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How do you like homeschooling in your state? - Page 2

post #21 of 54
i live in PA...and while I havent had to do the reporting yet, I've done all the research know what is expected of me....notorized affidavit, submitting objectives, some testing, attendance and medical documentation, covering specific subjects, submitting portfolios and logs of work and materials, yearly evaluation and report, etc...............i dont think it's not do-able, but i certainly wish we didnt have all of these requirements!
post #22 of 54
AZ is great... just file the affidavit the year you start (or the year the kid turns 7) and no one ever bothers your again.... I love it and its probably the only thing I love about AZ right now.
post #23 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by laundrycrisis View Post
Illinois is really easy. No registration required. No testing. Nothing to turn in.

The only downside to this is that if a family is investigated for possible truancy, and sometimes it happens, the burden is completely on the parents to prove that they are homeschooling in the required subjects and that the children are receiving an education that is equivalent to public school, and the law does not clarify what would count as proof. For that reason, I am keeping pretty detailed records about everything we cover each day, just in case I ever need them.
I am in IL and have never had to do a thing.....and am about to graduate my oldest this spring. As far as the truancy issue, I have only heard of that being a problem for families who did not properly and officially withdraw their kids from the public school. I have never heard of that issue for families whose kids have never attended school.

In IL homeschool=private school.
post #24 of 54
I live in upstate New York, this is our first year of home schooling. The paper work is a pain and so is the record keeping. How hard it is seems to vary from district to district. Our district doesn't seem to care as long as my kid isn't costing them time and money, he's eligible for OT that we pay for ourselves. The next district over is a stickler for dead lines, investigating home schoolers and making strange and illegal demands.

Since we live in the area because of DH's job, I'd be happy to move at some point. I love the area and the people (lots of friends), but the economy sucks, the taxes are high, COL is insane (except house prices), and it's cold. Compared to VT, where we lived before my job is sadly diminished in terms of both responsibilities and scope of practice. However, I would not want to home school in VT.
post #25 of 54
We live in Oklahoma and currently have complete freedom to homeschool without interference. Like many states it seems that our legislature does something almost every year that could affect us, but so far so good. The local universities are also friendly to homeschoolers and I think that's a major consideration.

The only negative is that some families get really harassed after pulling their kids out of school. We've always homeschooled but I've met folks who had CPS at their home shortly after deciding to homeschool - not fair.

Overall we love it and don't have to report anything.

Warm regards in the soggy snow,

Lucie
post #26 of 54
We live in VA and operate under the Religious Exemption clause which exempts us from any government interference.
post #27 of 54
I live in PA and have talked about the laws w/ some hsers and they say it looks worse than it is. It must not be THAT bad b/c I know some people who are as dumb as rocks who hs their kids here and have had no problems w/ the authorities. I do wish that my state did not have so many laws about it, though. Bonus is, if you never sign your kid up for school, you do not have to start keeping records until they are eight. As in, dds bday is in April, so it would be the fall that she would technically be going into the third grade before I had to turn anything in to anyone.
post #28 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by laundrycrisis View Post
Illinois is really easy. No registration required. No testing. Nothing to turn in.

The only downside to this is that if a family is investigated for possible truancy, and sometimes it happens, the burden is completely on the parents to prove that they are homeschooling in the required subjects and that the children are receiving an education that is equivalent to public school, and the law does not clarify what would count as proof. For that reason, I am keeping pretty detailed records about everything we cover each day, just in case I ever need them.
I'm in IL and don't do a thing. It's great!

I never thought about that. We were investigated by CPS about a year ago and they asked to see my "curriculum" so I showed them our many, many, many homeschooling books and other books and that was fine with them. I'm not about to start keeping records for that, though. He didn't even begin to ask for anything else. Strangely enough, he said that he loved homeschoolers and thought it was great, but that and co-sleeping warranted my being further investigated (charges were dropped as it was nonsense charges).
post #29 of 54
I am also in Illinois and have a fairly easy time with homeschooling here. In my particular area, I haven't heard of anyone getting investigated, but it might be because there's a very strong homeschool presence. The libraries, YMCA, orchestra, and the kid museum in the area have a lot of programs going on for homeschoolers, so just on participation on those alone you could show that you're doing something with schooling. I've seen the reports of other districts doing some really sketchy things though. It definitely helps to know the laws of the state backwards and forwards.

I keep fairly detailed records anyway just because of my personality-type, but I wouldn't want to have to be subjected to having to 'prove' things.
post #30 of 54
http://www.hslda.org/laws/default.asp



This map color codes the states. Stick to green and yellow for "easiest".
post #31 of 54
Kentucky is very easy. We send a letter of intent with our children's names and ages to our school district at the beginning of their school year (within 14 days). Then we are required to keep attendence for 176 instructional days (plus 6 or 8 planning days).

