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Medela further violating WHO code - Page 11

post #201 of 215
One more point: I think PhD in Parenting sums up my frustrated feelings here:

Quote:
I don’t want to be overly critical of Medela. I think the company does a great job promoting and facilitating breastfeeding. Most of the information on its website is wonderful. Most of its products are of the highest quality. I have been nothing but happy with my Medela products.

To be clear, on a sliding scale this is not even close to Enfamil or Nestle or other formula companies. Not even close. But I would argue that any violation of the WHO Code weakens its potential impact. We cannot say “it’s okay because you are Medela,” but then slap Nestle on the hand for everything it does wrong.
post #202 of 215
Also worth considering - this post by Makes Mom Happy. She reiterates much of what has been argued here in critique of Medela's recent turnaround, and also explains why Medela pumps, despite their good points, have a distinct and quite important disadvantage:


Quote:
If more mothers knew the facts about their pumps, Medela would be selling a lot less of them. I have a PIS sitting in my closet, waiting to die a slow death in a landfill.

Why? Because it can't be given to anyone else. That's right, my $280 breastpump has to be tossed. It's not FDA approved for more than one user.

There are "closed system" and "open system" pumps. Medela is the latter. Having an "open system" means that milk can contaminate the tubing and the motor. While the tubing can be cleaned or replaced, the motor cannot.
Both Hygeia and Ameda make pumps that are on par with the effectiveness of the famous and popular Pump in Style, yet are not only WHO compliant but also closed system, which is better for moms even if they don't pass it to another mom, but especially if they do.
post #203 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix23 View Post
I personally don't give a flip if Medela violates the WHO code because the code is outdated and needs to be more inclusive of women who have to use bottles. Acting like bottles for pumping mothers need to be hidden and not advertised (and there is no way I would buy a bottle with no picture on the box, I want to see what I am getting) damages breastfeeding because it makes women feel like pumping is something to be ashamed of. Lets face it, the majority of the women in the USA are going to go back to work in their baby's first year. If we want women to not use formula, then companies that make pumps and the corresponding parts (and that includes bottles) need to be advertising a lot more then the formula companies. I hope they advertise more so that more women will be aware that their are other options then just going to formula when returning to work.
and that's why I didn't buy the Hygia bottles. I bought the Avent bottles because I can tell by looking at the box that my babies will take that nipple.
post #204 of 215
But it's so clearly not about whether a picture of a bottle is on the box or not. It's about ADVERTISING them. Of course you can have pictures on the box (as long as it doesn't have pictures of baby being fed, cute cartoons or whatnot - that is totally different). You can't put them on the box of ANOTHER PRODUCT, it because that's advertising them, but on the box that the product self comes in, of course. I had to buy bottles for my baby and needed to see what was in the myself.

This is a non-argument, totally irrelevant to Medela's decision toactively market the products and engage in promotions.
post #205 of 215
Disturbed to see this blog post on the Breastfeeding 101 Class Medela is hosting at BRU: http://dou-la-la.blogspot.com/2010/0...delas-who.html

"A basics of breastfeeding class whose description begins with "Ready, set, pump!" If that doesn't make their priorities clear, I don't know what will. Believe me, I know firsthand that a pump is sometimes absolutely essential. And certainly it is for mothers who work outside the home. Hallelujah for them, seriously. But a breastfeeding class that focuses first and foremost on pumping?"

Pumps can be a lifesaver, but this crosses a line IMO. Not to mention how frightening it is that Babies R Us is teaching moms about breastfeeding. "Hey if breastfeeding doesn't work out, we've got formula one aisle over..." Gag.
post #206 of 215
At the BRU by me they have the formula on the same aisle that is specifically called "nursing items" or something similar. I gave the manager an earful about that and haven't returned so I don't know if they made any changes.
post #207 of 215
I work for WIC and the contract for our region is with Medela for pumps. In their hand pumps, they had coupons for their bottles and we had to remove them before issuing the pump to a client because of the WHO violation.
post #208 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlygirls View Post
I work for WIC and the contract for our region is with Medela for pumps. In their hand pumps, they had coupons for their bottles and we had to remove them before issuing the pump to a client because of the WHO violation.
See that make no sence to me

why would a coupon IN the box for bottles for the PUMP be a bad thing? I would be glad for those coupons since bottles do eventually need to be replaced.

I would rather spend the money on Medela bottles, that have BF encouragment right on the bottle, and fit the pump then some other brand, Those bottles are not cheap so most end up having to use cheap ones.

Thats not advertisment that I would see as offensive, since its replacement bottles AND its IN the box WITH the pump.
post #209 of 215
As a mom who went back to work after a 12 week maternity leave, I am very grateful for my medela PIS and my medela bottles that were BPA free to store my breastmilk in. Not everyone CAN or WANTS to exclusively breastfeed from the breast. Exclusivley feeding ones child breastmilk whatever the feeding source may be should be a goal for all women. I would much rather have medela be marketing to pregnant moms and new moms then all the formula crap that you get in the hospital.
post #210 of 215
It makes sense that bottles and pumps would go together. Especially for working moms, who are leaving breastmilk with a childcare provider. I think it's great that Medela promotes pumping and giving babies human milk rather than artificial milk when nursing isn't an option.
post #211 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix23 View Post
But babies don't use the bottles attatched to the pump, they need nipples, and not allowing that to be shown is implying that bottle feeding is a bad thing. It's like saying you can breastfeed, but cover up so we don't have to see it. The WHO is saying, you can sell bottles, but try and keep it as covered up as possible. Don't advertise it, only show pictures of them attatched to a pump, not put together with a nipple or actually being used to feed a baby. Like the bottle with a nipple is something to be ashamed of, something not to be shown.

