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Anyone else annoyed by children being required to sell stuff?? - Page 2

post #21 of 86
When our school sends fundraising stuff home, it specifically says NOT to go door to door. It does suggest asking grandparents/aunts/uncles, but not neighbours. And as we have no relatives here, anything bought is bought by us.

But our school also has no issue with kids not participating. If one class gets a pizza party, the whole class gets it, including my dd who they have to order a GF pizza for, at more cost.
post #22 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaterBum View Post
Here's what bothers me about those sale drives. I have to spend $3.75 for the troop to get $0.25. I'm making the company rich, not the troop! So when my nieces ask me to buy cookies for their troop, I make a straight $5.00 donation. I know that doesn't help them win some T-shirt or poster, but come on! Give that money for the prizes to the troop!
Ditto! When my troop sold cookies last year & I saw the measley amount we made after A LOT of work, I said forget it! SO not worth my time. And my girls really didn't care this year that we didn't sell cookies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sha_lyn View Post
The bakery only makes about $1 per box. Most of the proceeds go to supporting the local council and service unit. No money goes to the national organization. As for incentives: some councils have elected to do away with them to allow the troops to keep more money. Others let the troops decide. Most also allow the girls to earn camp scholarships or "cookie dough" that can be applied toward paying for any council or service unit sponsored event.
Shouldn't this be for GS nationwide? In our area this is not the case, and if it is, they've done a crappy job of letting us know. They say the procedes go to lowering costs for programs, but many of the ones offered are the same or higher than what we pay as homeschoolers. So, really I don't know what all this money goes towards. Luckily, all my parents decided to pay for the fieldtrips & other things for GS. I do realize that not everyone can do this.

I will give a cash donation to scouts, but I already support our local school district with my tax money. They're not getting any more thru crapping fundraising.
post #23 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by limette View Post

Why can't donations be just for donations sake, why attach a crappy product to it. If you must actually sell something I'd be much more willing to attend an old fashioned bake sale.
I know a few people who respond to fundraising sales pitches with a straight donation and a brief note stating that they don't want/need the product, but they are happy to support the student/school/group.

It's always a good option for people who don't want the crappy product.
post #24 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by oceanbaby View Post
In Little League, kids are asked to sell the frozen cookie dough crap, and we refuse to participate. Dh volunteers as a head coach every year, so we feel like we do our part.
And why do they even need to do that? Our kids play soccer. We pay a registration fee, which includes their uniform. We pay for a soccer ball and cleats beyond the registration fee. There's no need for additional fundraising. I imagine if parents agreed to stop doing this, the organizations would find a way to exist within their means.

The only thing completely sales-related here that we get asked to do is Girl Scout cookies. We buy 4 boxes every year, and that's it. We have a small school at the Seventh Day Adventist church down the street. The kids from there come door-to-door, but it's usually direct charity, such as collecting food for the food pantry, never money or buying stuff.
post #25 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZanZansMommy View Post

Shouldn't this be for GS nationwide? In our area this is not the case, and if it is, they've done a crappy job of letting us know. They say the procedes go to lowering costs for programs, but many of the ones offered are the same or higher than what we pay as homeschoolers. So, really I don't know what all this money goes towards. Luckily, all my parents decided to pay for the fieldtrips & other things for GS. I do realize that not everyone can do this.

I will give a cash donation to scouts, but I already support our local school district with my tax money. They're not getting any more thru crapping fundraising.
Yes that is the case nation wide. The money goe toward the cost of running the camps and offices such as paying the mortage/lease/rent, utilities, employee salary etc. If anything is left then it probably goes to programs/fieldtrips, but really the cookie money pays all the over head expenses that the council has. Any money that goes to GSUSA is paid directly by the 2 bakeries (Little Brownie and ABC).
post #26 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaterBum View Post
Here's what bothers me about those sale drives. I have to spend $3.75 for the troop to get $0.25. I'm making the company rich, not the troop! So when my nieces ask me to buy cookies for their troop, I make a straight $5.00 donation. I know that doesn't help them win some T-shirt or poster, but come on! Give that money for the prizes to the troop!
Huh. Our troop gets either $0.55 or $0.65 per box, and the boxes are $3.50. The remainder goes to support, among other things, the many nice, large camps our council owns.
post #27 of 86
I wouldnt like it at all if it where required. Thankfully it is optional here or I dont know what I would do. I refuse to allow my kids to sale stuff because the people I know to ask cant afford to buy stuff like that and I know for a fact they would use their last dollar to pay for it. I am not doing to that my extended family. The other people around have kids in school so they dont need mine asking for more of their hard earned money.
post #28 of 86
I think it is wrong to put children is a position of having to sell any kid of item. I can't say no to children at my door, so I always write a donation check. The stuff they sell is always super-yucky stuff that I don't want or need.

