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January 2010 Book Challenge - Page 2

post #21 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbond View Post
#2 The Lightning Thief: Percy Jackson and The Olympians by Rick Riordan
I saw the trailer for this at the cinema a few nights ago. It looked fun!
post #22 of 185
The Doom Machine by Mark Teague

This was a middle-grade novel -- quite long and involved however and very fun in a retro, sci-fi way. It takes place in the 50's where a mechanically-minded juvenile deliquent boy and a logically-minded scientists daughter girl have to save the earth from the spiderish aliens from Skreepia who want to take over the earth. It reminded me a bit of A Wrinkle in Time as they travel to over planets and meet some interesting aliens and cultures. Fun book once you get into it.
post #23 of 185
Since I am battling the after effects of a migraine my thoughts on the book aren't running beyond "it was good". Sorry.

#2 There's No Place Like Here by Cecelia Ahren

Quote:
Since Sandy Shortt's childhood classmate disappeared twenty years ago, Sandy has been obsessed with missing things. Finding what is lost becomes her single-minded goal--from the lone sock that vanishes in the washing machine to the car keys she misplaced. It's no surprise, then, that Sandy's life's work becomes finding people who have vanished from their loved ones. Sandy's family is baffled and concerned by her increasing preoccupation. Her parents can't understand her compulsion, and she pushes them away further by losing herself in the work of tracking down these missing people. She gives up her life in order to offer a flicker of hope to devastated families ... and escape the disappointments of her own.

Jack Ruttle is one of those devastated people. It's been a year since his brother Donal vanished into thin air, and he has enlisted Sandy Shortt to find him. But before she is able to offer Jack the information he so desperately needs, Sandy goes missing too...and Jack now finds himself searching for his brother and the one woman who understood his pain.

One minute Sandy is jogging through the park, the next, she can't figure out where she is. The path is obscured. Nothing is familiar. A clearing up ahead reveals a camp site, and it's there that Sandy discovers the impossible: she has inadvertently stumbled upon the place-- and people--she's been looking for all her life, a land where all the missing people go. A world away from her loved ones and the home she ran from for so long, Sandy soon resorts to her old habit again, searching. Though this time, she is desperately trying to find her way home...

I love the concept that the things we lose in life -- pens, socks and even people -- have all found their way to a place of lost things. That the people who find themselves there set up their own society with established rules makes it even more fascinating.
post #24 of 185
I love to read (although I'm very slow) and I'd love to join the thread. I am in 2 bookclubs, even though I don't really have the time, because I love books and I just can't leave anything. Reading slowly, with 3 boys 3-9, I'm just hopeful to read my 24 books read this year, besides the stuff I read to the boys. I enjoy supporting and encouraging reading and I've already read some interesting descriptions for future selections so I'm sure that I'll enjoy the thread. For January I am supposed to read Crazy for the Storm by Norman Ollestad and The Help by Kathryn Stockett. I haven't started either yet, so I'll post numbered reviews later. Good reading everyone. )
post #25 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
Happy New Year everyone . . . it's also my anniversary today. Twelve years for dh and me!

Looking forward to another year of sharing books with all of you.
Happy Anniversary!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbond View Post
Well, this one should probably go into December's thread, but I'm also excited about a new year of books. My goal for this year is 100, which I just made at the wire this year.

Also, today is my birthday!
And Happy Birthday!

Lots of New Year's celebrations around here!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mammastar2 View Post
#2 - Matilda by Roald Dahl

Catching up on books my daughter says I have to read! Good, dark fun.

I love that dark Roald Dahl stuff. It's fun isn't it?

So strange to be starting back at #1 again!!!! My goal last year was 75 I think? And I read 87 all told. I think less non-fiction is the key. I decided I'm not going to read a bunch of non-fiction that makes me angry or sad (like Fast Food Nation or things like that). My goal this year is fun! And my numbers goal, well, why not make it 90 since I got pretty close this year!

#1 The Vortex by Esther and Jerry Hicks

Another book in the series about the Law of Attraction brought to us by "Abraham". This one is about relationships and how to get the best of out of our relationships with each other.



ETA: actually, I should say, my goal is to finish all those piles of books next to my bed. i have about 5 misc stacks of books about 6 or 7 books high on, under and next to my dresser. that'd be some nice clutter to clear away!
post #26 of 185
I should have said - congratulations on birthdays and anniversaries, as applicable!

And #3 - On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan

Having read and absolutely loved Atonement in December, I wanted to give this one a whirl as well. It is more of a novella, a brief novel focusing on the wedding night gone rather awfully wrong of the inexperienced and British-ly reticent Edward and Florence in 1962. While it's not Atonement, I did enjoy it. The ending at first felt a bit tagged on, but I think it actually got to the heart of the point of the book, on further reflection. I'm quite enjoying McEwan.
post #27 of 185
I just finished The Last Apprentice: Curse of the Bane by Joseph Delaney. I'm loving these books so far.

