or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Special Needs Parenting › **Update** It's all falling apart...transition from EI to IEP
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**Update** It's all falling apart...transition from EI to IEP - Page 2

post #21 of 41
Thread Starter 
I called Ohio School for the Deaf and the person with the information on what constitutes an educational interpreter is out today, but can call me back tomorrow morning.
post #22 of 41
I agree with khaoskat on "least restrictive environment" (LRE) and making play independently with peers a goal. They can't possibly meet these, and LRE is guaranteed by Federal law.

I would print out the requirements for an interpreter and ask to see the qualifications of whomever is working with your child. Or better yet, meet him/her in person and ask them directly so there's no pussy-footing.

Also, if they can't do this in 2 weeks time, push to move forward with putting him in the other district's program at least until the end of the year or until they find a qualified interpreter. Usually, the IEP covers 1 full year and to change it before then requires your agreement. If there is a SINGLE THING you do not agree to in the IEP, cross it out, note the change and initial it. But get some kind of IEP in place that locks them in.

Blech. Double blech.

And yes, be a lioness, but remember to be somewhat diplomatic and always listen to what they have to say. Sometimes you can find workable stuff in what they say; or sometimes, they hang themselves. I don't envy your position. I had to be a lioness for 2 years... but I got what ds needed without getting a lawyer.
post #23 of 41
Why can't you just say that you've moved into that other district? Get a PO box or something. You could just say 'you guys really pushed our family into moving, so that's what we're doing, yada yada yada.' IDK, seems easier to me, but I know nothing about these things. Will be sending good thoughts your way
post #24 of 41
Ok, found this information for you ---- (again, bolding is mine to make key points for you to see).

The number of interpreting hours per day must be specified in writing. As with all IEP supports and services, there is no charge for Related Services. Because educational interpreting is a Related Service, an educational interpreter is a member of the IEP team for any deaf or hard of hearing student receiving this service.

Here is what seems to be an excellent website about this topic...and where the above comes from.

http://www.classroominterpreting.org/parents/law.asp

Here is another interesting tidbit/quote from the above..under the RED FLAG section....

Even in states with minimum requirements, school districts can often contract unqualified individuals as an emergency hire.

Ok, if you go under the Administrator section (look on the Upper left hand corner), you will find this as a basic guideline...

Minimum qualifications of an educational interpreter should include:

* A formal assessment of interpreting skills
o An Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment (EIPA) score of at least a 4.0
o Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) certification
o NAD-RID certification (NIC) at a certified level
o NAD certification of at least a 4.0
* Degree or coursework in an educationally-related field
o BA degree (preferred)
o Graduate of an Interpreter Training Program
o 24 – 30 credit hours of educational coursework
* A formal assessment of content knowledge related to educational interpreting (for example, a passing score on the EIPA Written Test)
* The ability to perform as a professional member of the educational team (For example, as stated in the Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment Code of Professional Conduct).


Direct link to page... http://www.classroominterpreting.org...ifications.asp


Another good link from that site...

http://www.classroominterpreting.org...ional_team.asp


Ok, after looking over some of that information, not only will you potentially need the Interpreter, but also an Aide (to do the things that you mentioned like watching while he eats, etc). That the roles of the two are not the same.

Here is another link that is excellent, by the School for the Deaf in Ohio....each of the blue links is a PDF file, and it has excellent resources. I recommend printing it off and taking it with you to the school. They may not realize how much work is involved in this.

http://www.ohioschoolforthedeaf.org/...uidelines.aspx
post #25 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by BabyMae09 View Post
Why can't you just say that you've moved into that other district? Get a PO box or something. You could just say 'you guys really pushed our family into moving, so that's what we're doing, yada yada yada.' IDK, seems easier to me, but I know nothing about these things. Will be sending good thoughts your way
The school district where the program she wants requires physical proof of residency. Trust me, I have been with them for 2 1/4 years now, and am transitioning to Kinder next year. Even though my child has been in the system and registered for 2 1/4 years, we still have to provide proof of residency (in the form of a utility bill), we have to go through the hoops just like everyone else. They wont be fooled by getting a PO box. If you live in an apartment, they will want copy of lease or landlord statement.

Additionally, there is no saying she will get into the classroom she wants into. If the room is already full and there is no student that can be moved, then she will end up with the same problems.

Even though my son has no hearing impairment, I would have loved to keep him up with his ASL he was learning in EI. He still has major issues outside of "normal" conversation - if he gets flustered, upset, angry, confused he loose most of his verbal speech abilities. You can see him and his mind working trying to form the words he is trying to get out and stuttering through a lot of it.
post #26 of 41
I would make sure you write clear concise measureable goals for everything in the IEP.

I would also request that the IEP meeting be continued out until they have hired the Educational Interpreter as that person is considered part of the IEP team and needs to be there.

