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glasses "necessary"? - Page 2

post #21 of 71
Thread Starter 
Thanks to you all for your responses. The ones that educated me a little about it were particularly helpful ( as the doc didn't even try...). I am not one to totally trust a doctor, hands down, unless he earns my trust or can explain things...I've had quite a few experiences that have taught me that doctor's are not always right, or anywhere near it. So thank you for taking the time to clear up my confusion a bit. OF COURSE I want to help my child. That is why I am taking the time here to research and find out what is best to do... I would never deprive my child of the right to see well ! I just need to make sure I understand if the doctor is right in this situation... Sounds like he is. I may still seek a second opinion, mostly so I can have a doc who I can actually feel respect for.

Thanks!
post #22 of 71
I've had glasses since I was 7 and I can't come up with any instance in which I would have benefited from not having glasses. Being able to read, walk down the street, see people's faces, make eye contact, ski, cook, write, play piano, drive--um, basically everything in my life was possible because I got glasses when I needed them. I had no idea I was having troubles until I got the glasses and was like, "Wow! There are words on that chalkboard!" I can't imagine what I would've missed out on if my parents hadn't taken immediate action when told I needed glasses.
post #23 of 71
[QUOTE=hanbanan;15036532I may still seek a second opinion, mostly so I can have a doc who I can actually feel respect for.
[/QUOTE]

I think this is a very good idea. If you're going to get medical care, your provider should darn well explain what's going on and why. Information and education are as (if not more) important than just getting handed a prescription.
post #24 of 71
I'm an optician, for the record.

Glasses are not intended to improve your vision after they are taken off. The only thing that can accomplish permanent vision correction is surgery, which is not recommended until at least age 21 -- preferably 25.

Please get your son glasses and have him wear them. He may think he sees perfectly fine, when in fact he just sees everything the way that he has always seen it. He has no idea what perfect vision is like. I have seen hundreds of kids put on their new glasses and exclaim about things they never realized they should be seeing.

Also, many states are now requiring that your child have a vision check and corrective eyewear if needed before beginning first grade in public or private school.
post #25 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by prothyraia View Post
I think this is a very good idea. If you're going to get medical care, your provider should darn well explain what's going on and why. Information and education are as (if not more) important than just getting handed a prescription.
Sounds to me like he did explain what was going on, and the OP didn't ask further questions due to her own reluctance. JMO
post #26 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by talk de jour View Post
Sounds to me like he did explain what was going on, and the OP didn't ask further questions due to her own reluctance. JMO
I guess it would be hard to imagine if you have never had vision problems. I was always told to expect my nearsightedness to get worse with age, and it did. It didn't stop me from wearing my glasses or contacts because I needed them to see properly. The two issues--needing corrective lenses to see & the state of my vision--were never connected in my mind. I have honestly never heard of a person's vision spontaneously getting better, either. I have always thought that you either had good vision or poor vision, that it was the luck of the genetic draw. But maybe I know all of this b/c I have poor vision and come from a family of people with poor vision.

I often think about what my life would be like if I were born in medieval Europe or ancient Rome, or any time/place where someone like me (ie not royalty/elite) wouldn't be able to get glasses. I think I probably would die young. Then again, I wouldn't be here at all b/c my parents wouldn't have lived long enough to have me, because their eyesight is really bad, too. I honestly get panicky at the thought of not having contacts or glasses available to me. When I read James Kunstler's The Long Emergency all I could think was that I'd be stockpiling lenses and lens solution, not beans and rice
post #27 of 71
I think it would be good to get a second opinion since you were uncomfortable with the care your son received.



Also, here is a resource for low cost glasses

http://zennioptical.com/cart/home.php
post #28 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by superfastreader View Post
I guess it would be hard to imagine if you have never had vision problems. I was always told to expect my nearsightedness to get worse with age, and it did. It didn't stop me from wearing my glasses or contacts because I needed them to see properly. The two issues--needing corrective lenses to see & the state of my vision--were never connected in my mind. I have honestly never heard of a person's vision spontaneously getting better, either. I have always thought that you either had good vision or poor vision, that it was the luck of the genetic draw. But maybe I know all of this b/c I have poor vision and come from a family of people with poor vision.

