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January 2010 Book Challenge - Page 7

post #121 of 185
9. Hoot by Carl Hiaasen

I saw this at the library and thought, "oh, there's that book I wanted to read" but I was actually thinking of Holes. I read it anyway... it was about a restaurant that tries to build on top of a site where some burrowing owls live and a group of kids get together to save the owls.
post #122 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
8. Looking for Alaska by John Green

I read this in almost one sitting late last night, even though I have to be up by 5. I couldn't put it down! I was a little distracted at the end because a previous library patron had cried smudgy mascara tears all over it and I could hardly see the text!
Paper Towns by Green is even better! I enjoyed it a lot, as did my 2 teens.

I read The Cellist of Sarajevo by Steven Galloway. It was a quick read, very moving, but somewhat flawed.
post #123 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post
Paper Towns by Green is even better! I enjoyed it a lot, as did my 2 teens.
Thanks! I hadn't read any other of his books so I'll put this one on my holds list next.
post #124 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
My understanding is that the flu pandemic (and this is based on my own research when I was teaching history to 7th graders) accelerated the peace process because of the death toll among soldiers on both sides of the line, but especially through the German ranks. The "Spanish" flu was particularly deadly amongst adults and teens (i.e. soldier-age men), and after the already heavy casualties due to the war, the German army had to scale back operations and the Allies were able to press the advantage. At least, that is my understanding, feel free to correct me Bufomander, as I have not yet read Barry's book.
Oh, fascinating! Now I don't have to read the book just for that tidbit

Do you ever feel like there isn't enough time to read everything you want to read?

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
Bytheby, have y'all seen the latest offering from Quirk Books (publishers of such classics as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters)?

Behold Android Karenina
Cool! I haven't read the Sea Monsters one yet. I'll add these two to my list. Zombies was fun, a little plodding in the middle for me, but fun.
post #125 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
My understanding is that the flu pandemic (and this is based on my own research when I was teaching history to 7th graders) accelerated the peace process because of the death toll among soldiers on both sides of the line, but especially through the German ranks. The "Spanish" flu was particularly deadly amongst adults and teens (i.e. soldier-age men), and after the already heavy casualties due to the war, the German army had to scale back operations and the Allies were able to press the advantage. At least, that is my understanding, feel free to correct me Bufomander, as I have not yet read Barry's book.
And in addition, some believe that Wilson got the flu during the process and that affected what he did or didn't push (and that maybe it's why some of the conditions were so harsh, creating an ideal climate for WWII to happen)

#10 The Flying Troutmans by Miriam Toews

#11 Book of a Thousand Days by Shannon Hale

#12 Homer and Langley by E.L. Doctorow
post #126 of 185
"Who Do I Lean On?" by Neta Jackson

Having ended the first book in this new series with a cliffhanger, Jackson assured that I would have to read this follow-up book.

Gabrielle, her mother and her mother's dog have "evicted" by her pathetic and narcissistic husband because Gabrielle is not proving to be the supportive (read:doormat trophy wife) he desires. Even worse, he has sent their two boys back to Virginia without her knowledge. So where do they end up? The very homeless shelter where she works -- and that seemed to ignite the already smoldering issues in her marriage. A significant moment in the book had me crying (don't want to give it away) and that doesn't happen often. I think because so many readers were upset by the first book's cliffhanger, Jackson made an effort to tie up most of the lose ends. And because you can't please everyone I will say I thought she worked a little too hard at it.
post #127 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
9. Hoot by Carl Hiaasen

I saw this at the library and thought, "oh, there's that book I wanted to read" but I was actually thinking of Holes. I read it anyway... it was about a restaurant that tries to build on top of a site where some burrowing owls live and a group of kids get together to save the owls.
sounds like it has potential. did you enjoy it?
post #128 of 185
Can I join? I probably won't be posting much. I only have a few minutes every day to read, so it takes me quite a while to finish a book.

I'm currently reading "The Hobbit" by JRR Tolkien.

post #129 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pajamajes View Post
Can I join? I probably won't be posting much. I only have a few minutes every day to read, so it takes me quite a while to finish a book.
Welcome and glad to have you here!
post #130 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by kangamitroo View Post
sounds like it has potential. did you enjoy it?
It had a good message and I think a preteen might enjoy it... it's just hard for me to get into YA fiction because everything is always black and white.
post #131 of 185
The Islands by Di Morrissey

Quote:
It's the psychedelic '70's and social conventions are being challenged. When Catherine Moreland from rural Australia goes on her first trip abroad, a handsome American naval officer sweeps her off her feet and she goes to live in the beautiful Hawaiian Islands with her new husband.