I also read While My Sister Sleeps by Barbara Delinsky and finished a book I started last year The Battle of the Labryinth the 4th book in the Percy Jackson series. I'd recommend both of them, although not the first one if you are avoiding sad themes.
post #28 of 185
The Ivory and the Horn by Charles de Lint

The 4th book of the Urban Fantasy series and is a collection of 15 stories, one is original, set in the city of Newford.
http://www.sfsite.com/charlesdelint/ivory-desc01.htm
I have really enjoyed everything I have read from De Lint up till now
post #29 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammastar2 View Post
I should have said - congratulations on birthdays and anniversaries, as applicable!

And #3 - On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan

Having read and absolutely loved Atonement in December, I wanted to give this one a whirl as well. It is more of a novella, a brief novel focusing on the wedding night gone rather awfully wrong of the inexperienced and British-ly reticent Edward and Florence in 1962. While it's not Atonement, I did enjoy it. The ending at first felt a bit tagged on, but I think it actually got to the heart of the point of the book, on further reflection. I'm quite enjoying McEwan.
I'm quite taken with Ian McEwan myself. Saturday is my favorite so far of his books. I won Atonement in the read-a-thon and it's sitting on my shelf waiting for me.
post #30 of 185
The Scapegoat by Daphne Du Maurier

I found this at a thrift shop and since I loved Rebecca and her book of short stories, I couldn't pass it up. It was very different than those but very enjoyable. A man in France meets his double who drugs him and takes his stuff and the man is stuck stepping into the life of the double. The double's life is in quite a mess and he makes it into even more of one but then ends up really liking it . . . but will he be able to keep this new life?
post #31 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
The Scapegoat by Daphne Du Maurier

I found this at a thrift shop and since I loved Rebecca and her book of short stories, I couldn't pass it up. It was very different than those but very enjoyable. A man in France meets his double who drugs him and takes his stuff and the man is stuck stepping into the life of the double. The double's life is in quite a mess and he makes it into even more of one but then ends up really liking it . . . but will he be able to keep this new life?
Ooh ... that sounds like a great book! I'll have to keep my eye out for it.
post #32 of 185
Hillbilly Gothic by Adrienne Martini

Quote:
Martini, a journalist and college professor, summons her blackest comedic chops to rehash her free-fall into postpartum depression—and the newfound understanding of her own upbringing that buoys her back up. Still mired in the oppressive Appalachia that chafed at her in childhood, she checks herself into the Knoxville psychiatric hospital shortly after giving birth, acquiescing to the "hillbilly Gothic patchwork" of suicides and manic-depression that scourge her family history. As her newborn daughter battles jaundice, her mother hovers intrusively as she awaits the mystical ability to breast-feed; Martini ponders her maternal fitness with a panicked despair nimbly rendered with dry humor and candid self-appraisal. Her misery, so jarringly at odds with the "bundle of joy" in her arms, throws open a window on her own mother's severe depression, helping Martini to make peace with her family and its legacies.
I could understand Martini's experience one hundred percent having gone through my own battle with postpartum depression. Even down to coming from a family where both mental illness and the associated evils run rampant.

Martini's account of her Appalachian background and family's mental illness is not pretty. Her own descent into "madness" actually made me physically hurt for her. That's not to say she sets herself up to be pitied. Far from it. She recognizes that her story is a common one and because there is still a stigma associated with all mental illness, especially postpartum depression and its darker sister postpartum psychosis, it is a necessary story. I can't say that I recommend this book to everyone - its a tough story to read. But if you do choose to read it I don't think you will be disappointed.
post #33 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
I'm quite taken with Ian McEwan myself. Saturday is my favorite so far of his books. I won Atonement in the read-a-thon and it's sitting on my shelf waiting for me.
I loved Atonement! Saturday was the first one of his I read, and I wasn't mad about it, found his sloooooow looooong descriptions of every.single.detail. maddening - but I want to re-read it now I've enjoyed others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
The Scapegoat by Daphne Du Maurier

I found this at a thrift shop and since I loved Rebecca and her book of short stories, I couldn't pass it up. It was very different than those but very enjoyable. A man in France meets his double who drugs him and takes his stuff and the man is stuck stepping into the life of the double. The double's life is in quite a mess and he makes it into even more of one but then ends up really liking it . . . but will he be able to keep this new life?
I'll keep an eye out for this one! I loved Rebecca too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenifer76 View Post
Hillbilly Gothic by Adrienne Martini



I could understand Martini's experience one hundred percent having gone through my own battle with postpartum depression. Even down to coming from a family where both mental illness and the associated evils run rampant.

Martini's account of her Appalachian background and family's mental illness is not pretty. Her own descent into "madness" actually made me physically hurt for her. That's not to say she sets herself up to be pitied. Far from it. She recognizes that her story is a common one and because there is still a stigma associated with all mental illness, especially postpartum depression and its darker sister postpartum psychosis, it is a necessary story. I can't say that I recommend this book to everyone - its a tough story to read. But if you do choose to read it I don't think you will be disappointed.
This sounds amazing, I'll look for it.

