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Anyone else annoyed by children being required to sell stuff?? - Page 3

post #41 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by claras_mom View Post
According to my sister, you can sometimes catch a little grief from other parents or from the teachers for "not being a team player." I'm not kidding, but I haven't experienced it directly....yet.
Yeah, that's the kind of crap I'm talking about. I just don't participate in those kind of playground politics. If other parents want to think I suck for not going along with the herd on stuff like this, it just doesn't bother me. But so far, like you, I haven't noticed anyone having any sort of judgment about it, so maybe that type of stuff is less common than we think.
post #42 of 86
I get annoyed with the frequent fundraisers. I understand the schools need money, but I'd rather they ask for a donation of X amount, and call it good. Maybe it's because we don't know a lot of people out here, or have family nearby to bug to buy wrapping paper and crap, but it usually ends up being DH and I that feel obligated to purchase a few things just so my kid can win the cheesy prize. My DD did actually do well selling frozen baked good recently, due to some generous neighbors/parents of friends... but then of course when one of the little girls came by selling crap for her school, I felt like I had to reciprocate even though nothing in her catalogue was remotely appealing.

The most recent selling fundraiser sent home by my pre-k kid? Sheets! $20 or $40, depending on thread count. No way to spend less. I considering ordering a set for us, but DH was irritated by it (since I had just last week wrote a check for jump rope for heart, and another for reach for the stars reading to pay for books b/c I wouldn't let DD beg anyone else for 'pledges'). I am honestly going to have to send back the Sheets for Sale packet empty. I've just spent too much money, and the year is only half way over (and this doesn't count yearbooks, pictures, etc.).
post #43 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by claras_mom View Post
.....................................

According to my sister, you can sometimes catch a little grief from other parents or from the teachers for "not being a team player." I'm not kidding, but I haven't experienced it directly....yet.




..........................................
For a classroom I don't agree with such policies/attitudes but I have to say I do for things like Gril Scouts. As I said before we did have to start insisting that girls that don't participate should pay their own way to events that the troop has rasied money through sales to attend.

We really didn't think it was fair to all the other girls who show up for most meetings, participate in both sales (fall product and cookies) and plan events/activitie etc to foot the bill for girls that only show up for the fun stuff and never participate in the planning or fundraising. Like I said before, even if they showed up for one booth sale that was a complete bust, at least there in an effort there.
post #44 of 86
I tend to separate out the Girl Scout sales from school sponsored sales. Because I was a scout for many years and was involved as a teenager at the council level, I knew very clearly the impact of cookie sales not just on the local troop and the individuals but on the council. I can see your point about participation, but don't know exactly what I think about it. The non-participation is outside my experience. Of course...I hit scouts around about Cadette level, with a very small troop in a small town. We all pitched in. By the time I was a senior scout, it was just me. I was the troop.

I'll buy 2 boxes of cookies from any kid who comes to my door (with a sigh for the ever shrinking numbers and ever increasing price ); but I'm not so jazzed by the tables set up on campus or in front of supermarkets. Changing times - I know that there are a lot of concerns these days about kids going door to door.

But I think my sis was talking about school stuff, not about scouts (she's done both). For dd's (expensive, private) preschool fundraiser, I figured out what I might have spent and took the percentage of that that went to the school. Then I wrote a check. The director never said one word about it; I'd be very surprised if I was the only one going that route.
post #45 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by sha_lyn View Post
We really didn't think it was fair to all the other girls who show up for most meetings, participate in both sales (fall product and cookies) and plan events/activitie etc to foot the bill for girls that only show up for the fun stuff and never participate in the planning or fundraising. Like I said before, even if they showed up for one booth sale that was a complete bust, at least there in an effort there.
I guess my question there would be if you require a certain level of sales. DH and I lived in a lower income neighbourhood, and I made a fairly low salary, when ds1 was in Cubs. When they did sales, we couldn't afford to buy very much, and people in our neighbourhood (and friends and family) were in the same boat. I can remember ds1 pounding pavement and knocking on doors for a total of about 15-16 hours to sell a bare minimum amount of product. A couple boys in his troop sold at least double what he did, and none of them ever knocked on a door - they just got their parents to hand the form around. It doesn't bother me that they did that...but it does bother me that my son could have ended up being penalized by the troop, because his family, friends and neighbours didn't have much money. (To be honest, the troop would have probably decided to subsidize him, in any case, as I think they'd have felt they were slapping us in the face, otherwise. DH was a leader, and I was both the Treasurer and Registrar. Telling us our son couldn't come to camp because he didn't do enough and we were broke would have felt...icky, to everybody.)

