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Learning Disabilities - rely on school or go with private testing? - Page 2

post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
ENT appointment achieved! January 26.

We are using the ABeCeDarian program. It's a targeted phonics program that's supposed to be awesome for kids who don't pick up phonics naturally. We've actually had a measure of success with it - I have been able to get him to blend sounds together, which is a first!

But it is so hard for him. The earlier lessons were easier but now that we're moving into more difficult (for him) sounds it's becoming pretty clear that he confuses a number of sounds.
post #22 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
Kids with reoccurring ear infections go for periods of time when they don't hear well, which makes phonemic awareness very difficult for them, which makes reading very difficult for them. They can also be kids who have fluid in their ears often without having infection, which effects their hearing but doesn't have any other symptoms. Tubes are the best thing.

My advice is :

ENT
audiologist
speech therapy

Small speech problems might or might not be grown out of, depending on what is causing them. I suspect that the problems he has with reading are related to his problems with speech and the root cause is what he has/hasn't heard over the years. It most likely isn't something that he will just out grow.

The good news is that he is REALLY young and there is plenty of time to help him get past this stuff. He's going to be in a very different place with all this stuff this time next year.

What reading program are you currently using?

My DD's speech therapist gave us homework each week of simple things we could do together to help -- things like having her watch my mouth while I made a sound we were working on, and then look in the mirror while she tries to make it.

BTW, my DD had a very similar background and is 13 now and speaks clearly and reads on a college level. Kids get past this kind of stuff. We did lots of different therapies and worked with her a lot at home.
IIRC, you were homeschooling your DD when she was DS's age (6.5) right?

My concern is that he's not getting the support he needs at school. If we get him a specific diagnosis, the school will have to slow down and work with him where he is.

He is literally being left behind in almost every literacy area in school. It's hard on him. And his teacher seems to have her head stuck firmly in the sand.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisac77 View Post
IIRC, you were homeschooling your DD when she was DS's age (6.5) right?

My concern is that he's not getting the support he needs at school. If we get him a specific diagnosis, the school will have to slow down and work with him where he is.

He is literally being left behind in almost every literacy area in school. It's hard on him. And his teacher seems to have her head stuck firmly in the sand.
I was homeschooling DD at the time. I agree that your son is not currently getting the support he needs. A specific dianhosis is ALWAYS a good thing!
post #24 of 27
Get the wrightlaw books out of the library and start reading about your rights and how the process works. They will be your best friends.

But yes, it sounds like you need to have a complete assessment. Once you contact your school and request an assessment in writing, they have a certain amount of days to comply. After they do their stuff, then you can do your own testing (and if I remember right, they have to pay for it? or is that state by state?), and they have to take your private testing into consideration when setting up your child's IEP (this is new, before they could just tell you NO).

We had testing done at our local Children's hospital, and their were scholarships to pay for it. Very helpful!

Just don't let it go. Keep pushing until you get what you all need.
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdahlgrd View Post
After they do their stuff, then you can do your own testing (and if I remember right, they have to pay for it? or is that state by state?),
they don't have to pay for private testing where we live, but the right private person will make recommendations and advocate for a child.

So if a parent only goes with the school option, they are kinda stuck with what the school offers, but if the parent has a private evaluation as well, they have some one else saying what is in the child's best interests and pushing to make it happen.
post #26 of 27
wow. thank you for this thread -- I learnt so much!
post #27 of 27
I came across these links today - maybe they'll be useful:

Having Your Child Tested for Learning Disabilities Outside of School:
http://www.readingrockets.org/article/4529

What to Do If You Suspect That Your Child Has a Learning Disability:
http://www.readingrockets.org/article/19293

Evaluation: What Does it Mean for Your Child?:
http://www.readingrockets.org/article/20450

Tests and Measurements for the Parent, Teacher, Advocate and Attorney
http://www.readingrockets.org/article/6026


I do agree that seeing the ENT is the best first step.
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