I'm always amazed when I hear of HS's in our state that don't bother to send in their letter of intent. Our requirements are minimal!
post #32 of 54
Thread Starter 
Thank you all so much for the many replies. Ironically, ALL the states that my DH has given me as places he would consider and could reasonably find work are red or orange on the map. We visit the finger lakes region of upstate New York often and we absolutely LOVE it there. It would be my first choice but it sounds like hell both for homeschool and vaccination laws. Since we intend to unschool and never vaccinate I'd strongly prefer to live somewhere that we aren't constantly harassed about it.
The others are North Dakota, North Carolina, Minnesota, Vermont and Pennsylvania. I love Alaska and we are cold weather people but it's not practical since we are ethical vegans and both of our families are on the east coast.
Any more advice/info on these would be really appreciated.
post #33 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by kewb View Post
I live in one of the easy states, New Jersey. It works out really well for us. No reporting and no state tests.
Nj is the easiest and there is so many fun, educational trips to do around here. Almost all parks offer homeschool classes or days and the museums do the same.
NJ, however has lots of other issues including being in the top 3 states with THE highest income/property tax. We also have a zillion "feel good " laws on the books and our government is so corrupt there is an actual book written about it, "The Soprano state"
So as far homeschooling, sneezily breezily but as far as actual living, it is too expensive and corrupt...that being said, i still love Nj for all it's culture and variety of everything including land..beach down here , mountains over there, some gorgeous farmland and of course cities. We are diverse but we pay dearly for it.
post #34 of 54
We're in New York now. I thought it would be a pain before we moved here, but it's just a bunch of paperwork.
post #35 of 54
I'm in Vermont, and I haven't found the regulations here to be a big deal so far. I was surprised to learn that this is considered one of the more difficult states for homeschooling. They recently changed the rules so that now you only have to submit a curriculum plan at the start of the year for your first two years; after that, you can just do the end-of-year assessment. The curriculum plan doesn't have to be very detailed, and the assessment is no big deal either. It's easy to put together a portfolio - just save some work samples, take some pictures of your kid doing things, keep book lists, and write up a few descriptions of what you did. You also have the option of having a licensed teacher do an assessment, or using standardized tests. I agree with the PP who said Vermont is a very homeschool-friendly state. There seem to be lots of homeschoolers and activities for homeschoolers in our area, and I have yet to meet anyone who thinks homeschooling is weird or surprising.
post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemygirl View Post
Thank you all so much for the many replies. Ironically, ALL the states that my DH has given me as places he would consider and could reasonably find work are red or orange on the map. We visit the finger lakes region of upstate New York often and we absolutely LOVE it there. It would be my first choice but it sounds like hell both for homeschool and vaccination laws. Since we intend to unschool and never vaccinate I'd strongly prefer to live somewhere that we aren't constantly harassed about it.
The others are North Dakota, North Carolina, Minnesota, Vermont and Pennsylvania. I love Alaska and we are cold weather people but it's not practical since we are ethical vegans and both of our families are on the east coast.
Any more advice/info on these would be really appreciated.
You could absolutely unschool and never vaccinate in Minnesota and be within the law. You would need to submit quarterly reports, but I know people who unschool and submit quarterly reports without any problems. I imagine the first one might be a hassle, but after that it would be easy.
http://homeschoolers.org/minnesota_law_and_forms
post #37 of 54
Also, if you're thinking Minnesota, I assume you mean near the Twin Cities as far as DH getting a job. You could live just across the border in Wisconsin and be in an even easier state for unschooling/no vax. Many, many people live just across the border in Hudson, River Falls, etc... for that smaller town environment but still very close to hang out and work in the Cities.
Good info on homeschooling in WI - http://homeschooling-wpa.org/
post #38 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama_Leah View Post
We live in VA and operate under the Religious Exemption clause which exempts us from any government interference.
So, if you claim you are homeschooling for religious reasons (we aren't, but we are Christian and we homeschool, so it isn't a complete fabrication), you don't have to be under an umbrella school or anything? Do you know if it changes if your student is special needs?
post #39 of 54
Kansas would be green on that map except that you have to register your homeschool ONE time, and can do it online. It takes about 3 minutes...you tell the the "name of the school" (which you make up) and the names and ages of the students. Every time you have a kid hit compulsory age (7yo for regular ed students, 3yo for SpEd students), you add them to the student list (a minute or so on the computer). Once you have spent a few minutes on the computer, you never have to do anything again EVER, for the life your student. No testing, nothing.

So 3-5 minutes over a lifetime is all the "oversight" you have here.
post #40 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by earthmama369 View Post
Connecticut's a good state in which to homeschool. No registering with the state, no mandatory standardized testing or portfolio review, you only have to file a letter if you've enrolled in the school system and are withdrawing, and even then, that's all you're legally required to do.
Yup.

Unfortunately we just moved from CT to RI and it is a PITA to homeschool here from what I've heard around the RI homeschool community.
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