ETA: Ooops - just noticed you said even showing up for one booth sale would be okay, so I guess my concern is null and void.
post #46 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by claras_mom View Post
According to my sister, you can sometimes catch a little grief from other parents or from the teachers for "not being a team player." I'm not kidding, but I haven't experienced it directly....yet.
I'm sorry. I pay my taxes, and pay extras for additional activities that I have my child engaged in otherwise. It is not my fault that school districts cannot budget properly nor choose to reduce the size of their administrations. Their failure to do so does not preempt my parental right to not engage in sales, and any parents who should choose to be so bold as to attempt to bully me into said foolishness have an exciting 5 minutes coming to them.

To be clear, DH and I run an international business, so I do have a clue about running a far reaching organization.

Liz
post #47 of 86
I just had a rather pleasant fundraising experience. The small local elementary school makes homemade chocolate candies (super gourmet, delicious) and Moms sell them at a table on the main drag during Valentine's Day week. Apparently the children made them themselves at school, and again the results were pretty impressive. I am not sure how much money they generated, but I think it was a positive experience for the children to learn how to bake and make such a creative delectable product! Now I am not sure how 'legal' this is, but here in northern Cali we are a little casual with things! In this circumstance I was happy to buy them.
post #48 of 86
DD's dance school does a fundraiser every year for their costumes. For every 5 boxes of cookies you sell, you get $10 to put towards your costume (which runs around $60). I toss the fundraiser stuff right in the recycle bin. Bascially, we'd be asking our friends/neighbors/family to donate money towards a costume which we are perfectly capable of affording. That makes me feel weird.

Both girls also attend a private school and they do some crappy fundraiser every year but we don't participate. I pay my tuition. That's enough.

As for GS, I totally support cookie sales.
post #49 of 86
I go back and forth. I totally support Girl Scouts and other non-profits doing sales. I run a local non-profit group, the only money we have to spend is from fundraisers. The local public schools and the wrapping paper, cookie dough, etc... annoy the heck out of me but then DD1's small private school does 3 big fundraisers a year. I do pay our tuition but the fundraiser money goes to scholarships for students who otherwise would not be there, so where do I draw the line? Honestly I would rather just write a check and be done with it, but I am not writing one 3 times a year in addition to paying what I already do pay monthly.
post #50 of 86
I hate the fundraisers and refuse to send my kids around the neighbors to sell.
They sometimes say not to knock on doors, that leaves just me, (no relatives in miles) to buy, friends have kids doing the same sales. So I gave up, I write a $10 check to the PTA in lieu of the fundraiser, they can't complain they get more than if I had ordered one crappy item i didn't want or need. My kid should still participate in the pizza party if there is one, he raised $10 for the school without giving the cookie company anything, so what.
For science camp I just paid the full amount needed for Ds to go.
For little league here they give an opt out, you pay them $20 per kid extra at sign up and no need to sell cookie dough.
The only fund raiser I've ever liked was the local discount card one. $20 card you get a free small pizza with an xtra large at the local pizza place, and 10% off at the health food store each time you shop and there was loads more on it.
I dread Dd starting school, it will start all over again, book sales, cookie sales, science camp fundraisers, on and on and on.
post #51 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by MCR View Post
I write a $10 check to the PTA in lieu of the fundraiser, they can't complain they get more than if I had ordered one crappy item i didn't want or need. My kid should still participate in the pizza party if there is one, he raised $10 for the school without giving the cookie company anything, so what.
I agree.

In my DS's preschool, they had a Trike-a-thon and the class that raised the most money got a pizza party (or something, I can't remember the specific reward). But DS's class at the time had 4 students in it, and other classes had 10 or 12. Such bad planning. I would rather have my DS invite some friends over for a pizza party at our house than have him feel bad because his class that's 1/3 the size of other classes was (obviously) unable to raise the most money.

That experience kind of soured me on the whole competitive nature of fundraising in general, and now I'm inclined to do stuff like the poster I quoted -- give a check directly to the school and bypass the whole ridiculous thing.
post #52 of 86
Well, I just paid $8 for a dozen glazed donuts b/c a kid who lives down the street was selling for some team he is on. The kids always look so nervous and desperately hopeful when they show up at my door with their order sheets that I can never say no. I always end up with junk food or expensive wrapping paper that we don't need, too bad no one is out selling fruit!
post #53 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post
In my DS's preschool, they had a Trike-a-thon and the class that raised the most money got a pizza party (or something, I can't remember the specific reward). But DS's class at the time had 4 students in it, and other classes had 10 or 12. Such bad planning.
Those in charge should be doing it per capita, and averaging each class's donations by the number of kids. That's how our school does it (k classes seem to be around 17, the grade 8s are close to 30).
post #54 of 86
We used to sell chocolate bars as kids. One elderly man and his wife would always buy the bars, then give them to us to eat. we loved his house. An alternative to keeping the junk is to give it back to the kids
post #55 of 86
I'm American but now live in Europe. I'm *so so* glad that, where I live, kids don't have to sell all this crap. We pay a small fee (about the equivalent of $50) at the start of each school year to cover expenses and an extra fee for the class trip (usually around $40). If parents can't pay, there is an extra fund to help low-income families.

