or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at School › Montessori › Ongoing Montessori homeschooling thread?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ongoing Montessori homeschooling thread? - Page 2

post #21 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenfl View Post
I ordered from Montessori Outlet. They seemed to have the best balance of low prices and good reviews. But I think everyone comes to a different conclusion on what supplier to go with depending on what they're looking for.

I got the basic, lower-case set. I only got a quick glance at them last night (I unpacked the Sensorial materials before bed, and tonight I'll do the reset), but I was pretty impressed.

Montessori Outlet backordered the small numerical rods, stand for the red rods, and color tablets #3. I have no idea how long until those arrive.

I've got lots of pictures of the unpacking up on my blog! Overall, I was really pleased. The pink tower and brown stair feel very substantial, and all of the materials just feel special.

Good to hear. The maps we have and the sandpaper letters on their way are from Montessori Outlet. If we order more materials, it will probably be from them. I observed at a school the other day (a recent expansion branch of another school) and their maps were from MO.
post #22 of 149
So you got the print letters?
post #23 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chekhovgirl View Post
So you got the print letters?
Yeah, lower-case print. Yours are on backorder?
post #24 of 149
Thread Starter 
Getting close! I made a big run to the thrift store and Michaels and such to pick up items to round out the initial Practical Life activities. I'm going to try to have the shelves full of Practical Life those first few days, with one or two initial Sensorial activities (Pink Tower and Cylinder Block #1, probably).

I also finally found some photographs for on the walls. We hit so many thrift and bookstores, but I finally found a book of photos of baby animals at TJ Maxx or some sort. I hung up an adorable baby giraffe on one wall, and a selection of various North American wildlife on another wall (porcupine, brown bear, duck, wolf). Baby animals are probably more cutsey than you'd see in a Montessori school, but at least it's photos from real life -- and DD LOVES them.

And I finished checking out all of the materials. I really love the golden bead material. DH and I couldn't stop holding and turning over the thousand cube.

ETA: I put this up in another thread, but I'll ask here, too. What are your favorite Practical Life activities? I've got the basics (dry pouring, spooning, tonging, dressing) and some more complex ones for later. But I'm always looking for new ideas.
post #25 of 149
I'd love to see pictures of everyone's Montessori areas and activities. Anyone want to share photos? I need ideas for the future.
post #26 of 149
Wish I had taken pictures before dismantling ours. We're relocating and selling the house so I need that room to look like a bedroom or nobody would believe that bedroom furniture actually CAN fit in it (it's long and narrow).

Mine is 6yo and I'm really looking for math materials. The monthome site doesn't really tell you how to make the bead things so I'll be googling for that later.

If anyone else has ideas for Montessori math, let me know. And if the NAMC stuff is worthwhile for learning how to teach it, also let me know!!!
post #27 of 149
Thread Starter 
I'll post pictures as soon as mine is assembled. Right now it's just empty shelves and pictures on the wall -- I don't want to start setting things up until I'm really ready to go. It'll definitely be done by Tuesday!

There's a few really good posts online about making the bead material. There's info here, and a link to a really detailed site: http://sporschool.blogspot.com/2009/...-material.html
post #28 of 149

How do I start?

I am also interested in homeschooling my dd who is 23 months old, however, I'm completely clueless on how to start. I read one of Maria Montessori's book and started applying a lot of the principles she discussed in her book in our daily lives, but I need a more consistent framework. Do you guys think that I should just purchase one of the albums or would you recommend a particular book? When I read your posts, I can tell that all of you are way more familiar with this stuff than I am so I was wondering if you could give me some direction on how to start this journey without becoming totally overwhelmed.
post #29 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flavfeliz View Post
I am also interested in homeschooling my dd who is 23 months old, however, I'm completely clueless on how to start. I read one of Maria Montessori's book and started applying a lot of the principles she discussed in her book in our daily lives, but I need a more consistent framework. Do you guys think that I should just purchase one of the albums or would you recommend a particular book? When I read your posts, I can tell that all of you are way more familiar with this stuff than I am so I was wondering if you could give me some direction on how to start this journey without becoming totally overwhelmed.
For day-to-day implementation, I'd start with "Teach Me to do it Myself". It's filled with Montessori activities that you can do with stuff around the house. If you decide to get serious and go full-on homeschooling with materials, I think David Gettman's "Basic Montessori: Learning Activities for Under-Fives" is the best book. It's written with a homeschool audience in mind and has clearly laid out the order of materials, how to present each one, and the goals. There are also albums available online if you find yourself looking for direction on specific activities.