And, er, #4 - Harry the Poisonous Centipede by Lynne Reid Banks, because my daughter wanted me to. Now I get to read the sequel. It's cute, not amazing. It's fairly modern, I think, so I was a bit surprised that the mother centipede administers a severe spanking to Harry's friend. Odd, that. Dd loves the book, though.
post #34 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
The Scapegoat by Daphne Du Maurier

I found this at a thrift shop and since I loved Rebecca and her book of short stories, I couldn't pass it up. It was very different than those but very enjoyable. A man in France meets his double who drugs him and takes his stuff and the man is stuck stepping into the life of the double. The double's life is in quite a mess and he makes it into even more of one but then ends up really liking it . . . but will he be able to keep this new life?
It's funny how surprisingly different their "other" books can be. We all have to read "the classics" in school, but when you pick up a lesser known/read book, it makes you wonder why they chose for us the book they did. Last summer I read Villette, and found it much more engrossing than Jane Eyre.
post #35 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenifer76 View Post
Hillbilly Gothic by Adrienne Martini
Sounds intense.
post #36 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
Sounds intense.
But she is funny which sort of softens the edges. If that makes sense.
post #37 of 185
i'm in... i have stacks and stacks of books around that i need to get at and this could really help motivate me :-)) goal is 30 for the year since i read other materials along with my books... and of course all the kid books we read every night.
post #38 of 185
#3 Godmother: The Secret Cinderella Story by Carolyn Turgeon

I'm still not sure, 2 days after the fact, how I feel about this one. I liked the premise, which is the what if the Fairy Godmother in Cinderella had gone after the Prince herself?

But, the ending in this one, I think ruined the book for me. Although, it wasn't really just the ending. The book also felt like a mish-mash of fairylore that tried to throw everything together without any structure or glue.

Some of the descriptions, though, were beautiful. So, I don't know. I'm not sure that I'd recommend it, but it read fast so it's not like it's a huge time sink.
post #39 of 185
Where Do I Go? (Yada Yada House of Hope) by Neta Jackson

Quote:
Gabrielle Fairbanks has nearly lost touch with the carefree, spirited young woman she was shen she married her husband sixteen years ago. But when the couple moves to Chicago to accommodate Philip's ambition, Gabby longs for the chance to find real purpose in her own life.

A chance encounter with a homeless woman suddenly opens a dooor she never expected. The women of Manna House Women's Shelter need a Program Director--and she has the right credentials. Gabby's in her element, feeling God's call on her life at last, even though Philip doesn't like the changes he sees in her. But she never anticipated his ultimatum: quit your job at the shelter or risk divorce and losing custody of our sons.
Let me start out by saying that the character of Phillip is totally over the top. I can't imagine anyone that egomaniacal who isn't a Hollywood star or GQ model. His treatment of Gabrielle had me seething and I am anxious to see how Jackson rights this situation in the next book.

Overall, its not a bad book. Its a new offshoot of the Yada Yada series called "House of Hope". It has that typical Christian literature feel to it -- not really ground-breaking or particularly earth shattering. Just comfortable and easy. That's not a criticism because sometimes that is all I am looking for in a book. I think if you like this genre, you will be pleased with the book.
post #40 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbond View Post
I got Nurtureshock to read myself, but my DH took it, and I haven't gotten it back from him yet. He's been very engaged with it.

#2 The Lightning Thief: Percy Jackson and The Olympians by Rick Riordan
A YA novel with the premise that the Greek Gods are real. Demi-gods are common, and Percy is one of them. This was pretty good. A quick read, which is what I need right now, and I can see that as an 8 or 9 year old, I would have really loved this book.
Yeah, my DH definitely enjoyed it as well.
and i like percy jackson - something about the humor in them resonates with me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by naturegirl7 View Post
The most recent books I have read include (they are kiddo books so I will spare you the summary - unless you want to hear about them!):
the Phantom Tollbooth by (gotta double check the spelling) - LOVE LOVE LOVE this book, even better as an adult. So witty!
SuperFudge by Judy Blume
The Mouse and the Motorcycle by Beverly Cleary

Tonight we started The Egypt Game - Zilpha Keatley Snyder, haven't read it before but I loved her Below the Root triology as a kid myself. Excited to read this one too.
Welcome! The Phantom Tollbooth and Mouse and the Motorcycle are hits around here, too. What are you thinking of The Egypt Game? What would you think about it for a 5 1/2 yo with a giant attention span for reading and a strong vocab?

#2 Fire by Kristin Cashore
This is the companion book to Graceling. I started it once, took it back to the library, got it out again and read it on the second checkout. I can't decide if i give it 3 or 4 stars out of five... Young adult.
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