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Does your school serve chocolate milk? - Page 2

post #21 of 96
As a kid, I was told to get white milk or ask for water. I guess I *could* have rebelled & gotten chocolate but just didn't. I don't remember not being allowed to have chocolate being a big deal to me at all. Perhaps you could let the teacher or supervisor know that your kid gets white milk only?
post #22 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxye View Post
Just FYI, Most chocolate milk also has Red 40 and most of the same icky ingredients...
I am an avid reader of chocolate milk labels (because I am always searching from brands that use real sugar rather than HFCS....WAWA rocks!), and I've never seen Red #40 on any label

Also, just to keep things in perspective, 8 oz of choc milk has about 25 grams of sugar (reg milk has about 12). A cup of breyers fruit on the bottom yogurt has 40 grams of sugar.
post #23 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunshineJ View Post
Per 1 cup serving 2% milk has 122 calories, 5 grams of fat (3 saturated), vs. the chocolate lowfat which has 157 calories and 3g fat (2 saturated). You're talking an average of an additional 6300 calories (1.8 lbs)over the course of 9 months. I don't think that's really causing a childhood obesity epidemic. Now the FOOD the school serves may be another story!

However though here's the thing. In a lot of areas, schools pretty much feel they have to offer a lot of high cal/fat options (plus due to state and district contracts they are limited by what they can purchase depending on what's offered by the distributer). Many children in poverty level homes (and that number keeps increasing the past few years) may not get dinner, breakfast or snacks at home. Not saying that poor people won't feed their children (of course most certainly do!), but food options can be more limited for some, plus you have the people who think a little bag of Doritos is a great dinner, etc. The nutrition they get at school may be the ONLY nutrition they get for the day. And if the only way to get a child to consume the calcium in milk is to make it chocolate, then that's what they'll do. As parents it's our job to teach our children our beliefs, whether it be religious, behavioural related or involving food. Kids are exposed to differences and temptations every day, and we can't make them all disappear - nor should we try to. That doesn't mean it's not worthwhile to try to improve the menu selections at the school level, but I don't think singling out chocolate milk is going to have a real impact other than resulting in some children not drinking milk at school at all.
You are making the assumption that a child will only drink one carton of chocolate milk per lunch. I've spent plenty of time in my kids' elementary school cafeteria and let me tell you, there's a lot more chocolate milk being consumed than one carton per child per lunch. As a PP said, the lunch program in my school district works off of a debit-style system. So kids have the option to keep "buying" things until the money runs out. They can go up and buy chips, fruit snacks, multiple cartons of chocolate milk, cookies the size of their faces, etc. I've told/asked my kids to buy skim milk or drink water. But real-world app of that request is the purchase of chocolate milk.
post #24 of 96
oh, I know for certain my kids' school choc milk doesn't have red 40 in it b/c I read the ingredients at the thanksgiving meal and was commenting about it to DH. Some chocolate syrups do, though.

(sorry, didn't quote.)
post #25 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieA View Post
. As a PP said, the lunch program in my school district works off of a debit-style system. So kids have the option to keep "buying" things until the money runs out. They can go up and buy chips, fruit snacks, multiple cartons of chocolate milk, cookies the size of their faces, etc. I've told/asked my kids to buy skim milk or drink water. But real-world app of that request is the purchase of chocolate milk.
Maybe that is the actual problem, then, and not the chocolate milk?
post #26 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnmama View Post
Maybe that is the actual problem, then, and not the chocolate milk?
Well on the surface, I would agree with you that the actual problem is the debit-style program rather than the chocolate milk. But really what is happening is that we, as grownups, are asking small children to make rational, reasonable decisions that they are just not capable of. I feel that part of my job as the grownup caring for children is to help them work through why or why not certain food choices are being offered. For example, my kids would eat dessert every night if given the chance to make that decision on their own. However as the grownup, it's my job to say "you had ice cream this afternoon with Daddy so we are not going to have candy after dinner tonight." By doing so, I hope to impart the idea of moderation to them and respect for what their bodies can handle. I think it's unreasonable to expect a kindergartner to say "You know, I've already had chocolate milk twice this week, I think I'll choose skim milk today instead." So the more reasonable solution to me seems to be to remove those choices that get easily abused.
post #27 of 96
So do away with the real problem- the debit card system. Then it can't be abused.
post #28 of 96
I have to say, I love the pre-paid account aspect b/c I know how much money they have, and don't have to worry about sending in cash every day. That said, it can get used quickly. Bottled water are .40 cents, or whatever, and even though my kids have re-useable SS bottles, they often buy them. or, they go and get breakfast when they have already ate at home - which is fine, if they are still hungry, except I don't budget for it ahead of time so then I am always having to look and see where all their lunch money went so quickly.

