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January 2010 Book Challenge - Page 8

post #141 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by jadedqueen123 View Post
#5~World War Z, An Oral History of the Zombie War~Max Brooks
I loved this book! How did you like it?
post #142 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jadedqueen123 View Post
#5~World War Z, An Oral History of the Zombie War~Max Brooks
Oooo ... what did you think of it?
post #143 of 185
"The Forest of Hands and Teeth" by Carrie Ryan

Quote:
Mary knows little about the past and why the world now contains two types of people: those in her village and the undead outside the fence, who prey upon the flesh of the living. The Sisters protect their village and provide for the continuance of the human race. After her mother is bitten and joins the Unconsecrated, Mary is sent to the Sisters to be prepared for marriage to her friend Harry. But then the fences are breached and the life she has known is gone forever. Mary; Harry; Travis, whom Mary loves but who is betrothed to her best friend; her brother and his wife; and an orphaned boy set out into the unknown to search for safety, answers to their questions, and a reason to go on living.

My first foray into zombie literature -- I wasn't sure what to expect especially from a YA novel. Mary is not a very likeable main character because she can't seem to put aside her own desires but perhaps that is her immaturity. She is, after all, just a child. I am hoping she develops and grows in the next book.

P.S. Zombies are way scarier than vampires. And no where near as cute ... unless you are into fetid flesh and missing body parts.
post #144 of 185
#6 The Stranger by Albert Camus

This book is about "an ordinary man who unwittingly gets drawn into a senseless murder on a sundrenched Algerian beach. Camus explored what he termed 'the nakedness of man faced with the absurd'".

This was an interesting little book. It was a quick read and one that left me thinking.
post #145 of 185
#9 The Unincorporated Man by Dani Kollin

This was a sci-fi yarn very, very like Robert Heinlein. With all the drawbacks of Heinlein, but still just as fun too.

The basic premise is that a man from our century, freezes himself, and is woken up 300 years from now into a future where everyone is incorporated. The government owns 5%, your parents 20%, and then you sell off shares to finance your education to various corporations. What does a man from the past make of this? Predictably, he refuses to incorporate, and the story is mostly about what that means for him and for the society he woke up into.
post #146 of 185
Thread Starter 
#1 Tales from Outer Suburbia
by Simon Tan

My review can be found HERE


#1 Tales from Outer Suburbia
post #147 of 185
saw this review of A Truth Universally Acknowledged, and i thought of all the Austen fans here
post #148 of 185
#14 Democracy at the Crossroads: Princes, Peasants, Poets, and Presidents in the Struggle for (and against) the Rule of Law by Craig S. Barnes
post #149 of 185
The Other Boleyn Girl (audio) by Philippa Gregory

This was an entertaining and quick read.
post #150 of 185
#15 The Everafter by Amy Huntley
got this from this thread. I liked it. YA fiction about a girl who has died and when, in the everafter, she comes across the objects she lost during life they reconnect her to events in her life.
Wow. whoever reviewed this originally did a much better job. I should've just cut and pasted theirs.
post #151 of 185
Working on ...
#16 The Swan Thieves by Elizabeth Kostova

The author of The Historian. Interesting so far. A man is put in a mental hospital after attempting to attack a painting in the National Gallery with a knife. So far it's been largely from the first person viewpoint of his doctor, but I think the viewpoint alternates throughout the book. Anyone else read this one yet?
post #152 of 185
Sunshine by Robin McKinley
I got into reading about vampires for the first time in my life last Spring when I picked up a copy of Twilight. I got hooked and read the whole saga and went on to the Sookie Stackhouse series which really bewilderd my long time friends and family!
After that I tried a few other vampire books but found them either too violent or trashy.

Sunshine is not one of those books!

The leading character is a woman named Rae, nick named Sunshine, who is a baker ( her specialty is cinnamon rolls!) working in her family's coffee house.
One day she's kidnapped by vampires, and chained to the wall of an abandoned house next to another prisoner who happens to be a starving vampire! The 2 prisoners escape together and form a strange and complicated alliance....... I don't want to give too much away!

