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Shea butter instead of sun screen? Need advice ASAP! - Page 2

post #21 of 45
While I don't consider Mercola to be a credible source, I do agree with some of what he says. Some sun is fine, use clothing to cover up as much as possible, never, ever allow your skin to burn. There, we agree.

However, no where does his article say that tanned skin is healthy. It's not. Tanned skin means that UVA rays have penetrated deeply into the skin. This is not healthy. But, as you claim it is, I'd love to see research supporting this. Not researching saying that some sun exposure is good for the skin - this I know and, even having had melanoma, I still do get minimal sun exposure for vitamin D. That's not what I'm talking about. I'm talking about your claim that tanning is good for the skin. I'd like to see research to back up this claim.
post #22 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom61508 View Post
yes that's why I said it leaves us tan I also recommended California baby for sunscreen and using shade to protect your skin.
Yes I was clarifying because the OP asked for sunscreen.
post #23 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by JL83 View Post
Actually, there was a ton of cancer throughout history. They find evidence of cancer, in the form of tumors and other physical evidence, in mummies and other historical remains.

Also, our "ancestors" lived in the same places for thousands and thousands of years. There weren't people of Northern European decent living in Florida...
Precisely.

We also have damaged the ozone layer since then.
post #24 of 45
One possible reason for the rise in melanoma is the increasing number of people who don't get daily smaller doses of sunshine, increasing gradually throughout the spring and decreasing gradually throughout the fall.

A beach vacation is a near-stereotypical instance of that. You leave a cooler, less sunny place where you have been covered up, and you take your pale, pasty skin and uncover it all at once to more and stronger sunlight than you've been exposed to recently. It is a recipe for skin damage. If you're going to bare your skin to the sun under those circumstances, you almost certainly want a real sunscreen. If you dont' want to use "chemical sunscreens," then you need to physically cover your skin, avoid direct sun in the peak hours, wear a hat, etc. A vacation is unlikely to provide enough time for you to build up any safe level of "protective tan,' (and I use the term loosely, because it protects from one kind of skin cancer, but may increase the chances of a different, albeit less deadly, kind).

One theory I've read is that that kind of sun exposure (sudden exposure of skin unprotected by a tan) increases the incidence of melanoma, while regular exposure is more likely to cause squamous cell tumors. Melanoma kills you fast and young, while squamous tumors grow slowly enough that prior to life-extending modern medicine, most people died of other causes before that kind of cancer took them out.

I'd also note, in passing, that just because something is a natural oil extracted from a seed or nut doesn't mean it is not a "chemical." It may not be petroieum-based, but all compounds, regardless of source, are chemicals by definition, and natural ones can be just as dangerous as the ones made in laboratories -- or more dangerous. Try rubbing pennyroyal oil on your skin. Or rue. It'll cause plenty of skin damage -- and there are plenty of natural chemicals that can mess up your liver or DNA as well.
post #25 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquishyKitty View Post
There absolutely was skin cancer, it just wasn't diagnosable "Back then". Skin cancer isn't something that was just invented to make people buy more sunscreen.

OP, I would think that shea butter would actually help you to tan/burn. I would look into some of the natural sunscreens suggested here. It may not be ideal, but it's a good compromise to make I think.
I know skin cancer wasn't invented to make people buy more sunscreen. Skin cancer as well as all cancers are a real threat for all of us but I don't believe the sun alone is the culprit. There's just to many studies that show sun exposure in moderation outweigh the risks then no sun exposure. You can't deny that. Amacal I don't know which article you read..he has many. How is Mercola not credible?? JL83- I'm not talking cancer in general but If there was skin cancer It wasn't abundant like it is now..that's for sure!

Do we need a SAFE sunscreen at times...yes we do. For circumstances like the beach or long periods in the sun. I know it's VERY BAD to let yourself burn but a tan isn't bad. I would never let DD be in the sun unprotected for a long time but I will let her get out in the sun mid-day as often as possible for at least 20 minutes. I don't see how that is unhealthy!
post #26 of 45
Our family doesn't use sunscreen.
post #27 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by savithny View Post
One possible reason for the rise in melanoma is the increasing number of people who don't get daily smaller doses of sunshine, increasing gradually throughout the spring and decreasing gradually throughout the fall.

