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February 2010 Book Challenege - Page 2

post #21 of 132
#27 A Cold Treachery by Charles Todd

Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
I Feel Bad About My Neck by Nora Ephron

After reading Heartburn a while ago and loving it, I thought I'd try this book of essays by Ephron. It was okay . . . some were very funny, some so-so. I definitely love her outlook on things.
Should I be worried that this means we have lost our book-liking affinity, Cathe? I remember picking this one up and feeling really turned off by it....
post #22 of 132
I don't think so. I wasn't thrilled by it.
post #23 of 132
#7 Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by JK Rowling

I must admit that this was a much better book than I expected.
post #24 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by workjw View Post
#7 Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by JK Rowling

I must admit that this was a much better book than I expected.
I'm going to start re-reading the Harry Potter series as soon as I finish the Lord of the Rings trilogy. I love HP! :]

#1-The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien-3/5
I had trouble "getting into" this book, but I think that was probably because it's been about 8 months since I've read a novel and my attention span is significantly shorter. Tolkien's way of writing is different than most I've read and takes some getting used to. I love the ballads! The story was a good one. Thorin & Company had some interesting adventures and met some interesting characters. I thought the ending was anti-climactic. I'm hoping for more out of the trilogy.
post #25 of 132
#4)Roma by Steven Saylor
Wow! What an epic. It follows two families from the ancient days before the founding of Rome to the centuries later. It's an amazing work that weaves politics, romance, sex, intrigue, war, and drama. It's not a dry dusty boring work that's a chore to read. Wonderful details and each period comes alive. I really got into this story so much so that I'm going to look for more of his books.

#5) Time of My Life by Allison W. Scotch
An upper middle class stay at home mom is transported back in time to her life before she got married and had a child. She has all her memories of what happened in the future. Will she choose to make the same choices? Will she choose to marry the solid but predictable man she did or will she marry her free spirited boyfriend that she had? The choices she makes are very interesting. It's not a light fluffy read. It really makes you think about what you would do if given the same chance to do over certain periods of your life. There are days in my current life where I wish I could go back in time and do over some of the things I've done, but after reading this book, I've come away with a new appreciation for my life as it is. It's not often that a book makes me think really deeply about my own life and this book did. I was wondering how the author would tie up the ending. It's not every day that someone gets transported back in time and just how do you end a story with such a wild premise. The author did it though. I totally think this book should be made into a movie. It's written in such a way that it could be easily made into a screenplay for a film.
post #26 of 132
#28 Thursday Next: First Among Sequels by Jasper Fforde
This was a re-read for me. It's the only one in the series that we don't own, and when someone here read it recently I decided to get it back out. I do love his humor, though I know it's not for everyone.

#29 Raven Black by Ann Cleeves
mystery/thriller set in the Shetland Islands. It was okay... I believe it is the first in a series of four, I'll probably read the next one.

#30 When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead
set in 1970's NYC, 12 yo Miranda's single mother is practicing to be on the $20,000 Pyramid. Meanwhile, Miranda's friendship with her neighbor seems to be faltering and she doesn't know why and she is receiving notes from a stranger.

#31 The Rock and the River by Kekla Magoon
1968, Chicago. 13 y.o. main character's older brother is a Black Panther and his father is a proponent of nonviolent social change.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
I don't think so. I wasn't thrilled by it.
I told DH that you liked her and he asked if this was the first serious breach in our friendship.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BookGoddess View Post
#4)Roma by Steven Saylor
Wow! What an epic. It follows two families from the ancient days before the founding of Rome to the centuries later. It's an amazing work that weaves politics, romance, sex, intrigue, war, and drama. It's not a dry dusty boring work that's a chore to read. Wonderful details and each period comes alive. I really got into this story so much so that I'm going to look for more of his books.

