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January 2010 Book Challenge - Page 6

post #101 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
I felt the same way about Eat, Pray, Love. I wasn't going to read this one but maybe now I will.
Yeah, I'm not claiming it's my new favorite, but I definitely liked it better than E,P,L. Maybe I can identify more with ambivalence about marriage than I can with having the money and freedom to travel all over and just be, iykwim.

Quote:
Originally Posted by workjw View Post

#4 Hellbound Heart by Clive Barker
This book is a about a man who hopes for all the pleasures of the world, but once he achieves them, he realizes there is a heavy price to pay. He escapes his captivity by convincing his brothers wife (whom he previously raped) to commit murders which free him from this other world where he is being held captive.

DH is a big Clive Barker fan and convinced me to try this one. It kept me interested, and I will probably read another Barker book, but it wasn't really one to write home about. It was definitely a quick and easy read.
My DH says Imagica (?) is one of his favorite Clive Barkers.

#8 Enemies of the People: My Family's Journey to America by Kati Marton
The author explores her family's experiences in Hungary during the Cold War, starting by reading the files the police had kept on her parents (both journalists). Interesting.
post #102 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
Yeah, I'm not claiming it's my new favorite, but I definitely liked it better than E,P,L. Maybe I can identify more with ambivalence about marriage than I can with having the money and freedom to travel all over and just be, iykwim.
while i did like EPL, this definitely resonates with me....i think i withheld (or could not produce?) sympathy for the author, to a degree.

i have tried to read Julie & Julia for two nights. i like the bits about preparing the recipes, but when she gives details about her work life....well, she loses me in the details. i want to say, what is your point? can you get back to the food already? i don't think i'll be able to get through it. but i think it is such a great concept, and will likely watch the film sometime.
post #103 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech

Another awesome book by Creech. In this book, a 13-yo girl is traveling across the country with her grandparents to find her mom who abandoned the family sometime before. As they travel, she tells them the story of her best friend Phoebe which also ends up being her story as well. Very sad and good book.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
One Amazing Thing by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

I really enjoyed this book about nine people trapped in an Indian Visa office during an earthquake. They are all different ages, nationalities, personalities, etc. and at first having trouble working together. Then one gets an idea for each of them to tell a story of one amazing thing that happened in their lives. This was a quick, enjoyable read.
Just put these two on hold. I read Walk Two Moons a while back and wouldn't mind a re-read.
post #104 of 185
#4 Columbine by Dave Cullen
I picked this one up based on a recommendation from this group, and I'm really glad I did. I was a junior in highschool when Columbine happened, and I didn't realize until reading this book how much I didn't know. How much what I "knew" was wrong. It was really staggering to find out.

The only thing I didn't like about this book was how he handled footnotes. Basically, he didn't use them. There are no footnotes or endnotes. Instead, you can turn to the end of the book, and organized by chapter are phrases from the chapters and then the supporting evidence. This drives the academic in me BATTY.

#5 The Heroines by Eileen Favorite
I did not like this book. It was horrible.

#6 NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children by Po Bronson
Again, another book that was really eye-opening. Some of the information would not be new for AP parents I think, but it was presented in a different, more approachable way. I really enjoyed this book, and I hope to have real discussions about it at my co-op soon.

#7 This Is Not How I Thought It Would Be: Remodeling Motherhood to Get The Lives We Want Today by Kristin Maschka
This was an okay book. Not great, not new information, but slightly different way of looking at it that might be helpful.

#8 Jarretsville by Cornelia Nixon
Historical fiction about a suburb of Baltimore. A tale of star-crossed lovers and why one kills the other. It was a good book.
post #105 of 185
"Family Affair" by Caprice Crane