A beach vacation is a near-stereotypical instance of that. You leave a cooler, less sunny place where you have been covered up, and you take your pale, pasty skin and uncover it all at once to more and stronger sunlight than you've been exposed to recently. It is a recipe for skin damage. If you're going to bare your skin to the sun under those circumstances, you almost certainly want a real sunscreen. If you dont' want to use "chemical sunscreens," then you need to physically cover your skin, avoid direct sun in the peak hours, wear a hat, etc. A vacation is unlikely to provide enough time for you to build up any safe level of "protective tan,' (and I use the term loosely, because it protects from one kind of skin cancer, but may increase the chances of a different, albeit less deadly, kind).

One theory I've read is that that kind of sun exposure (sudden exposure of skin unprotected by a tan) increases the incidence of melanoma, while regular exposure is more likely to cause squamous cell tumors. Melanoma kills you fast and young, while squamous tumors grow slowly enough that prior to life-extending modern medicine, most people died of other causes before that kind of cancer took them out.

I'd also note, in passing, that just because something is a natural oil extracted from a seed or nut doesn't mean it is not a "chemical." It may not be petroieum-based, but all compounds, regardless of source, are chemicals by definition, and natural ones can be just as dangerous as the ones made in laboratories -- or more dangerous. Try rubbing pennyroyal oil on your skin. Or rue. It'll cause plenty of skin damage -- and there are plenty of natural chemicals that can mess up your liver or DNA as well.
There are absolutely natural ingredients that can cause sun damage that's not what I'm debating about. I think we would all rather use a more natural sunscreen then one filled with unthinkable ingredients. Mainstream medicine has us so scared of the sun that we all cover up with harmful chemicals to block the suns rays and the wonderful hormone D it provides us, contributing to tons of disease. I totally agree that you have to build up sun time so you don't burn but gradually build a tan
post #28 of 45
I just had to share about my experience with shea butter....
I have VERY fare skin that burns easily.
I lived in Africa and only used shea butter as a sunblock- NEVER got burned.
Last summer we went to the beach and I had a combination of sunscreens available- some natural, some not and with high spf's. They barely did the job. I had no shea butter on me at the time.
I to believe some sun exposure in necessary and beneficial.
Once again, I have NO scientific evidence or figures.
LOVE SHEA BUTTER!
post #29 of 45
Again mom61508 - you keep saying we need to build a tan - that tan skin is ok. And again, I am asking for any evidence at all that tanning your skin is in anyway beneficial and at a minimum, not harmful.

I'm not talking about a bit of sun exposure. I agree with some sun exposure. But, tanning your skin is not safe. It's just not. If your skin is tan, it is damaged. period. If you are allowing your children to tan, their skin is being damaged. period.

Some sun exposure is fine. But, sun exposure to the point of a tan is not fine. It is sun damage. That is the definition of a tan.
http://www.usnews.com/health/family-...-safe-tan.html
post #30 of 45
Find a Target there. They sell California Baby. I wouldn't count on Shea butter for a vacation. It would be different if it was somewhere you lived all year long and your skin was accustomed to the sun exposure there, but I woudn't take the chance. Heck, I'd use chemical laden sunscreen over nothing at all if it came down to it.
post #31 of 45
amcal, how can one expose their skin to the sun *without* tanning it? I live in Canada, and I work outside in summer with a Tshirt on and always get a 'farmers' tan. My arms are still brown from last summer. I don't 'tan' in the sense that I lay for hours in the sun, but my skin does tan. I'm not understanding how some sun exposure can be fine, but ANY tan isn't. The two seem to contradict each other.
post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by BedHead View Post
amcal, how can one expose their skin to the sun *without* tanning it? I live in Canada, and I work outside in summer with a Tshirt on and always get a 'farmers' tan. My arms are still brown from last summer. I don't 'tan' in the sense that I lay for hours in the sun, but my skin does tan. I'm not understanding how some sun exposure can be fine, but ANY tan isn't. The two seem to contradict each other.
post #33 of 45
It's very easy to expose skin to sun without ever tanning or burning. I don't see the contradiction at all. I guess I don't even understand the question. You expose your skin enough to not tan or burn. That's it.

You're working outside in the sun - I'm guessing longer than 10 minutes or so at a time? Well then, you'll tan/burn.

You really only need about 10 minutes or so and it doesn't have to be all at once. Where I live, I get enough sun just by passive activity - getting in and out of the car, walking from the parking lot into the store etc....
post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by amcal View Post
It's very easy to expose skin to sun without ever tanning or burning. I don't see the contradiction at all. I guess I don't even understand the question. You expose your skin enough to not tan or burn. That's it.

You're working outside in the sun - I'm guessing longer than 10 minutes or so at a time? Well then, you'll tan/burn.

