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Anyone else annoyed by children being required to sell stuff?? - Page 4

post #61 of 86
I HATE fundraisers and especially required fundraising.

My DSD goes to a private school and they have a mandatory fundraising obligation of $400/per kid.

The kicker is they get such a small percentage of whatever crap they are selling towards their $400, they would literally have to be out everyday selling.

DH and I are going to end up just donating money directly to her fund... well we are hoping we are allowed to do that because most of the fundraisers she has had so far are absolute crap that we do not eat or would not use.

We did fall for the entertainment book with coupons... though every coupon we have tried to use so far the establishent has decided to no longer honor them. Terrific... what a waste of $20 that DSD only received a $1 towards her $400 fund anyway.

Ugh... yeah... don't get me started on this. lol
post #62 of 86
I am sort of mixed. In grade 8 we sold quite a few things (Christmas ornaments-which I still have, figurines, Salt and Pepper shakers etc) these were sold to raise money for our Grade 8 trip. I had a lot of fun doing it because I was earning money to do our big trip (one week trip by bus to Toronto -9h bus ride). I also did Jump-Rope for Heart and did fund raising for that. UNICEF-we were given them at school but I didn't have to take mine out.
post #63 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSMa View Post
I HATE fundraisers and especially required fundraising.

My DSD goes to a private school and they have a mandatory fundraising obligation of $400/per kid.

The kicker is they get such a small percentage of whatever crap they are selling towards their $400, they would literally have to be out everyday selling.

DH and I are going to end up just donating money directly to her fund... well we are hoping we are allowed to do that because most of the fundraisers she has had so far are absolute crap that we do not eat or would not use.

We did fall for the entertainment book with coupons... though every coupon we have tried to use so far the establishent has decided to no longer honor them. Terrific... what a waste of $20 that DSD only received a $1 towards her $400 fund anyway.

Ugh... yeah... don't get me started on this. lol
REally? $1? Cause our Home and School just did this one, and the books sold for $20, and we got $12.50 for each book sold.
post #64 of 86
"My DSD goes to a private school and they have a mandatory fundraising obligation of $400/per kid."


Aaaaaugh. I am on the board of my daughter's preschool, which is attached to our house of worship, and they have an annual fundraising goal of $3,000 that goes right to the general fund. Profits from tuition don't count towards it. This is separate money that we parents are supposed to raise, that benefits the temple in general rather than the preschool - and half of our families aren't even Jewish!

So, I've spent a lot of time this year saying "no, the parents aren't interested in forming a PTO to organize fundraisers. The preschool is already a profit center for the temple. No, I am not going to ask parents to give more time and money so the preschool can be MORE of a profit center. No. NO. NO."

As a parent, I want to send my child to a school that has a sound a sustainable and non-exploitative business model - i.e., they charge in tuition what it costs to run the place, and don't try to suck more money out of the families in myriad pain-in-the-butt ways throughout the year.

Geez, I guess I also have strong feelings on this issue.
post #65 of 86
While fund raising is a pain, it's unfortunately a necessity in our area.

Our school is seen as a wealthy neighborhood school. We have some very nice houses in our area, and this makes us seen as 'rich' on the whole.

The truth of the matter is that our school has a 40% poverty rate, and that our wealthy parents are being hit by the economy and just don't have the funds to donate anymore.

Our PTO at school supports the library, field trips, a school age jump roping club, gives money to the teachers for their classrooms, helps pay for upgrades to make playground equipment safe, and the list goes on and on. 100% of the money earned goes back to the school.

We used to run a "No Fundraiser Fundraiser" which asked for donations from parents so we didn't need to do fundraisers. The first year was awesome, and the second year was abysmal. We fell short of our budget by over $5,000!

If our parents can't give outright to the school, we need to find alternate ways to make the money for the school. Especially since our schools budget will be cut over 25% in the next three years. I am sure that the parents in our school complaining about fund raising will complain even louder if we cut their kids extra curriculars, libraries and classroom supplies.

If I have to put some effort into making sure that my sons get the education that they deserve, I am totally willing to do it.
post #66 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeldamomma View Post
It certainly gets over-done, and I'm tired of being hit up for things like sending a bunch of 14 year old strangers to China to play soccer (I'd like to go to China too, but I'm not going door-to-door asking other people to pay my way ).
Honestly! This type of thing is out of control where I live. The "fundraising" by the selective, travelling sports teams is awful, the parent's should be ashamed of themselves for allowing it to go on.

In my area, travelling soccer and softball teams are big. Participation is invitation only. The team, coaches, and parents travel up and down the East Coast to play in tournaments. This is not AYSO or little league type of teams. The clubs are private, elitist (not all but the majority) selective and most definately not open to all kids.

Have at it, sports can be great for kids but it absolutely baffles me that they (adults involved whether they are coaches or parents) think it is ok to ask other people to subsidized a child's (and parent's) hobby.

These "teams" stand outside of Wal-Mart or at the gas stations with cans, panhandling for cash so they can go to a tournament in Virginia Beach. No thank you!

