the problem comes with Santa. LOL  My son received oranges and chocolates from St. Nicholas in his class--so we talked about him (the man).  St. Nicholas was supposed to have fasted on Wednesdays and Fridays... so we talk about fasting on Mondays and Thursdays.  His parents died and he was raised by an Uncle...so we talk about Prophet Muhammad.  As they're older, we can talk about his helping the girls with their dowries..and how in Islam, girls recieve the mahr. :)   For Santa, basically I've just said yes, Santa's a nice guy. We also talk about how Allah(swt) would view somebody who brings happiness to so many people--and what a good thing that is.   I'm not going in to it too much as many of their classmates believe in Santa, and I don't want to be the one to ruin that.  

 

We allow them to celebrate with their class. If we're supposed to bring in cookies or whatever, we do.  Sometimes I make an Arabic cookie, sometimes not.  I also don't care that they colored in dreidels for Hanukkah.  But, we don't put up a Christmas tree at home.  :)  Nor do we have a Menorrah.  We've talked a little about Winters Solstice as the shortest day of the year and the position of the Earth and all.  We have a Waldorf-y book called, "Sun Bread," which is a good read.

 

Sorry I don't have any better advice.  


Thanks for the reply. :) No that was great advice. I guess there's not much we can do about them missing out except make Eid really special and fun so they know they have something to look forward to at home too. I like what you teach them about Xmas, my DS is still a bit young but those are great things to teach him when is old enough to understand. 

post #220 of 227


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquesce View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by kangamitroo View Post

lately wrestling a bit:  feeling that, for me, to wear a headscarf outside of prayer feels like vanity—i think it looks so beautiful, and i like how it makes me feel.  but these are not reasons to cover


I disagree with this, really.  But I am not big on considering clothes in any great higher, spiritual sense ... for me a person wearing what pleases them to wear is an excellent reason for their choices of dress.

 

on many days, i am right there with you.  perhaps because this process (of coming to religion, and all that is related to that) still feels very new to me.  that and all of my family and any friends outside the masjid have a very different idea of what looks beautiful.  i have struggled with that over the years in various ways.  it should by now, when i am in my (ahem) 30s, be a non-issue—it is embarrassing to think family/peer pressure can still be so strong.

 

my (nonreligious) dh teases me good naturedly and tells me the scarf is cute.  he is not exactly sure what to make of it, but wants me to be happy.  however, around totally nonreligious friends i have not felt comfortable to wear a scarf—because even if i wore a scarf because i think its beautiful, for nonreligious friends it is perceived as part of my religiosity, and that makes me squirm.  maybe i need to just do it, get it over with, let it become no big deal.

 

that said, clearly all of my overthinking complicates things unnecessarily.  i remember taking a scarf from around my neck, making a loose headband out of it—i loved this for years, even before immersing myself in this faith.  i think i have self-consciousness, because to dress a certain way in the US does give a public religious identity, to an extent.  to say i just like the clothes....that feels like only part of the story.

 

Jo, your story makes sense to me and is a good reminder hat this all an unfolding.  also, i tend to take things too seriously, and need to lighten up on myself!

 

YSM, thanks for your comments.  i understand what you mean, that feeling beautiful when covered is a kind of gift and baraka.
 

tomorrow i can pick up my Arabic cds from the library inshaAllah.  than you all again for the support and friendship here. salaams.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Spirituality
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Talk Amongst Ourselves › Spirituality › Muslim Mamas 2010