#5) Time of My Life by Allison W. Scotch
An upper middle class stay at home mom is transported back in time to her life before she got married and had a child. She has all her memories of what happened in the future. Will she choose to make the same choices? Will she choose to marry the solid but predictable man she did or will she marry her free spirited boyfriend that she had? The choices she makes are very interesting. It's not a light fluffy read. It really makes you think about what you would do if given the same chance to do over certain periods of your life. There are days in my current life where I wish I could go back in time and do over some of the things I've done, but after reading this book, I've come away with a new appreciation for my life as it is. It's not often that a book makes me think really deeply about my own life and this book did. I was wondering how the author would tie up the ending. It's not every day that someone gets transported back in time and just how do you end a story with such a wild premise. The author did it though. I totally think this book should be made into a movie. It's written in such a way that it could be easily made into a screenplay for a film.
Cool, I put Roma on hold. and I put Time of My Life on hold even though I can't remember if I read it already or not. : I even went to Amazon to see if I'd rated it, and I haven't.... But it seems awfully familiar.... But I love stuff like that -- the what if kinds of things--so I'll check it out and see. :
post #27 of 132
i liked The View from Garden City so much, i thought i'd spend some more time in Egypt. i have started Palace Walk, the first book in The Cairo Trilogy by Naguib Mahfouz. i have picked up this book several times over the last few years, curious about it. the book starts around WWI and deals in part with themes around colonialism. but mostly it is building up my interest in the mother/wife protagonist of the story.
post #28 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post

I told DH that you liked her and he asked if this was the first serious breach in our friendship.
Buff-- I really liked Heartburn (read it for my foodie book club) and a couple of the women raved about the Feel Bad about my Neck One. I thought that one was so-so. She had a few funny lines and I liked the story about purses but other than that, I wouldn't recommend it. So . . . . are we still friends
post #29 of 132
"The Last Days of Dogtown" by Anita Diamant

Quote:
Inspired by the settlement of Dogtown, MA, Diamant reimagines the community of castoffs—widows, prostitutes, orphans, African-Americans and ne'er-do-wells—all eking out a harsh living in the barren terrain of Cape Ann. Black Ruth, the African woman who dresses like a man and works as a stonemason; Mrs. Stanley, who runs the local brothel, and Judy Rhines, an unmarried white woman whose lover Cornelius is a freed slave, are among Dogtown's inhabitants who are considered suspect—even witches—by outsiders. Shifting perspectives among the various residents (including the settlement's dogs, who provide comfort to the lonely), Diamant brings the period alive with domestic details and movingly evokes the surprising bonds the outcasts form in their dying days. This chronicle of a dwindling community strikes a consistently melancholy tone—readers in search of happy endings won't find any here—but Diamant renders these forgotten lives with imagination and sensitivity.
This book was a bit of a roadblock in my reading progress. It is not the type of book that you can tear through -- either because of ease of writing or edge of your seat action. It is a slow-placed book with lots of characters but little action. None of the characters are ever completely revealed and you are left with lots of unanswered questions.
post #30 of 132
The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria August Trapp

I loved reading this memoir by Maria Trapp. The Sound of Music is one of my favorite all time movies so it was fun seeing where it came from. Trapp was a lot more religious than the Maria in the movie, which I guess figures because she had wanted to be a nun. Her zest for life and determination was so inspiring. I loved reading about some of the Austrian traditions which were similar to my parents German traditions and hearing the history of them.
post #31 of 132
#8 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by JK Rowling

I still can't believe I avoided the HP books all this time! I'm really enjoying them and they are super fast reads.
post #32 of 132
Can I join this thread. I'm an avid reader, I sometimes read more then one book at a time.

1) Post the books you read ... or not
Currently for this month as I'm starting this in February my books I plan on reading is
#1 The last juror -John Grisham (currently reading)
#2 The mother warriors - Jenny McCarthy
#3 Ten things your autistic child wishes they could tell you - (I'll have to get back to you with who this is by
#4 The lost Symbol - Dan Brown


2) Post a recommendation ... or not
I recommend:
A walk to remember - Nicolas Sparks
The notebook - Nicolas Sparks
Dear John - Nicolas Sparks
The color Purple - Can't remember who this is by