But really, all I have to do is talk to them about it. I remind DD water costs money, and I'd prefer her to only do it X amount of times per week. I would do the same for breakfast (but it's only .75 cents) if it bothered me. The water does, b/c they have their own and there's no need to buy it bottled all the time.
post #29 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieA View Post
I think it's unreasonable to expect a kindergartner to say "You know, I've already had chocolate milk twice this week, I think I'll choose skim milk today instead." So the more reasonable solution to me seems to be to remove those choices that get easily abused.
I guess I just don't see one small portion of choc milk with lunch each day as abuse, unless the lunch is otherwise full of sugar and empty calories. What's happened to buying a complete lunch, with an entree, a fruit/veg, and one milk? My dd's school still has that. On the days she buys, she always asks if she is allowed to buy anything additional. I usually say no
post #30 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieA View Post
You are making the assumption that a child will only drink one carton of chocolate milk per lunch. I've spent plenty of time in my kids' elementary school cafeteria and let me tell you, there's a lot more chocolate milk being consumed than one carton per child per lunch. As a PP said, the lunch program in my school district works off of a debit-style system. So kids have the option to keep "buying" things until the money runs out. They can go up and buy chips, fruit snacks, multiple cartons of chocolate milk, cookies the size of their faces, etc. I've told/asked my kids to buy skim milk or drink water. But real-world app of that request is the purchase of chocolate milk.
Imo, the option to buy extras is the real problem, not whether or not the milk is flavored. We had a pre-paid system in my small, private school when I was growing up. It was not card, though, (like it is there now) but tickets. One ticket got you one full meal. Beverage choices were whole milk, 2% milk, or chocolate milk (dont know fat content). You could only get juice if you had a dr's note that you were allergic to dairy. Then, you got the whole meal being served that day. That was it, no option to buy extras. With this system, I see no problem w/ kids drinking chocolate milk. Some kids will tell you that they do not like white milk anyway. I rarely serve dd flavored milk, but I drink it every morning! I would rather see her drink 3 glasses of flavored milk per day than none at all. Nowadays, of course my old school has switched to the card system and they offer all kinds of extras. My mom still teaches there and she hates it b/c some kids will just eat nachos for lunch.

I really really do not see the point of offering children all of these options to buy additional junky food at lunch time. I can understand offering extra HEALTHY food to buy b/c some kids need more food, but not nachos, cookies, chips, mini donuts, etc. We had that in high school & I think by then kids are old enough to have that freedom (we also had a salad bar then, too). If you are old enough to drive a car, you are old enough to choose soda and a cookie for lunch, even if the choice is not optimal. I think it's irresponsible of a school to present a six-year-old w/ these kinds of food choices. Hello, of course they will buy all the junk, they are so little! I can easily see the nutritional value of drinking a flavored milk, but not in eating a pack of mini donuts!!!
post #31 of 96
Also, do you have to use the debit system? What about the families who don't have the money upfront to load the card? What if you can't afford for your dc to overspend? What if overspending the first 3 days means no money for lunch the last 2 days? Who is responsible?

My dd's school pushes the card system, but I just send her with money the rare days she buys. They still accept money, although they don't advertise it. I only send her with enough money for one full lunch.
post #32 of 96
I agree that it's the uncontrolled debiting for elementary students that seems to be the primary problem.

Our school serves chocolate milk. But they only get one lunch, and one drink. Not a problem. Since I don't like the menu (typical prison fare meats and prepackaged processed stuff because of lack of adequate kitchen facilities to actually prepare meals from scratch) I solve the problem by not having my kids buy lunch, they can pick one day a month to buy, but they have to proactively circle that day on the caledar and put their initials on it. Most of the time they forget or don't find anythign interesting.