I often think about what my life would be like if I were born in medieval Europe or ancient Rome, or any time/place where someone like me (ie not royalty/elite) wouldn't be able to get glasses. I think I probably would die young. Then again, I wouldn't be here at all b/c my parents wouldn't have lived long enough to have me, because their eyesight is really bad, too. I honestly get panicky at the thought of not having contacts or glasses available to me. When I read James Kunstler's The Long Emergency all I could think was that I'd be stockpiling lenses and lens solution, not beans and rice
Yes, I think that's exactly what it is -- it's difficult to imagine what vision problems are like if you have never had them. I have awful vision (around 20/400, in layman's terms) and I find it difficult to explain how it is to people who have never needed correction. I finally managed to explain it to DP by just having him put on my glasses : He got it then.

My SIL has a similar attitude to OP in that she has never had vision problems and just "can't understand" the need of her youngest child for glasses. It's just hard for her to understand because she has never been there.

In addition, she is always taking them off of him for pictures and "her" social events even though the poor kid is blind as a bat without them. Luckily, my brother (her DH) wears contacts and is able to keep that in check.
post #29 of 71
OP, as an optician I would recommend not going through the Internet sites for a child's glasses. Proper fit, proper child-safe materials, and measurements are really important, especially for a kid and a first pair of glasses, and it's very difficult to do that through the Internet. However, a lot of places (like Sears optical for example) are offering specials where you get the lenses free if you buy the frame; I think the frames start around $40-$50.
post #30 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by talk de jour View Post
OP, as an optician I would recommend not going through the Internet sites for a child's glasses. Proper fit, proper child-safe materials, and measurements are really important, especially for a kid and a first pair of glasses, and it's very difficult to do that through the Internet. However, a lot of places (like Sears optical for example) are offering specials where you get the lenses free if you buy the frame; I think the frames start around $40-$50.
Oops! someone mentioned being really behind on their prescription is why I posted that.
post #31 of 71
I just wanted to echo the pp's who said you should get another doctor. I don't really doubt that the previous one gave you an incorrect medical opinion, but if your child has vision issues, then he's going to be returning to the doctor at least annually, maybe every six months, and you need someone you can relate to.

My ds has been wearing glasses since he turned 3. He is very mildly farsighted, but also has slight astigmatism and exotropia (a lazy eye that turns outward). The glasses have done wonders in correcting the exotropia because he can focus more clearly, and my dh and I both noticed that he's less accident-prone now that he can see better. After the first week or so of wearing the glasses, they became like second nature to him and are absolutely not a limitation. And they're as cute as can be, too.

I'd highly recommend a second opinion and definitely filling the prescription for the glasses.
post #32 of 71
My experience with needing glasses was that my vision decline was accompanied with intense shyness (about 7yrs old). Once I couldn't see people anymore I didn't know how to react to them. By the time I started wearing glasses full time (11th grade) I had lost my ability to remember faces. Even now, 20 years later, my visual memory for people is practically non-existent. I blame this on the neural pathways atropying all those years I could see squat. It really offends people who think I ought to be able to remember who they are after meeting them a couple of times...and thats just plain embarrassing.
post #33 of 71
i too think that the doctor was referring to amblyopia when he was talking about the breain development bits. I had poor vision that went untreated for far too long as a child. I started wearing glasses when I was 12-ish, but by that time, the vision in my left eye was nearly nonfunctional, and unfixable even with corrective lenses. I can see out of that eye, but my brain has a very hard time making sense of what I'm seeing, and focusing on anything is nearly impossible. If anything were to happen to my right eye, I would be functionally blind, essentially. For this reason, I only get polycarbonate lenses, in case of an accident I want my working eye to be as protected as possible. What would have been even better is if I had gotten glasses when i needed them, and not when I was past the point of maintaining my vision. I hope your son adjusts well to his glasses, it can be hard, but it is absolutely worth it.
post #34 of 71
My eldest is 5 and started wearing glasses in September. I had a very similar reaction as the OP even though I had awful eyesight until I got LASIK at age 22. Glasses are a Godsend, but to be honest I HATED that I needed them. My swim goggles were always blurry since we couldn't afford prescription ones, and stargazing at summer camp sucked because my body heat would fog the my glasses when I was on my back in the cool night air. I felt sad when my little boy needed glasses, because I could remember all the times I was late for something because I couldn't find mine, or couldn't participate in something fully (like getting my face painted at a party) due to them.