ETA: I need to note that those books are going to be focused on age 3-6 activities. I'm pretty sure there's another book or two that have activities for younger (maybe "Montessori from the Start"?), but I don't own them, unfortunately.

AFM: DD invented her own Practical Life yesterday. I had a big sheet of cardboard (packaging from the Ikea kids' desk for her school area) out that we'd been drawing on. DD got hold of a pen with cap and started punching holes in the cardboard, then sticking crayons vertically into the holes. She worked at that quite a while, and it was great exercise for her upper-body strength (she's slightly behind in gross motor skills and strength). I think she's going to love pin-punching when I put that out a bit later.
post #30 of 149
Thanks so much for ge advice, Jen. I am going to get the books you suggested and go from there!
post #31 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenfl View Post
Getting close! I made a big run to the thrift store and Michaels and such to pick up items to round out the initial Practical Life activities. I'm going to try to have the shelves full of Practical Life those first few days, with one or two initial Sensorial activities (Pink Tower and Cylinder Block #1, probably).

I also finally found some photographs for on the walls. We hit so many thrift and bookstores, but I finally found a book of photos of baby animals at TJ Maxx or some sort. I hung up an adorable baby giraffe on one wall, and a selection of various North American wildlife on another wall (porcupine, brown bear, duck, wolf). Baby animals are probably more cutsey than you'd see in a Montessori school, but at least it's photos from real life -- and DD LOVES them.

And I finished checking out all of the materials. I really love the golden bead material. DH and I couldn't stop holding and turning over the thousand cube.

ETA: I put this up in another thread, but I'll ask here, too. What are your favorite Practical Life activities? I've got the basics (dry pouring, spooning, tonging, dressing) and some more complex ones for later. But I'm always looking for new ideas.
Polishing! Our kids at school always loved brass polishing or shoe polishing. One classroom had the most adorable brass mouse with these huge ears that the kids loved to polish. The great thing is that these things doubled as beautiful decorations for the classroom. The polishing was set up on a tray and then they could choose what to polish, which was them caring for their classroom, there wasn't a "set" item with the polishing. They used the cutest little flannel polishing cloths.
post #32 of 149

How much should I offer for used materials?

As luck would have it, I just came across a school in my neighborhood that is closing and selling lots of Montessori materials. Here is a list of what is available:

Sensorial - sound cylinders, knobbed cylinders, knobless cylinders, geo cab and cards, broad stair (needs to be sanded and stained), pink tower, go solids, fabrics, smelling cylinders.

Practical life - dressing frames and stand, various parts of games such as arranging flowers, washing clothes, etc.

Math - ten and teen boards, division board, fraction game, some beads, bank game cards, addition and sub strip board.

Cultural - flags and stand, sand paper globe.

The owner told me to think about it and make an offer. The materials are in used but good condition, but I have no idea about what would make a fair offer. I would really appreciate if any of you had any suggestions on how much I should offer and whether I should go for the whole lot. Thanks so much in advance!
post #33 of 149
Thread Starter 
flavfeliz -- What amazingly good luck! I so wish I'd been able to find something like that!

I'd probably start by researching Montessori Outlet and Adena's and other online suppliers to get an idea of how much it would cost to buy that stuff new. Then I'd figure out what was a number we could afford. Then I'd try to reconcile the two. Of course, you can't really put a price on the Practical Life stuff, but I've found that REALLY valuable to have around the house. A random assortment of trays, vases, spoons, etc comes in really handy for setting up activities. I paid about $100 for about 6 office supply boxes (the sort you get a bunch of paper in) full of stuff.