Having said that, I LOVE GS cookies (my whole family does), so we buy lots every year from our friends.

I think I still might be a little traumatized from having to sell JUNK as a child. (campfire girls and school things).
post #29 of 86
I think kids selling to support their project or a cause can be a very good thing. But I more and more have a problem with all this prepackaged, overpriced stuff I'm expected to buy, much of which isn't a quality I'd ever buy otherwise. I paid ten bucks this year for boy scout popcorn, which was half the size as last year and came in a plastic container, rather than the metal tin from last year. It was probably $1 worth of product. I understand, the money goes to the troop and all that, and that I can just give a donation, but selling overpriced crap from a top-down source doesn't seem like the best lesson to teach kids. Frankly, I'd much rather see kids making things to sell, or mowing lawns or shoveling driveways, or some other useful or personal product or service. But I guess that's pretty idealistic of me.
post #30 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by limette View Post
Why can't donations be just for donations sake, why attach a crappy product to it. If you must actually sell something I'd be much more willing to attend an old fashioned bake sale.
Around here, at least at elementary schools, bake sales are a thing of the past. They did them when ds1 was in school, but the new healthy eating guidelines killed them off.

The groups sell crap, because crap sells. We (ds1's old Cub Scout group) tried selling flower bulbs - pretty nice ones - for two years, because one of the group committee didn't want to see food, or "garbage", as she put it. The amount of effort put in was astonishing, and the return wasn't very good, despite the reasonable payout by the bulb company. The next year, they switched to Scout popcorn - and it went over well, and sold itself. It wasn't quite as sure a hit as Girl Guide cookies, but pretty close. We also received notification from Scouts Canada that if we wanted to sell anything else, it had to be an approved fundraiser. We could wash cars, chip Christmas trees, or whatever - but not sell any product other than Scout popcorn.

I don't mind fundraisers, and dh and I took the viewpoint that ds1 was learning that sometimes you have to work to be able to play.
post #31 of 86
At that age, the kids have no clue. When my son did K the PTO had no clue.

My son's in school this year and fund raised for swimming. He knew exactly were the money was going.

He was going to wrestle but between the trash talk and their type of fund raising he quit I don't mind fundraising when they know the reason and it is fund raising with ethics. They wanted us to give out addresses to family, friends, businesses we use so they could market to them.

My girls do scouts and they have goals. They do get a small portion, but the biggest chunk of that money goes to Girl Scout regional offices to run and run camps. Considering camp prices hasn't changes in 5 years that isn't bad.

I know you don't like what or how the dad was encouraging his son to speak but I can sympathize. If he is a shy person he might need encouragement (incentive) to get up the nerves. You are not helping the child by not giving him the ability to ask.
post #32 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeldamomma View Post
I may be biased, but I think it can be good for kids to sell things, if they want to, of course. It gives them the experience of speaking with neighbors and other adults in the community with whom they might not otherwise communicate. It teaches them how conduct a transaction--explaining the product, asking someone for the right amount of money, counting back change, saying thank you and you hand them the product... These are useful skills, and it can be empowering for kids to know that they earned the money for whatever.
Yep, learning to talk to all kinds of folks is a great skill. I always play the fund raising by ear. If its a product I don't care for.. I don't have the kids sell it. If its a good product, I send my kids out by buddy system and cell phones to the neighbors. I never explain or apologize either way. Kids are older teens now and they have never had any trouble selling OR not selling.
post #33 of 86
Moved from Learning at Home and Beyond to Parenting...
post #34 of 86
I completely agree with the original poster. Our son is in public school. We pay our taxes and contribute to whatever school activities he attends. We've never done the fundrasier selling stuff because it makes me uncomfortable to ask neighbors to support my kid's activities, it makes my son uncomfortable approaching people for this reason and mostly the stuff they are selling is crap.