There are fees to join sports clubs for kids (sports generally aren't done through the school). The city gov't has a special fund to help pay the registration fees for low-income kids (and I don't mind my tax euros going to that at all!). Some very low-income clubs (usually soccer or swimming clubs serving predominately low-income areas) sell lottery tickets at the equivalent of about $3 a piece to help fund their activities. We always buy a few. And that's it . .. .

I would much rather just make a flat donation than be hit up to buy tons of over-priced crap I don't want or need. I also don't like that so much of the profit goes to the companies and not to the organization.

I agree that it can be positive if kids learn to not just ask for money. So have a bake sale, car wash, etc., etc. In most cases, I feel like kids aren't even learning to sell. Their parents are learning quid pro quo with their co-workers and neighbors!
post #56 of 86
I think they have some pros to them... that child who was terrified to do his pitch may learn to overcome that fear through doing activities like that. It can be a good way for children to learn to speak to people, and a good way to show support for a team, or class, or whatever.
post #57 of 86
this used to really bother me but not any more. My children may sell if they want to but it is all them. they have to go out and take orders and deliver. our neighborhood is saturated with kids so most kids don't sell anything except to family in other parts of town. There is no penelty for not participating. honestly I would rather send a $10 check than buy a $10 loaf of bread. but I do not even do that much.

I do not mind when other children knock on our door. good for them taking the inititive and working hard. However I also have no problem saying no to over priced junk food and wrapping paper. chocolate bars on the other hand........

I think it is great when kids decide to raise funds though!! for whatever charity strikes them. if you do not want to give don't. honestly my kids do not remember who said no and yes. all they know is they made some money to help someone. trick or treating for unicef - my kids love this and I love it when kids come trick or treating. its a quarter! no big deal. and it helps them be a part of something so much bigger.

I also wanted to add, any prizes for sales fundraisers are individual, not class parties. My dd is on student council and to raise money for the supplies (they are making care packs for haiti) four difffernt teachers and the principal are just putting collection jars outside their doors (penny war, every penny add 1 point... nickles, dimes and quarters in the jar subtract points, so much more fun than selling wrapping paper and candles). the whole school will participate in the party after ward. the winning teacher gets to ductape the loosing one to the gym wall
post #58 of 86
i also wanted to add that I am so thankful our band did fundraisers. I had a real job but it went to pay for everything else in my life (clothes, Dr. appointments, school supplies) and I would not have been able to go to the band trips had I not raised enough extra by selling stuff. My friend and I busted our butts! it sucked but had it not been for the $300 we earned selling frozen pizza and cookie dough to our neighbors we woud not have been able to go. Scholarships were available but only if you had done some fundraising. Tax dollars did not cover band trips and the competition was good for us. and the trip was fun. and educational. Our band director was brilliant with money and managed to make the fundraising sucessful and the trip inexpensive. but still.

I don't neccesarily always have money or want what they are selling (part of a good fudraiser is selling something people want at a price point they can afford) and when I do not want it or do not think it is a good value I feel no guilt saying no. if it is a cause I really support I will just give a donation to the organization or to that child.
post #59 of 86
My 7 year old comes home with some dumb fundraiser everyother day it drives me batty because she coems home on how shes must sell so they can get so and so prize ect.. I will NOT allow my 7 year old to go door to door selling so we jsut don't if I think its a worth while cause we will donate a bit to the pot and once in a blue moon I might ask a few friends I know if they might be intrested but that is it. When she is older shes can choose to try or not but not at this age.

Deanna
post #60 of 86
I haven't read all the replies so maybe someone has mentioned this already. But the real problem is how schools are funded. When I was teaching I hated, hated, hated the fundraisers, but they funded very important programs for the children, such as afterschool/extracurricular activities that required purchasing anything, including all sports, the garden club, the sewing club, etc... For many kids, being at these after school activities was their only option besides being home alone. Those funds also paid for scholarships for field trips for kids whose parents couldn't afford it. Once my department used money obtained in this way to pay for science equipment that was outside our allotted budget. I wouldn't be surprised if some schools fundraised for text books.

I came to the conclusion that until schools are better funded, fundraisers are a necessary evil. If you really don't want to buy anything, say no. Or lobby for better school funding or another way to pay for the above.
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