I'm torn between taking it all and selling what you can't use on eBay (resale of Montessori on there tends to go pretty well) versus picking and choosing what you think you'll use/don't want to make. That would probably depend, for me, on how close the cost of the materials would come to what I could afford and how much time I have to invest in the resale (listing, shipping, etc).
post #34 of 149
Thread Starter 
I took advantage of DH coming home late (he works night-shift weekends) to do our first day a day early.

It went.... meh. I'll ponder how it went the rest of today and put a more thoughtful blog post up. But first impressions -- DD was a lot more scattered than I expected, she treated the materials more roughly than I expected, and it's very hard to balance being friendly and inviting and encouraging with stepping back and not intefering and not correcting. I don't think I did well -- I was too distant, yet I also corrected.

I'm a bit disappointed and discouraged. But we'll see what happens. I put so much effort into preparing for this -- it couldn't realistically have gone well enough.
post #35 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenfl View Post
I took advantage of DH coming home late (he works night-shift weekends) to do our first day a day early.

It went.... meh. I'll ponder how it went the rest of today and put a more thoughtful blog post up. But first impressions -- DD was a lot more scattered than I expected, she treated the materials more roughly than I expected, and it's very hard to balance being friendly and inviting and encouraging with stepping back and not intefering and not correcting. I don't think I did well -- I was too distant, yet I also corrected.

I'm a bit disappointed and discouraged. But we'll see what happens. I put so much effort into preparing for this -- it couldn't realistically have gone well enough.
(Still stalking this thread)

It's a transition. In time she will "normalize" just like children in an actual Montessori school have to. Hang in there.

Out of curiosity, what was your approach? Can you paint a picture of how it went? How you prepared her for it? Maybe we can help with ideas of how you could improve the experience.

Try not to be too discouraged.
post #36 of 149
Thread Starter 
I've got DD chowing down on some pancakes, so let's see how far I can get before I need to attend to toddler business.

I'd planned to start tomorrow, but I had nearly all the activities ready today. We had the house to ourselves, no plans for the first few hours, so I decided to just jump in so that I didn't have another evening of planning and over-analyzing. Maybe I should have kept that time -- run through how to present the room and activities to her, etc.

While she was in another room, I pulled out the materials. Our first-day set-up was Cylinder Block #1, Pink Tower, spooning (pink rice), tonging (porcupine balls), small containers to open/close, and buttoning felt squares onto ribbon.

I had earlier (while we were eating muffins on the couch) explained to DD that we were going to start Montessori activities soon (she's aware of Montessori and has done Practical Life things before). I told her that there would be new activities and she should ask for me to show her one first -- that I'd take a turn, then she'd take a turn (taking turns is a recently-developed skill, thanks to the toddler version of Candyland), then she could do that activity whenever she wanted. I also reminded her about returning them to their place (which she's also had experience with).

So we went into the room and she ping-ponged around, checking everything out. I got out a rug for her to work on (also something she's had experience with, but doesn't like to/isn't good at rolling and unrolling herself). The first thing she chose was the spooning. I demonstrated moving 2-3 spoonfuls from one bowl to another, with her asking to do it the whole time. I turned the activity over to her, she dumped the destination bowl back into the source bowl, then moved 2-3 spoonfuls herself and dumped again. Then she returned it to the shelf.

Note #1: I'm not sure how much of a deal I want to make the rug. Right now, she's the only one working. The rug takes up a good chunk of the floor space we have. It seems kinda silly, especially since the rolling/unrolling caused some conflict. But I do like the idea of having a contained area to work in. I'm unsure.

Note #2: Demonstrating a whole activity vs part of an activity. In one of the Margaret Homfray videos, she mentioned that she allowed children to take over in the middle of a presentation (she was speaking about the Cylinder Blocks) because they likely grasped the activity and didn't need to sit through the whole thing. But I know that other Montessori trainers say to demonstrate the entire cycle. It seems silly to spoon all of the rice while DD is hanging over me, asking for a turn -- it's obvious what to do! But the fact that she only spooned as many spoonfuls as I demonstrated hints that maybe I need to finish the entire cycle -- that she can't extrapolate through to the end.