I ruffled many feathers when I worked in banking. Between my fellow employees and the customers, I was getting hit up all the time. While I made a point to be polite, I had no problem saying no and if they pressed me, I told them my opinion on the subject.

As far as school fundraisers - The cookie dough makes me want to scream! My DH is such a sucker for that type of stuff. He has learned by now that he better think twice about ordering mass quanities. I remember once he bought one of each type and 2 or more of his favorites from the daughter of a friend. It was over a $100. I had a fit.
post #67 of 86
Oh and when I went to catholic school, which yes, is private school, but not for profit schools, which IIRC, is the type of school JSMa dsd goes to. Anyway, there was even less money for extra curriculars than at public school. When I was there, for our activities fee it was either $200 or sell raffle tickets. The raffle tickets sold pretty well. Anyway, if you didn't sell, you couldn't attend dances or do activities. This didn't include sports- for sports there were additional fees and fundraisers.
post #68 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie View Post
"My DSD goes to a private school and they have a mandatory fundraising obligation of $400/per kid."


Aaaaaugh. I am on the board of my daughter's preschool, which is attached to our house of worship, and they have an annual fundraising goal of $3,000 that goes right to the general fund. Profits from tuition don't count towards it. This is separate money that we parents are supposed to raise, that benefits the temple in general rather than the preschool - and half of our families aren't even Jewish!

So, I've spent a lot of time this year saying "no, the parents aren't interested in forming a PTO to organize fundraisers. The preschool is already a profit center for the temple. No, I am not going to ask parents to give more time and money so the preschool can be MORE of a profit center. No. NO. NO."

As a parent, I want to send my child to a school that has a sound a sustainable and non-exploitative business model - i.e., they charge in tuition what it costs to run the place, and don't try to suck more money out of the families in myriad pain-in-the-butt ways throughout the year.

Geez, I guess I also have strong feelings on this issue.
her dsd goes to catholic school. catholic schools are non profit and barely get enough money to operate.
post #69 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by MomOf3boyz View Post
While fund raising is a pain, it's unfortunately a necessity in our area.

Our school is seen as a wealthy neighborhood school. We have some very nice houses in our area, and this makes us seen as 'rich' on the whole.

The truth of the matter is that our school has a 40% poverty rate, and that our wealthy parents are being hit by the economy and just don't have the funds to donate anymore.

Our PTO at school supports the library, field trips, a school age jump roping club, gives money to the teachers for their classrooms, helps pay for upgrades to make playground equipment safe, and the list goes on and on. 100% of the money earned goes back to the school.

We used to run a "No Fundraiser Fundraiser" which asked for donations from parents so we didn't need to do fundraisers. The first year was awesome, and the second year was abysmal. We fell short of our budget by over $5,000!

If our parents can't give outright to the school, we need to find alternate ways to make the money for the school. Especially since our schools budget will be cut over 25% in the next three years. I am sure that the parents in our school complaining about fund raising will complain even louder if we cut their kids extra curriculars, libraries and classroom supplies.

If I have to put some effort into making sure that my sons get the education that they deserve, I am totally willing to do it.
This exactly.
post #70 of 86
I just don't do the fundraisers.I don't have the money,and neither do my family and friends.Ds just came home with the frozen cookie dough and cake sale.It went right in the recycle bin.I would rather give a small donation directly to the school.I do the book sales though.My kids get books at a good price,and the classroom gets books for free.Once a year they have a buy one get one free bookfair and we love that.
post #71 of 86
Ok, I haven't read through all the posts, so I may be repeating or stepping into a hornets nest, but the thing that really really bugs the holy crap out of me is when daycares -- private businesses! -- do fundraisers. My goodness, the exorbitant tuition isn't enough?

But yes, in general, all school fund raisers annoy me. In many cases, I'd rather give a kid $5 for his club or school than to spend $15 on some junk that I don't need and that his school is only going to get a cut of a few dollars for.

I do love that frozen cookie dough, though

ETA: And I'll always buy GS cookies. yum.
post #72 of 86
ETA: And I'll always buy GS cookies. yum.

THAT.

Having skipped all 70+ replies, I LOATH school fundraisers.

My kids get to pick one, and only one, for the entire year. DH and I take them to work, exchange with the other parents, and that's that.

GS Cookies are the one off. Samoas have a siren call
post #73 of 86
In general I am fine with kids selling for various reasons. If they are fundraising for a "fun" activity or sports team etc. I like that they have the experience of selling and that they don't expect donations for whatever activity etc they have planned. I like that they aren't relying on donations. (even if the stuff they are selling isn't my first choice in product)

In my area kids seem to sell useful things, salt (they even deliver it and cart it into my house) wreaths/christmas trees/garland (also delivered) etc.

The scenerio described however seems excessive.
post #74 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by MomOnDaEdge View Post
ETA: And I'll always buy GS cookies. yum.

THAT.

Having skipped all 70+ replies, I LOATH school fundraisers.
GS cookies do seem to be a league all their own. My DD is a GS, and when we sold in our neighborhood this year, all but one house that had people at home bought cookies. The girls did their tunk sell at a gas station and sold cases and cases. It's really nice because our troop is economically diverse and this way all the girls can decide on activities together and they all made the money together. It really is better than the parents with money just writing checks for what their kids want to do. And it is good for the kids to handle the money, talk to people, etc.