I know no one here wrote the WHO! And I actually think I already had this exact same argument here a couple months ago and it never really went anywhere, so I'm going to drop out because my goal this year was to spend less time online.
This.

And although this is clearly not the intent of the WHO code, this is clearly how many pumping mothers feel when reading the defense of this particular aspect of the code. I remember a similar thread a year or so ago (?) in reference to a Medela video (I think - it's been quite a looong time, lol), and all I got was an unmoving "We support the WHO code." Well, okay, I get that. But supporting the code that doesn't mean that one can't look at something (even the code) through a different lens.

Quote:
Originally Posted by felix23 View Post
It may have not been intended to attack people who bottlefeed, but the end result of how they have written it is that it does attack pumping and bottlefeeding mothers.
I don't think the *code* does the attacking, but I think that bottle feeding mothers feel that way at times through the way they read the code and through the reactions of others *to* the code.

Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post
I have to say, I hadnt realized the implications of the whole Maven thing until now. Now every time I read a post of someone praising Medela, I have to wonder-- are they a Maven? are they being compensated in some way for this post? are they linking to this thread on another board to show how they talked up Medela? And it feels really, really creepy. I don't know that it's a WHO Code violation, but it's leaving me feel extremely mistrustful right now.
But they can't ID themselves, correct? So that's kind of unfair to those of us who love Medela and post as such.

Quote:
Originally Posted by April Dawn View Post
Actually, they are awesome about replacing broken pump parts or SNS parts free, so I think that's kind of passing savings on to the consumer. A month ago I called them because my Symphony tubing broke and I only had one working side and I couldn't find a store that sold just the tubing without the rest of the pump kit. Not only did they send it to me free, they overnight shipped it! Granted, that's not "passing savings on" in the sense that, say, lowering pump prices would be. But still, they did not have to do that for free!

Given the concerns people have expressed about stealth marketing, I now feel I need to add that I am *not* being given any goodies by Medela for saying that, and I have no association with them. I promise. I am just a random pumping mom who has been impressed with them.
Yeah, well...

I have been pumping for SEVEN years. I had an original PIS with the clear diaphragm cover, and now I have the second generation original PIS with the yellow diaphragm cover. So I guess I have a PIS(-A). Recently, all of my power supplies for it broke. At once. The battery pack, the car charger, and the AC adapter. Sadly, the new PISA is a 9v and not a 12v, so the new accessories won't work. I called BRU (useless) about replacement parts and was told that they were no longer being made and that I would need to upgrade my perfectly fine pump. Huh. I called Medela and was told that although the parts are on the website, they are hard to find, so I might be better off buying a new, better pump (double huh).

I found the replacement adapters on Ebay and had one overnighted. Color me very unimpressed.
post #212 of 215
Honest question: How is Medela supposed to make any money and stay in business if they don't market their product? How are they supposed to compete with formula feeding in a continent where breastfeeding is simply is not the norm?

Until WHO code is enforced and made law, there's no way I'm going to speak negatively of Medela in any way. Unless this happens, they really don't have a chance. The playing field is far from level.
post #213 of 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by pumpkinhead View Post
Honest question: How is Medela supposed to make any money and stay in business if they don't market their product? How are they supposed to compete with formula feeding in a continent where breastfeeding is simply is not the norm?

Until WHO code is enforced and made law, there's no way I'm going to speak negatively of Medela in any way. Unless this happens, they really don't have a chance. The playing field is far from level.
Pumps are not covered under the WHO code. Medela could run pump commercials every hour of the day and remain code-compliant. Medela can also sell bottles and remain code-compliant.

The issue is with their marketing of bottles/nipples, which they have elected to promote and advertise completely separately from their pumps. I've recently been seeing Medela google smart ads for bottles - one wouldn't even know that they are a breastpump company from these ads.

Do we really need more bottle marketing? Is there anyone out there who isn't aware of the fact that baby bottles exist? Images of pretty moms bottlefeeding their babies don't help to normalize breastfeeding in our society. I don't think it's asking a lot for a supposedly pro-breastfeeding company with a near monopoly on the market to respect basic ethical standards in their advertising.
post #214 of 215
I'd imagine there isn't a huge lot of money in breastpump sales alone. If marketing bottles and nipples is what they have to do to stay afloat in this economy, I fully support them. There's not much use in pumping breast milk if you don't have a delivery method for said milk.
post #215 of 215
And with formula companies now producing and marketing breast pumps, they hardly have a monopoly. Lets not forget Ameda, Avent, Gerber and the like.
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