4) Make a goal ... or not My goal for 2010 is to read 75 books
post #33 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
Buff-- I really liked Heartburn (read it for my foodie book club) and a couple of the women raved about the Feel Bad about my Neck One. I thought that one was so-so. She had a few funny lines and I liked the story about purses but other than that, I wouldn't recommend it. So . . . . are we still friends
We may need to rebuild some book commonality bridges (you didn't know that was a thing, did you? official architectural term) but we'll probably be able to do that soon.
The only one of hers I've read is the neck one and I only read a tad of that before i became nauseated and put it back in the library bag. this was a long time ago, when we still lived in Indiana, which feels like a lifetime. If I remember correctly, it was her whole sense of self and idea of aging as a tragedy that bothered me. I couldn't identify with it then, and I hope I won't be able to in another 10 years, either.
if that makes any sense.
post #34 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by kangamitroo View Post
panamama, was Because I am furniture agonizing to read? or was it empowering for the protagonist? i had noticed the book but thought, no, i can't go there.
not quite agonizing, but parts of it will defninitely make you squirm/cringe. it does wind up empowering for her, though. really, for me (and DS - we read it together), the hardest part to adjust to was that the whole book is in verse. that was different. still, i'd recommend it. it's a relatively quick read and a good story. i think i got it off of an old book challenge thread from 2009, actually!
post #35 of 132
#32 When Anger Hurts Your Kids: A Parent's Guide by Matthew McKay, PhD., et. al.

I liked a fair bit about what this had to say about adult anger, ways it affects children, ways to control it and to change your trigger thoughts. I wasn't so keen on the way it talks about "consequences". "Well, Jimmy, you didn't pick up your room like I asked you to,so you have chosen to not go and play at the park." I dunno, for me, it's the adult who's choosing to not allow her/his child to play at the park... It just doesn't feel honest to me.... But then, one of my oldest friends just told me yesterday that I'm more of a libertarian than she is. : I've never thought about whether or not I'm a libertarian before.

#33 The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier
post #36 of 132
#11 Self Help: Stories by Lorrie Moore
I'm not sure how I felt about this collection. On the whole, I did not like these stories. They lacked coherence and plot. On the other hand, there were some descriptions that resonated so deeply, it felt like a punch in the gut.

#12 The Sea of Monsters (Percy and the Olympians #2) by Rick Riordan
I'm really enjoying this series. It's campy, fluffy and fun. Definitely YA, but still enjoyable for an adult.
post #37 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
We may need to rebuild some book commonality bridges (you didn't know that was a thing, did you? official architectural term) but we'll probably be able to do that soon.
Well, when you read the one about the guy wanting to write a bestseller, we'll find out for sure because I really loved that one.
post #38 of 132
"Love, Rosie" by Cecelia Ahrens

Quote:
Cecelia Ahern's Rosie Dunne is the amusing story of Alex and Rosie, best friends who grow up together in Ireland and stay close throughout cross-continental moves, marriages, parenthood, family dramas. and professional triumphs. Friends for close to 50 years, the potential for romance between the pair is always under the surface, yet never seems to find the right time or place to become a reality.

A series of emails, letters, and other correspondences make up the narrative of this book. Its not an entirely novel idea (no pun intended) but one that works even in this case. However, I think the book could have been shortened quite a bit (the whole divorced chat room scenario seemed irrelevant to the overall plot). About 3/4ths through it, I found myself skipping large chunks just to get to the end.

Rosie and Alex seemed destined to make mistake after mistake when it comes to love and life -- though it bothered me that Alex is considerably more financially successful.

When I did finally finish it, I felt a bit melancholy. I think the ending was supposed to be happy and make people believe in the power of love. But the proceeding chapters were so full of sadness, bad choices and even death that it left me feeling letdown.

Overall, its a meandering and depressing love story.
post #39 of 132
#12 - A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett

I hadn't read this since I was a girl, when I just loved it. Some rather odd class and race stuff going on, actually, given when it was written...but still was fun to re-visit it. I think I'm ready to return to grown-up books, though.
post #40 of 132
#13 Blood Promise (Vampire Academy #4) by Richelle Mead
I really liked this installment. It wrapped up the loose threads from the previous book while laying the groundwork for the next one. It did, in parts, seem a lot like Buffy, but I liked Buffy.
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