A lot of fundraisers,though, I just don't get. The frozen cookie dough at the school, for example. The kids aren't supposed to go door to door. We don't have extended family, and DH can't take things like that to work. So I let each of my kids pick out one thing of dough and that's that.

And I kinda hate it when kids come to my door selling something that I don't want. I'd really like to always be able to say *yes.*
post #75 of 86

a way around it......

A couple of years ago, I went to the PTA meeting and made the suggestion that an option be added for all the parents instead of doing the fundraising.

First, let me explain that often the fundraiser had a prize at the end (for example, that year it had been a party with a bunch of inflatables in the gymnasium for all kids who sold a certain amount of money (which meant the school's portion was $30).

I suggested the PTA make it an option from then on that any parent who wished to opt out of the fundraiser but wanted to give money to the PTA could give the $ amount needed for their kid(s) to get to go to the party/get the award, and they agreed!

I didn't see how it worked out the next year b/c my dd wanted to be homeschooled so we did, but I heard from friends that they were very grateful to be able to just write a little check and be done with it - especially for those fundraisers that took place @ the holidays (you know, the ones where you have to deliver all that giftwrap, boxes of candy, sausage/cheese, etc.)!

Also, my standard response (b/c I work at one of the schools part-time and get hit up by @ 100 students every time there's a new fundraiser) is to just say, "Thank you but I've already ordered."
post #76 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommy2maya View Post
her dsd goes to catholic school. catholic schools are non profit and barely get enough money to operate.
Yes... she goes to a Catholic school... and yes they do not have enough money to operate, hence them not having a music or art teacher....

But then they should raise their tuition, not have some unattainable fundraising goal to meet that the parents end up writing a check out for anyway.

Seriously, DSD would have to sell thousands of dollars of crap to meet her goal... and let's be realistic... she is 5, so she isn't selling anything... her parents are.
post #77 of 86
I have a personal beef with fundraising because I had similar experience to the kid you describe when I was a kid.

Cookie season was torture for me. I have an emotionally abusive mother who I was always trying to please. She sat back and watched me struggle as an introverted kid trying to talk to strangers, horrible at math trying to make change, getting lectured by old me about how I should know how to do figures in my head. Besides what she bought, I usually didn't do very well with cookies sales, and there was always the implied "letting the troop down" thing, plus listening to the parents brag about "MY daughter sold X number of boxes this year!" just made me sick.

I loved scouting and the activities that went with it, but if I was a parent of a kid like me, I would never require my kid to do the selling.

When I was in marching band and we did fundraiser after fundraiser for stupid crap that no one wanted so that everyone could pay for tour or uniforms or whatever (every kid had to raise a certain amount or pay out of pocket), I got a job instead. I couldn't stand the idea of having to call up my family members and pitch to them.

This really all goes back to the "give something to get something" model. The adults will only pay out if they're getting some food or cheap product in return (and let's face it, GS cookies are nothing like they used to be), and kids have to be bribed into selling by promises of pizza etc. I realize that not all fundraisers are like this, but I despise the ones that are.
post #78 of 86
I'm never thrilled about fundraisers, and we do participate loosely, my kids will never be the top sellers though! I have seen how the money is used, seen the impact it can have on an organization that is tight for funds. I do give to some kids that come door to door, and not others. Mostly based on who we know, but other things like Girl Scouts, we choose to support (and this year I had my own cookie-selling Daisy Scout).

My DD's school just does a fun-run, it's their only fund-raiser and it's direct-donation. I was glad to see that! However, what upset me is when everyone who raised over X for the fun-run at school, got a pizza party. I was upset for two reasons, first of all that the healthy aspect they focused on with the run was squashed by the reward of pizza, and mostly, because although *WE* had family and friends who could afford to donate enough for DD to make that mark, I'm sure there were others that couldn't. The idea of this sort of reward, in this economy, seemed very, well, hurtful to those who weren't able to participate due to finances. Next year I am planning on sitting on the committee so I can be more involved with this and hopefully make an impact on what happens.
post #79 of 86
The fundraisers drive me insane. I like the trashbags and GS cookies but I don't like useless junk. They never have magazines I would be interested in.

I'll donate to organizations like jumprope for heart, march of dimes reading drive, breastcancer marches, and other things where people do things to raise funds but I DO NOT WANT little figurines or expensive wrapping paper.

We will go to fundraising meal things like pancake breakfasts, taco dinners, spaghetti dinners and I am a sucker for a church bake sale. I will go to fundraising car washes.

I just mostly do not want stuff that sits around collecting dust and I don't want to pay $15 for cookies (which dd's karate is doing atm)

I would rather pay to have people take my stuff than sell it to me

I will give you twenty dollars to get this couch out of my house while my husband isn't here! I wish someone would call me about stuff for a rummage sale
post #80 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by MomOnDaEdge View Post
Samoas have a siren call
Don't you mean thin mints? As far as I'm concerned they come in a box that's just two servings.
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