I do make sure his teacher knows at the beginning of the year that we don't participate in door to door stuff and if there is a need for money to let us know so we can decide if he should attend and how much it will cost. Money is not super tight for us and so I've also paid extra at times when I thought the event was especially valuable and I know some kids don't have the funds to participate.
post #35 of 86
Only when they have to do it for public school, mainly because it's not voluntary and remember the amount of pressure put on us when I was in school to get out there and SELL STUFF! I hated it. If they started their own business and were selling stuff they made themselves, I would find it awesome and a great show of initiative.
post #36 of 86
Right there with you OP!! I refuse to buy anything from kids selling door to door. I find it inappropriate at best, manipulative and exploitative at worst.

While I am hardly a subscriber to a sex offender in every home scenario, I do get nervous seeing these little girls showing up on my doorstep selling stuff and there is no parent in sight. It drives me bonkers and I just wonder what they are thinking.

My son does not need to learn how to sell cheap crap made in China, or cookies or pizza dough loaded with artificial products that I don't serve at home. And he can learn to talk to different kinds of people without being forced into selling stuff so a company I don't care for can make a big profit.

Those skills can be developed in many other ways-volunteering or an after school part time job. NOT by hawking junk to neighbors and strangers.
post #37 of 86
The problem is people want something for their money (out PTO has run into this issue). When kids come around selling stuff, I just give them money and tell them I don't need whatever they are selling but want to support them. I wish sometimes with school fundraisers that they just leave a blank or make a comment on the forms that if you wish to make a donation instead, it is fine (and the fundraiser is not required). As far as the pizza party thing... That always bothers me when I hear schools so that.
post #38 of 86
We refuse to participate both ways - buying or selling. I find it ridiculous at best.
post #39 of 86
I don't have a problem saying no to kids who sell stuff door to door -- just a simple "Not today, thanks. Good luck!" and a smile doesn't seem particularly ruthless to me.

We choose our donations carefully throughout the year, and we have a family policy about never handing money out the door or over the phone.

As for my DS participating, we don't solicit our friends and family when his school sends home the See's candy/wrapping paper/etc. forms. And actually with that stuff, we don't buy anything ourselves either. We do give a small donation for stuff like walkathons, but again, we don't solicit friends and family, and we only give the amount we're comfortable giving (usually $25) rather than the amount the school says their hoping to raise per child (usually $125).

I must be immune to peer pressure or something, because stuff like this just doesn't make me feel the least bit bad. I also don't feel pressure to have big blow-out birthday parties just because someone else does, or to dress my kids in designer clothing just because someone else does, etc. -- I'm happy doing it my way, they're happy doing it their way, and so far no one has expressed any judgment either way, so it's all good.
post #40 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by grahamsmom98 View Post
My question is why do the parents allow their children to be party to this type of blackmail and, in so many cases, actively participate in the act???
My main issue is when the kids in question - oh, like the 2-1/2 to 5-1/2 year olds at dd's Preschool - are no way going to actively participate in the act of selling.


Quote:
Originally Posted by dachshundqueen View Post
I think I'm just going to write a check for what my child needs. I don't feel comfortable having them sell either trashy goods or food. I also don't support those sales when I get harassed by small children peddling them.

If they expect that it will pay $x for my kid to go to camp, well, we'll just pay the full fee rather than the "cookie dough or popcorn" subsidized fee.

Liz
According to my sister, you can sometimes catch a little grief from other parents or from the teachers for "not being a team player." I'm not kidding, but I haven't experienced it directly....yet.


Quote:
Originally Posted by velveeta View Post
I think it is wrong to put children is a position of having to sell any kid of item. I can't say no to children at my door, so I always write a donation check. The stuff they sell is always super-yucky stuff that I don't want or need.

Having said that, I LOVE GS cookies (my whole family does), so we buy lots every year from our friends.

I think I still might be a little traumatized from having to sell JUNK as a child. (campfire girls and school things).
Back in the day--more than 35 years ago --Campfire Girl candy was pretty darned yummy. I did sell a lot of it door to door. I was old enough to choose to do so. And later, I did sell the Girl Scout cookies (no campfire girl troop when we moved). What I always liked about the candy was that we weren't taking orders--I've realized since that someone, the troop or the parents, was probably having to pay upfront for the cases.

Always hated magazine sales, so I never did much with that (passive resistance). There was a brief period in high school when the band director organized sales of citrus--fantastic oranges and grapefruit. I always felt pretty good about that, because it was such a wonderful product.
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