I would focus on changing the debit system to one meal, not a bunch of sides, for the elementary kids. To me that seems like that would actually solve a problem, vs. a feel good but pragmatically meaningless cosmetic change. Of course, I am assuming that there are more "treats" for purchase other than chocolate milk.
post #33 of 96
We never had any kind of choices we could make other than milk type until high school. In our new district, the only choices the elementary school children have are the option to substitude the entree for a salad or the sandwich of the week (i.e. ham and cheese) and what type of milk to get. The debit system with cookies, etc. available sounds like a nightmare disaster on the elementary level and I'm floored that any district or school would think that a good idea! But seriously though, I'm sitting here with the month's school menu in front of me. Every day the kids have a snack. For most kids it's the "breakfast menu". Todays calorie content for the snack is 551 with 18 g of fat. Tomorrow's has 636 calories with 20 grams of fat. They won't disclose the calories for the lunches, but for example today's lunch was chicken pot pie, biscuit, peas, fruit and milk. Tomorrow for lunch they're offering Cheesebread dunkers with pizza sauce, veggies, fruit and milk. I'm going to go out on a limb here and suggest the extra 35 calories per carton of chocolate milk are NOT the problem. (Sad thing is, the food here is MUCH better than our old district! At least they aren't doing fruit snacks and fruity pebbles every day!) Keep in mind that if a child goes back for more milk and has even 3 cartons, they're still getting a LOT of extra calories from that regardless what type or flavor it is. At that point you have bigger issues than what flavor of milk a kid is drinking.
post #34 of 96
see, we have a debit system (and they don't have a physical card, the lunch ladies have a computer and they deduct using the child's name) but there aren't extra goodies, besides milk/juice/water. They have 3-5 main entrees to choose from (always one at least is vegetarian), and then a variety of side dishes. While they are not all whole foods and made from scratch (they do have whole wheat bread, and fresh fruit and veggies, though) the food is a ton better than when I was a kid and we got whatever was being served slopped on the plate. However, even as a kid, I recall the option of buying Little Debbie snacks and similar, and I do remember not eating the hot lunch - only the junk.

Sooo, my DS buying nasty strawberry milk everyday doesn't really bother me as much in the grand scheme of it all. If he were able to get cookies, candy bars, chips, etc., using his lunch account -- I would not be happy, and would talk to the school about putting a hold on his funds somehow so that he could only buy real food. That said, they do have popcorn once a week to buy after lunch from the PTO, and sometimes treats like suckers, too. But they are always available at recess time, and not deductible from their lunch funds.
post #35 of 96
A treat is no longer a treat when it's given every day.


When I was in school, chocolate milk was only offered on Fridays.
post #36 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by moondiapers View Post
A treat is no longer a treat when it's given every day. .
Why not?

I enjoy certain treats every day (food and otherwise!)
post #37 of 96
The kids have a choice of 2%, whole, vanilla, chocolate and occasionally strawberry. & orange juice in the morning. I have absolutely no problem with that and love they have so many choices.

If they took away the choices my kids would go thirsty since neither will drink regular milk. They will not drink water either so that leaves chocking down food dry, not acceptable.
post #38 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnmama View Post
Why not?

I enjoy certain treats every day (food and otherwise!)
Treats are something special....and when something becomes common place it just doesn't seem special anymore.
post #39 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxye View Post
Just FYI, Most chocolate milk also has Red 40 and most of the same icky ingredients...
Then it's an issue of the overall quality of the item, not the simple fact that it's chocolate. The chocolate milk I serve DS on a regular basis contains: organic low fat milk (I wish it was whole milk, but can't find that; when we make it at home, I use whole,) organic cocoa, organic cane sugar.

If I were going to fight for better milk in schools: I'd leave the chocolate option that is actually going to be consumed, and focus instead on trying to get high quality milk into schools. Preferably organic, but at least hormone free. I'd also try to get soymilk added as an option for those of us who are lactose intolerant.

I worry much less about a few extra calories from some cocoa and sugar than the nasty hormones cows are given.
post #40 of 96
the milk served in our schools (and mostly all the schools in our local area, as the same place holds the contract like, everywhere, schools hospitals and other institutions), has been hormone free since 2007
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