You really only need about 10 minutes or so and it doesn't have to be all at once. Where I live, I get enough sun just by passive activity - getting in and out of the car, walking from the parking lot into the store etc....
Have you had your vitamin D tested? I know my mom was low before the summer began last summer, so she cut back on sunscreen and was *lower* at the end of the summer... Just curious if you've had a different experience...
post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by abimommy View Post

We also have damaged the ozone layer since then.
Yup.
post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom61508 View Post
I'm sorry but it seem common sense to me that applying CHEMICALS in any form straight into your or your LO's skin is not healthy. any chemicals applied directly to the skin is absorbed within 60 seconds. How can chemicals not be contributing to skin cancer and others cancers??? Common chemicals for sunscreens are also known as hormone disruptors,I do agree with T dioxide or zinc oxide(if it's not in the form of nano particles they are said to be harmful) is best If you need the protection(at the beach you need some form of sun protection for sure). A sunburn is damaging to your skin working up your sun exposure daily and developing a tan is healthy!

Here is a great article on sunscreens and why some are not safe.
http://www.healthychild.com/first-ai...nscreens-safe/
1. Actually, a tan is a sign of damage to the skin. It's not "healthy".

2. The website you reference SELLS the sunscreen they recommend. I don't consider sites that exist to sell products to be unbiased sources of information.

That said, it only takes 10 or 15 minutes of exposure per day to stimulate Vit. D production, and most people who hang out outside for 10 or 15 minutes at 9 AM or 3 PM will not get tan as a result.
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juvysen View Post
Have you had your vitamin D tested? I know my mom was low before the summer began last summer, so she cut back on sunscreen and was *lower* at the end of the summer... Just curious if you've had a different experience...
I had my levels tested right after my cancer diagnosis and my Vit D level was 48. I believe 50 - 75 is ideal (I could be wrong about those numbers). My primary care Dr, Oncologist and Derm all felt my vit D numbers were fine but, I'd like them a little higher so I supplement with 2,000 iu Vit D3 daily.
post #38 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by amcal View Post
I had my levels tested right after my cancer diagnosis and my Vit D level was 48. I believe 50 - 75 is ideal (I could be wrong about those numbers). My primary care Dr, Oncologist and Derm all felt my vit D numbers were fine but, I'd like them a little higher so I supplement with 2,000 iu Vit D3 daily.
Interesting - wonder if your being in arizona makes the difference. She stopped using sunscreen all summer and was out mostly after 3 or before 10 and her levels went down, not up... but then, she's in upstate NY... so we get different levels of sun, maybe? She had been supplementing before the summer but quit thinking the sun would do a better job... apparently not.
post #39 of 45
Actually, I just came across an interesting article:
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/589256_7

This may make me rethink supplementing. It seems like 48 is actually quite ideal - a little bit above where I need to be....

Jenna - I do think being in AZ has something to do with it. I get a lot of passive sun - unwanted passive sun. I keep pretty covered up but, it doesn't take much skin exposure or much time in the sun to get significant exposure.

I cover my arms, head and legs but wear sandals so that little area on the tops of my feet get lots of passive sun exposure just walking in and out of places.
post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by amcal View Post
It's very easy to expose skin to sun without ever tanning or burning. I don't see the contradiction at all. I guess I don't even understand the question. You expose your skin enough to not tan or burn. That's it.

You're working outside in the sun - I'm guessing longer than 10 minutes or so at a time? Well then, you'll tan/burn.

You really only need about 10 minutes or so and it doesn't have to be all at once. Where I live, I get enough sun just by passive activity - getting in and out of the car, walking from the parking lot into the store etc....
10 minutes isn't really enough actually. Getting adequate Vitamin D depends on many things. If your dark skinned you need a lot more time in the sun,time of year,time of day your in the sun, amount of clothing, and diet.
http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/cancerMain.shtml
http://www.toyourhealth.com/mpacms/t...5&pagenumber=1
I too live in AZ and my Vit D was a 36 they recommend at least a 50. It also depends on what lab you use. labcorp is more accurate the quest. PP was saying in order to get ADEQUATE vitamin D exposure most people will get a tan. By you saying a tan is bad your saying vitamin D is bad. That's what I'm understanding.

3 is magic-Everyone has to make a living. Just because they sell a sunblock doesn't mean the info isn't reputable.

This is another interesting thread on tans. Some believe a tan is healthy and some don't. There's so much out there that says sun exposure outweighs the risks
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...hlight=tanning
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