Quote:
In Crane's hilarious third relationship soap (after Forget About It), a divorcing couple fights for custody, not of a child or a pet but of an entire family. Layla and Brett Foster became high school sweethearts after her mother died and her musician father abandoned her in the care of Brett's parents. Their subsequent marriage appeared rock solid, but now, on the verge of 30, still immature Brett is a college football coach who begins thinking the thrill is gone. Somewhat clueless Layla is a pet photographer and co-owner of TLC Paw Prints with sister-in-law Trish, and just when Layla brings up the possibility of having kids, Brett blurts out his desire to divorce. In the ensuing domestic battle royale, Brett's family become Layla's fierce allies, and Brett turns jealous and furious when Layla files a countersuit for joint custody of Brett's family.
Oh my goodness, I wanted to like this book. I really, really did. In fact, I might have liked it but one of the main characters was such a tool it made me want to scream. I have no idea what Layla saw in Brett. He is a narcissistic twit to the very bitter end. So any enjoyment I might have had was negated by him. Sorry.
post #106 of 185
#1 Crazy for the Storm, a memoir of survival by Norman Ollestand
This is the story of a boy surviving a small plane crash. The parenting of his father and quasi-stepfather make up much of the book and I enjoyed that. There is much surfing and skiing and I read all of these descriptions, but they are written for those who know and appreciate the sports, so they left me a little lost. I could have used a lot more at the end. Good, enjoyable, not a favorite. I'll be interested to see how the book club discussion goes next week.
post #107 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
Thanks. It definitely was, as far as the hurting other people kind of stuff. (Minus the relatives who feel sad about it all.) It's been quite the last six months -- he was arrested a few weeks after I got hit by a car. My poor mom.
Aw man, that must have been a trial for your mom! I'm sorry about all that, I hope things get better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kangamitroo View Post
while i did like EPL, this definitely resonates with me....i think i withheld (or could not produce?) sympathy for the author, to a degree.

i have tried to read Julie & Julia for two nights. i like the bits about preparing the recipes, but when she gives details about her work life....well, she loses me in the details. i want to say, what is your point? can you get back to the food already? i don't think i'll be able to get through it. but i think it is such a great concept, and will likely watch the film sometime.
to what you all said about the traveling around the world in EPL I didn't even realize she had a new book, I'm curious about it now!

And I actually just finished Julie and Julia yesterday. I really liked it! Her writing style cracked me up. And maybe since I had seen the movie already and feel somewhat ambivalent about my job too, I could enjoy all the writing about all the other stuff besides the food. I did wish there was more time spent talking about Julia though. I am definitely planning on picking up some books about JC herself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbond View Post
#4 Columbine by Dave Cullen
I picked this one up based on a recommendation from this group, and I'm really glad I did. I was a junior in highschool when Columbine happened, and I didn't realize until reading this book how much I didn't know. How much what I "knew" was wrong. It was really staggering to find out.

The only thing I didn't like about this book was how he handled footnotes. Basically, he didn't use them. There are no footnotes or endnotes. Instead, you can turn to the end of the book, and organized by chapter are phrases from the chapters and then the supporting evidence. This drives the academic in me BATTY.
I have considered reading this book, but am trying to read only stuff that makes me feel good this year I heard him speak on NPR though, and it was pretty interesting. I totally agree with you on footnotes, etc. I can't stand it when they aren't used properly, and honestly, I just wish endnotes didn't exist at all. Footnotes are so much more pleasurable for keeping the reading going. Viva la footnotes!

#4 The Big Rewind by Nathan Rabin

Rabin is a writer and movie reviewer for the AV Club at The Onion. His memoir starts out when he's a kid, spends time in an asylum, lives in a group home, etc. He goes on to have his dream job in the AV Club. His writing is clever and witty, really fun to read and despite the hardships he went through growing up, he seems pretty happy now. The pop culture references were fun.

#5 Julie and Julia by Julie Powell

I liked it, nothing earth shattering, but I thought she was funny. I'd like to read her blog, but it's a little hard to navigate now since it's so old.
post #108 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
Just put these two on hold. I read Walk Two Moons a while back and wouldn't mind a re-read.
I'm reading Chasing Redbird now . . . another good one.
post #109 of 185
7. Prodigal Summer by Barbara Kingsolver

I loved reading this. I learned a lot about biology and I have a new understanding about predators, the life cycle, insects, and how everything in nature is so finely linked.

8. Looking for Alaska by John Green

I read this in almost one sitting late last night, even though I have to be up by 5. I couldn't put it down! I was a little distracted at the end because a previous library patron had cried smudgy mascara tears all over it and I could hardly see the text!
post #110 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post
Aw man, that must have been a trial for your mom! I'm sorry about all that, I hope things get better.
Thanks, fremontmama. I am going to try to write him a letter tomorrow -- I guess soon he'll go to a processing center and while he's there he can't receive letters.

