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Adoption Subsidy Negotiations - Page 2

post #21 of 29

That may have been the case before, but with tightening budgets it's much harder for kids to qualify.  When I adopted my son in 2008, all foster-adopted children in my state received subsidy.  I adopted my DD last month and the social worker had to use a form with a fairly complex points system.  DD almost didn't qualify but her being a minority (she's half-Hispanic) pushed over the line.  In many states, children are now having to be "older" than before and/or have more advanced special needs.

post #22 of 29

Yeah, you should qualify for the $2000 non-recurring expenses subsidy, since in Ohio, they are fairly leniant about that (in Ohio, you can get one for an international special needs infant/toddler adoption, which is rare for a state to allow).  You can also apply for PASSS funding from your local J&FS office.  We have PASSS funding for our daughter to pay for her RAD therapies, but they will also cover all types of special needs things, and it's available for any special needs adoption--there are no other requirements other than having a special needs adopted child.  That pays for up to $10,000 a year in services (we use far less than that, but it's there if we need it).

 

I would definitely try to talk to whoever you can in the adoption department of the Job and Family Services office because these grants are state mandated and from what you posted, you qualify. 

post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamarhu View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by lauren View Post
It is my perception that it is getting much harder to get adoption subsidy regardless of state, because it is tied in part to federal money. Not sure if I have that completely correct.
In my state they are saying it is because the state is so bad off right now - I think it is only part federal money.


That is what we were told, federal guidelines and the state economy.

For us, a letter from her healthcare provider specifying her diagnosis was what we needed to get the subsidy. It was really touch and go if we would get it or not. We were adopting regardless and they knew that and that may have hurt, who knows. In the end, we got the subsidy, they also offered us vendor payments, but I have no idea what those can be used for or how to take advantage of them. They also did give us Medicaid until 18, but we only use as a secondary insurance.

They said daycare is never offered after adoption.

post #24 of 29

Carly, I spent a lot of time with the criteria sheet and P's adoption worker.  I bet it was less of them "not wanting" to offer subsidy and more of them "having their hands tied" before you got medical documentation.  I've know the people at my DSS office for over five years and the belt tightening was difficult for them to accept, too.  They liked being able to offer subsidy to the majority of adoptive families and it was so hard to go back to families who were on the adoptive track and tell them that their children no longer qualified.  Polliwog almost didn't qualify.  But, they really have to use the new scoring system or risk being cited in an audit. 

 

Did they send you the list of qualifying services when you were deemed eligible for vendor payments?  If not, I'll scan mine and send it to you.  It won't cover much in M's case, since I would assume that her services would be covered by insurance.  Chris's is much broader because of his IEP but even still, it won't be as easy to use as it was before.  His will cover tutoring if I decide to get it, a smaller or specialized after-school program if needed, and could even go toward his private school tuition if he gets in and still would benefit from a smaller and hands-on classroom.

post #25 of 29

We just adopted our two year old daughter who we have had since birth on 12/16/10. The subsidy negotiation went on for 3 weeks and was very draining for me. We were initally offered 75.00 and the medicaid card and went back and forth untill we ended up at 395.00 and medicaid card. A great resource is a man named Tim Hanlon that you can look up on line and email. He wrote our a 6 page needs document for me at no cost and stated all laws and regulation to each need. He is retired from franklin county and knows all the laws. He was a very helpful resource. If you don't feel that you get what your child should let it go to mediation and have someone besides your county decided. You need to fight for your child and dont be scared to decline thier offer and push for more.   

post #26 of 29

I am still just in the licensing process, are we talking the regular subsidy or isn't there additional subsidies available. I am still so confused about how this works, though the SW that led our class are very nice they didn't clarify this at all. All I know is here in Riverside County, CA all adopted children continue to receive the same payments as they did in foster care, and MediCal through age 18. Am I mistaken that there *may* be additional subsidies available for special needs, sibling groups, etc that matchers could not place without the additional subsidy? We have put down to take 2 children, but if DH will stretch on that I would be open to taking more..and additional help would be welcome. 

post #27 of 29

I wouldn't think that there would be more than that unless the child/ren had significant special needs. The factors you listed are what qualify the children for the subsidy in the first place.

post #28 of 29

I don't know if this helps:

 

http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/f_subsid.cfm

post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polliwog View PostCarly, I spent a lot of time with the criteria sheet and P's adoption worker.  I bet it was less of them "not wanting" to offer subsidy and more of them "having their hands tied" before you got medical documentation.  I've know the people at my DSS office for over five years and the belt tightening was difficult for them to accept, too.  They liked being able to offer subsidy to the majority of adoptive families and it was so hard to go back to families who were on the adoptive track and tell them that their children no longer qualified.  Polliwog almost didn't qualify.  But, they really have to use the new scoring system or risk being cited in an audit.


You are right, my post came across wrong, they do have their hands tied and can only do so much with their new guidelines. The medical documentation sealed the deal for M and they were happy to process once they had that. I am sure the tightening is making their jobs harder, too, as M's former foster mom went and adopted a subsidy-eligible child after giving her to us because she couldn't afford to adopt M.

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