At first, the magic and loveliness of the Islands lead Catherine to believe she is living in paradise. However, as she learns more about the Islands, she begins to discover that paradise has a darker side. And when she meets a mystery man of the sea, as though hit by a tsunami her life is turned upside down and changed forever.
Talk about hyperbole. The description on the back of the book made a cliched, mostly boring stock-standard romance book sound like a thriller. It wasn't. There was some really nice descriptions of Hawaii in the '70's and surfing culture, but the characters were shallow and unoriginal, the plot was predictable, and the writing seemed self-conscious. Don't put this one on your must-read list. I wasted many hours of my life reading all 500 pages of it.


2010 Reading Goal - 50 books.
#1 - Child of the Prophecy #2 - Waiting for Daisy #3 - The Islands
post #132 of 185
The Weight of Silence by Heather Gudenkauf

Two families wake up early one morning to find their daughters have disappeared. The 7-year-old girls are best friends, one is a selective mute who hasn't spoken since her mother fell down the stairs and lost her baby. The story is told from multiple points of view, giving us information little by little of both past and present, until the mystery is finally solved. I found this book very well done, very suspenseful. I became so engrossed in the last half that I had to stay up to finish the book. One thing disappointed me, however--the epilogue at the end. I had enjoyed the book all the way to its conclusion but the epilogue went on to explain everything . . . it was unnecessary and makes readers feel stupid--like we couldn't figure that stuff out for ourselves. If there was information there the reader needed, it should have been woven into the story. I suggest reading this great book -- but skip the epilogue.
post #133 of 185
Real Life & Liars by Kristina Riggle

Quote:
The Zielinskis, the dysfunctional family of Riggle's delightful debut, have some problems, even if things at Mirabelle and Max's 35th anniversary party—thrown by their three adult children—at first seem peachy. Soon, though, the cracks appear: daughter Katya's stuck in a loveless marriage and saddled with three bratty kids. Son Ivan's a struggling songwriter who falls for all the wrong girls, and the youngest daughter, Irina, is a free-spirited 21-year-old, knocked up by a man twice her age. There's just no more room in their lives for another problem, but Mirabelle has a secret—she's dying of breast cancer.
I came at this book with a bias -- I went to college with the author and we worked at the school paper together. That is part of the reason I held off on reading it for so long -- what if I hated it? Fortunately, I didn't hate the book. At the start, I felt like the characters were too stereotypical -- the hippie professor, the distracted writer, the Type A first born, the unloved middle child (imagine "Jan" from The Brady Bunch) and the free-spirited youngest. It bothered me until I realized that by presenting these stereotypical characters, Riggle made it easier for all of us to relate to them. I particularly liked her dual use of the first person and third person narratives - something that took me a bit to get used to but worked really well. Like other reviewers, it was nice to see the book not end neatly tied up. Lately it seems like most new novels want to end with a neatly tied bow. And as Riggle points out that is not "real life" and those who pretend it is are just "liars".
post #134 of 185
The Wanderer by Sharon Creech

I think I liked this one even more than Walk Two Moons and Chasing Redbird! It was the story of a 13-yo girl who sails with her uncles and cousins from the US to England to visit her grandfather (Pompie). Sophie is such a great character -- she loves sailing and the ocean so passionately. However, she has some dark secrets in her past as well. She is adoped into this clan but doesn't admit she ever had other parents and though she has never met Pompie, she knows all of his stories--stories that no one else has ever heard. The story is told from Sophie and her cousin Cody's journals. Excellent, excellent book.
post #135 of 185
10. The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett
post #136 of 185
#13 The Many Lives and Sorrows of Josephine B. by Sandra Gulland

I got this as a rec from here.(historical fiction about Josephine Bonaparte, largely written as journal entries/letters) It was interesting, but I can't decide if it was compelling enough for me to go ahead and put the other two on hold.
post #137 of 185
#8 - Running with the Family by Michael Ondaatje

Ondaatje, who came to Canada from Sri Lanka when he was 11, returns as an adult with his family. He muses about family history, his visit back, and the landscape of the country where he was born. Like his novels, this is lyrical and non-linear, with beautiful descriptions and odd interludes. Unconventional, and interesting.
post #138 of 185
When you are engulfed in Flames, Sedaris

I thought some parts were funnier than others, but worth picking up if for the story on where he says "d'accord" to everything because he can't speak French, if nothing else.


Her Fearful Symmetry, Niffeneger
post #139 of 185
#5~World War Z, An Oral History of the Zombie War~Max Brooks
post #140 of 185
The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich

I loved this book--as did my third-grade daughter who is into all things Native American right now. This was the story of a 8-year-old Omakayas (Little Frog) and her family. We spend a year with them and get an idea of how they lived each season. This book reminded be a lot of the first in the Little House on the Prairie series--both the way it is written and the reading level. There was a lot of storytelling (most of it very spooky) and the good and bad of indian life. This would be a great readaloud.
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