#9 The Great Influenza by John M. Barry
I was really interested in this at the beginning and then I got a nasty cold and it was harder for me to concentrate. (oh the irony) Today my cold is fading and I was interested again. One of the things that was interesting to me, which I believe someone here may have mentioned, was how influenza may have affected the peace process at the end of WWI.

Oh, and Cathe, have you read the Wanderer? I think that's another one of hers that I read 5 or 6 years ago and liked.
post #111 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
#9 The Great Influenza by John M. Barry
I was really interested in this at the beginning and then I got a nasty cold and it was harder for me to concentrate. (oh the irony) Today my cold is fading and I was interested again. One of the things that was interesting to me, which I believe someone here may have mentioned, was how influenza may have affected the peace process at the end of WWI.
I've got this on unabridged MP3 audiobook. I think I'm going to listen to it as soon as I'm done listening to Under the Dome (I'm about a third of the way through it).
post #112 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
Thanks, fremontmama. I am going to try to write him a letter tomorrow -- I guess soon he'll go to a processing center and while he's there he can't receive letters.

#9 The Great Influenza by John M. Barry
I was really interested in this at the beginning and then I got a nasty cold and it was harder for me to concentrate. (oh the irony) Today my cold is fading and I was interested again. One of the things that was interesting to me, which I believe someone here may have mentioned, was how influenza may have affected the peace process at the end of WWI.

Oh, and Cathe, have you read the Wanderer? I think that's another one of hers that I read 5 or 6 years ago and liked.
Oh sure BF I'm sending you all good energy

And The Great Influenza book sounds interesting. I'm curious about its effect on the peace process!
post #113 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post
And The Great Influenza book sounds interesting. I'm curious about its effect on the peace process!
My understanding is that the flu pandemic (and this is based on my own research when I was teaching history to 7th graders) accelerated the peace process because of the death toll among soldiers on both sides of the line, but especially through the German ranks. The "Spanish" flu was particularly deadly amongst adults and teens (i.e. soldier-age men), and after the already heavy casualties due to the war, the German army had to scale back operations and the Allies were able to press the advantage. At least, that is my understanding, feel free to correct me Bufomander, as I have not yet read Barry's book.
post #114 of 185
Thread Starter 
Bytheby, have y'all seen the latest offering from Quirk Books (publishers of such classics as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters)?



Behold Android Karenina
post #115 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post

Oh, and Cathe, have you read the Wanderer? I think that's another one of hers that I read 5 or 6 years ago and liked.
Not yet but I'm working my way thru all of Creech's books.
post #116 of 185
Chasing Redbird by SHaron Creech

The style of this book reminded me of Walk Two Moons--there is also a lot in this book about the relationship of a young teen and her grandparents. In this book, Zinny's grandmother dies and Zinny thinks it's her fault and that her grandfather blames her. She becomes obsessed with clearing an old, overgrown trail to have something that will make her stand out from all of her brothers and sisters.
post #117 of 185
I found a box of old books from highschool at my mom's house, so I'm continuing on with the classics for now.

#5 The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

I am so glad I went back and read this book again. Now that I have children of my own, it was much more meaningful to me. I once saw Hester as a somewhat weak character (the naivity of youth I guess) but this time around I understood her sacrifice and her strength for what it was. Really wonderful book.

I think I will try and reserve Columbine after reading some of the discussions here. Sounds very interesting.
post #118 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
Bytheby, have y'all seen the latest offering from Quirk Books (publishers of such classics as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters)?



Behold Android Karenina
oh. my. is nothing sacred?

workjw: i have been thinking about the Scarlet Letter and wanting to re-read, too.

i really liked Walk Two Moons. i think i'll follow cathe through the whole creech collection.

tomorrow i pick up Karen Armstrong's The Case for God. i'll need lighter, quick novels after that!
post #119 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kangamitroo View Post
oh. my. is nothing sacred?
Not if it's in the public domain
post #120 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
Bytheby, have y'all seen the latest offering from Quirk Books (publishers of such classics as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters)?



Behold Android Karenina
I saw the Austen spoofs at the bookstores. I think they look hilarious. I'm a die-hard Austen fan, but I also like humor and parody. I'll probably read their version of P&P and S&S sometime this year. I'm sure it can't be any worse than some so-called sequels to Pride & Prejudice I've read that were written by modern authors. Some of those were really dreadful, dear reader. Oh what misery and woe! Those were not deserving of my good opinion.
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