Over the past few months though, I realised it was really my problem, not his. He seems to have taken his glasses as a real responcibility that he is proud to have. He places them in his case each night and brags about them. My 4 year old even asked when HE can have glasses I know all those little things I hated will still come up, but I'm open to letting him get contacts when he's older, and I will help him get LASIK if he wants it when he's old enough. In the mean time we just make sure to remind him to take off his glasses when wrestling with his brother, and keep his sports goggles in his gym bag. He does pretty well for a little kid
post #35 of 71
Consider Take Off Your Glasses and See.

I have friends who have done the eye exercises and resolved their "need" for glasses. The exercises can be done by children or adults. This can be started at any age.

Pat
post #36 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
Consider Take Off Your Glasses and See.

I have friends who have done the eye exercises and resolved their "need" for glasses. The exercises can be done by children or adults. This can be started at any age.

Pat
My need isn't a "need." I am legally blind without them. Would you tell someone with a spinal cord injury that they only have a "need" for a wheelchair? Trust me, I could be killed if I went without my corrective lenses. Or would you tell someone who is deaf that they only have a "need" for sign language? Not everything can be fixed by wishing it so.
post #37 of 71
I'm sorry that you are legally blind. Obviously, this potential solution for some people feels offensive to you.


Take care,


Pat
post #38 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
I'm sorry that you are legally blind. Obviously, this potential solution for some people feels offensive to you.


Take care,


Pat
It is NOT a solution. It is impossible to reshape the eye with exercises no matter who writes a book about it. I'd love to see long term studies that shows that this is a viable and permanent solution, and is suitable to correct vision to the point of not needing corrective lenses any more, especially in the case of lopsided vision.
post #39 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
Consider Take Off Your Glasses and See.

I have friends who have done the eye exercises and resolved their "need" for glasses. The exercises can be done by children or adults. This can be started at any age.

Pat
Perhaps they had convergence insufficiency, or had suffered from a stroke at some point? There's no evidence for the efficiency of eye exercises for regular myopia:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15825744

J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2005 Mar-Apr;42(2):82-8.
A systematic review of the applicability and efficacy of eye exercises.
Rawstron JA, Burley CD, Elder MJ.

Ophthalmology Department, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand.

PURPOSE: To examine the current scientific evidence base regarding the efficacy of eye exercises as used in optometric vision therapy. METHODS: A search was performed of the following databases: Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, and MEDLINE. Relevant articles were reviewed and analyzed for strengths and weaknesses. Pertinent sections of classic texts were studied to provide a historical basis and to serve as a source for additional early references. RESULTS: Forty-three refereed studies were obtained. Of these, 14 were clinical trials (10 controlled studies), 18 review articles, 2 historical articles, 1 case report, 6 editorials or letters, and 2 position statements from professional colleges. Many of the references listed by the larger reviews were unpublished or published in obscure or nonrefereed sources and therefore were not accessible. CONCLUSIONS: Eye exercises have been purported to improve a wide range of conditions including vergence problems, ocular motility disorders, accommodative dysfunction, amblyopia, learning disabilities, dyslexia, asthenopia, myopia, motion sickness, sports performance, stereopsis, visual field defects, visual acuity, and general well-being. Small controlled trials and a large number of cases support the treatment of convergence insufficiency. Less robust, but believable, evidence indicates visual training may be useful in developing fine stereoscopic skills and improving visual field remnants after brain damage. As yet there is no clear scientific evidence published in the mainstream literature supporting the use of eye exercises in the remainder of the areas reviewed, and their use therefore remains controversial.

HTH!
post #40 of 71
yes, eye exercises can help convergence insufficiency, that's what my son has and he wears glasses for reading. He may or may not need them for the long term. Which is why I support parents making sure their children get proper eye treatment and wear their glasses when needed. If my son wears his glasses he can actually read, whereas before his eyes became tired very quickly and he would stop reading. I simply thought that he wasn't quite ready for reading, but he was, just his eyes were giving him difficulty.
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