What I liked is it is a well written and gripping storyand is hard to put down.
what I did not like is the ending felt unresolved and left me wanting to know more. Some of the different kinds of magic in the book were confusing for me but I would still recommend this book!
post #153 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbond View Post
I loved this book! How did you like it?
Really enjoyed it. Gripping to say the least. I am going to have to grab the first one from the library. I recommended it to my hubby so he is going to read it. He's not a hugely avid reader but I think he will really enjoy all the military terminology.
post #154 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jadedqueen123 View Post
Really enjoyed it. Gripping to say the least. I am going to have to grab the first one from the library. I recommended it to my hubby so he is going to read it. He's not a hugely avid reader but I think he will really enjoy all the military terminology.
Brad Pitt's production company is turning it into a film directed by the guy who directed Finding Neverland and Quantum of Solace with a screenplay by the guy who created Babylon 5 and wrote the script for the Angelina Jolie movie Changeling ... so, it ought to be interesting, to say the least.
post #155 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenifer76 View Post
"The Forest of Hands and Teeth" by Carrie Ryan




My first foray into zombie literature -- I wasn't sure what to expect especially from a YA novel. Mary is not a very likeable main character because she can't seem to put aside her own desires but perhaps that is her immaturity. She is, after all, just a child. I am hoping she develops and grows in the next book.

P.S. Zombies are way scarier than vampires. And no where near as cute ... unless you are into fetid flesh and missing body parts.

I was glad to read your review -- I just sent it back to the library! I have too many other books sitting on my shelf....
post #156 of 185
A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Believe it or not, I've never read this book. After we saw the play last weekend, I figured it was time. My dd's are reading it as well. I loved it.
post #157 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Believe it or not, I've never read this book. After we saw the play last weekend, I figured it was time. My dd's are reading it as well. I loved it.
I hope they enjoy it. This was one of my favorite books as a child--I would re-read it all the time.
post #158 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Believe it or not, I've never read this book. After we saw the play last weekend, I figured it was time. My dd's are reading it as well. I loved it.
I liked it when I was little, too and just re-read it with DD recently. Couldn't find my old copy, though, had to get it from the library.
post #159 of 185
"All We Ever Wanted Was Everything" by Janelle Brown

Quote:
In Brown's withering Silicon Valley satire, a family wakes up on a June day to realize that patriarch Paul's company has hit the big time with a phenomenal IPO. But instead of rejoicing about being newly rich, the family's three women each find themselves in the throes of a major crisis. Paul has fled with his new amour, who happens to be wife Janice's tennis partner. Desperate housewife Janice discovers the soothing power of the pool boy's drug stash and sinks into addiction and denial. Meanwhile, 20-something daughter Margaret learns the price of living a Hollywood lifestyle on an artsy hipster's budget—gargantuan credit card debt. Finally, 14-year-old Lizzie wades deeper and deeper into a sea of adolescent trouble without an adult to confide in. From the ashes of their California dreams, the three must learn to talk to each other instead of past each other, and build a new, slightly more realistic existence—but not without doses of revenge and hilarity

I admit to being attracted to this book initially based totally on the cover art. I even found the first few chapters to be intriguing but then it all seemed to fall apart midway.

Brown initially sets up what could be a good character study as well as a commentary on greed/materialism. However, as the plot moves on beyond the initial setup, she seems to become bored with it all. She starts to use her book as a platform to poke fun at all the things she disdains - which can be good when done well. Unfortunately, her manner ends up being childish and overdone.

By the end, the characters seemed like pathetic and grossly exaggerated versions of their original selves. Don't waste your time reading this book liked I did.
post #160 of 185
2) Peony In Love by Lisa See
Wow! I was blown away by this book. I liked See's previous book, Snow Flower and The Secret Fan, but Peony In Love is so much better. It's magical, lush, rich, heartbreaking, and beautiful. It's a love story and so much more. I'm going to read it again to get all the details.
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