Okay. More to come, but I need to get DD ready for storytime.
post #37 of 149
We're also Montessori homeschoolers. Before I had children, I was a Montessori teacher in a primary-level classroom. Now, I am doing mainly elementary activities with my older boy. At the moment, I am preparing for a new baby in just a few weeks' time, so school is much lower on our list than usual, and the environment -- oh, geez -- it's pretty bad! I am optimistic about things picking up in the months following Baby's arrival.

I am a really big fan of Paula Polk Lillard for parent/home teacher education, but I must say that, for me, The Absorbent Mind is a wonderful homeschool/unschool primer.

I also made a big recent order with Montessori Concepts -- I thought their prices were really good. But, they totally messed everything up (except charging my credit card, of course ) and here we are, several weeks later with no new materials. Also, they haven't returned my calls or emails. I am super mad about it!

I am eager to try some of the sites that y'all listed previously! Thanks for those.
post #38 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenfl View Post
I wouldn't do it. You can straight up buy the albums from NAMC for about $1000, but if you're getting them from your mom (and there are a few different sources online, and there's the Gettman book), they aren't really necessary. They look pretty, but I don't think they're necessarily any better.
So you feel that with the Gettman book, and some albums (even some that could be found online) you would have enough?

DS is currently in a Montessori preschool, but next year, we have to move, so DD will only be able to go one year, and since DS loves it so much, we are thinking a bout homeschooling. I am trying to start myself up, and although I am familiar with the method, I feel overwhelmed...

Is there any place with a program? You know a timeline of some sort? I feel like I need all the material right from the start, but cannot have it all at once, and I don't know where to start. I have a 4 yo and a 2 yo. They will be 6 and 3 when I start...
post #39 of 149
Thread Starter 
Hi, velveeta! How great to see that a Montessori teacher chose homeschooling! Makes me feel like maybe we're not crazy to think we can make this work. Did you do 3-6 with your older one at home?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neptune2 View Post
So you feel that with the Gettman book, and some albums (even some that could be found online) you would have enough?....Is there any place with a program? You know a timeline of some sort? I feel like I need all the material right from the start, but cannot have it all at once, and I don't know where to start. I have a 4 yo and a 2 yo. They will be 6 and 3 when I start...
Hi, Neptune2! Do you think you'll still be doing Primary stuff with your 6 year old, or moving into Elementary?

Because Montessori is so child-driven, there really isn't a timeline laid out. But Gettman breaks things into "periods", so you can tell what your kid is likely to be working on at the same time. I know other people have used that to decide what to buy -- they can see what their kid is likely to use first, buy that, and buy piecemeal as they grow.

I've looked a little into New Child Montessori (http://www.newchildmontessori.com) which may be more what you're looking for. But that's mostly going to be useful for your younger child, not the older one. There's not quite so many resources out there for Elementary, and the material seems to be more expensive.

I'd buy Gettman now and at least read through the parts before he gets into activity details. That might help you know if you want to look deeper into theory (reading Maria Montessori's books) or into implementation (looking at albums online or into buying some).

Oh! And there's Karen Tyler's course (http://www.amontessorimarketplace.com)! I haven't taken it, but it seems to be very well-received on an email list I'm on. You get online classes and an album out of the deal. No certification, but if you're not looking to work in a classroom, that's not a big deal. And, again, it's for 3-6.

AFM -- DD seems to be having a rough day overall. So I'm going to blame a generally grumpy day for the poor first day we had, and not fault myself entirely. I'll post later with a bit more about how our first day went so maybe you can give me some insights. I think I'm really struggling with balancing being a mom (encouraging, goofy) with being a guide (stepping back, demonstrating taking the materials and environment seriously).
post #40 of 149
Thread Starter 
Here's what I'm going to hold on to tonight:

"You might look at a Montessori classroom towards the end of the year and see the teacher moving calmly as the children go about their work with focus and diligence, but in reality the first few weeks of school are utter and complete chaos." (http://montessorimatters.wordpress.c...school-jitters)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Montessori
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at School › Montessori › Ongoing Montessori homeschooling thread?