Good luck. I know I have probably over loaded you with links to information, but I am trying to be helpful as I have felt helpless in the school transition myself. I am also feeling that way right now with going from pre-school to school based.
post #27 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by khaoskat View Post
The school district where the program she wants requires physical proof of residency. Trust me, I have been with them for 2 1/4 years now, and am transitioning to Kinder next year. Even though my child has been in the system and registered for 2 1/4 years, we still have to provide proof of residency (in the form of a utility bill), we have to go through the hoops just like everyone else. They wont be fooled by getting a PO box. If you live in an apartment, they will want copy of lease or landlord statement.
Actually, this is true where I am, too. Even for regularly registered students. And I don't even live in a decent school district. But the town next door is horrifying so we get some of those.
post #28 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by heatherdeg View Post
Actually, this is true where I am, too. Even for regularly registered students. And I don't even live in a decent school district. But the town next door is horrifying so we get some of those.
My school district is rated worst or in the bottom 5 school districts in the State.

We Ed Choice Voucher out with our oldest and are hoping to do the same this fall with our middle child. We have already talk to the private school we want to place him in, and they will do the ST if he still qualifies for an IEP after this year. Which, I am sure with his articulation being at 4% he will.
post #29 of 41
Thread Starter 
You rock, khaoskat!

I had found the OSD link, but not the other links. I think they'll be very helpful!!!

I think my general plan of attack tomorrow is to say "oh, you're offering to provide an interpreter? Great! Okay, then let's look at the requirements this person must have..." and then just overwhelm them with information. Hopefully that backs the school into a corner and they agree to send Connor to the school that already has an interpreter who meets all these requirements, at least for the remainder of this school year.

If that's not enough, then I'm going to push for him to be labeled as hearing impaired and requiring a total communication environment, which they can't provide but the other school can.

If that's not enough, then I'm going to go the route of "least restrictive environment" and "best interests of the child" and "prove to me how your program equals the other program". I'm going to push for specific goals relating to independent socialization. I'm going to point out how him being the only signing child in the class is stigmatizing. I'm going to point out how distracting it will be to the entire class to have only one child signing.

If that's not enough...I don't know...I have more up my sleeve somewhere...
post #30 of 41
I would also point out the fact to them, that the teacher is going to totally have to redo how she teaches, not just this year, but every single year he is in their school system.

Before your meeting, I would sit down and write out every single issue he has, I would do each on a separate piece of paper (or if you type a new page for each one). Then I would each issue/accomodation you want him to have. I would than prioritize them so you know which ones you are willing to compromise on.

So, it would be something like this:

Feeding/Food Issues: Connor has food allergies and has feeding/swolling issues.

1) Connor is allergic to XYZ foods.
A) There can be no contact with food X. It cannot even be brought into the classroom because of his severe allergy. Due to his severe allergy he does/does not have an Epi Pen Jr.
B) Same for each food he is allergic to. Put down how allergic, like if it is ok to be in the classroom or it cannot come into the classroom because he is so allergic (we have classes that have children so allergic to peanuts just breathing the breath of a child who had a PB sandwhich could cause an allergic reaction, so the entire classroom is not allowed any peanut products in it).

2) Connor has a swollowing disorder. He has to be monitored closely while eating and drinking to ensure that he does not choke, get the food caught, or that it goes down the right pipe.
A) Someone must sit next to him while he eats or drinks.
B) He can only have these foods due to his condition.
C) Etc...

This way you go in organized, and cannot get flustered, as they will try to rush you through the meeting and not want to take their time.

If you feel you are being brushed off and not listened to, as for the meeting to be continued to finalize all the details and goals and accomodations, but allowing enough information to be put in, so that services can start on 3/3 (or 3/4 as indicated). Then request a facilitator.
post #31 of 41
Thread Starter 
Good idea about the list. Now if I can just get this adorable 4 month old in my lap to go to sleep, LOL!
post #32 of 41
My 2 year old was like that tonight, and now this 28 weeker in the belly is going nuts.

Good luck. I sent you a PM with my cell number if you need anything else.
post #33 of 41
Thread Starter 
Update...

The meeting did not go well.

They are arguing LRE requires he stay in home district.
They are arguing that an interpreter is equivalent.
They are arguing that the whole class will learn to sign so he can socialize freely.
They are arguing a lot more that is absurd and in some cases biased against the Deaf community. They said some things that might bite them in the butt when this goes to mediation (for example, at the end the director said "there's nothing you can bring me (referring to tests, evaluations, laws, etc) that will change my mind. He's not going out of district."

I need to type it all out, but I have a fussy baby, two crazy toddlers, and I'm mentally exhausted.

I'll be back.
post #34 of 41
I am so sorry! Sounds like you are going to have to kick the fight into high gear. Just what you want to do with a baby and two toddlers.
post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2boyzmama View Post
Update...

The meeting did not go well.

They are arguing LRE requires he stay in home district.
They are arguing that an interpreter is equivalent.
They are arguing that the whole class will learn to sign so he can socialize freely.
They are arguing a lot more that is absurd and in some cases biased against the Deaf community. They said some things that might bite them in the butt when this goes to mediation (for example, at the end the director said "there's nothing you can bring me (referring to tests, evaluations, laws, etc) that will change my mind. He's not going out of district."

I need to type it all out, but I have a fussy baby, two crazy toddlers, and I'm mentally exhausted.

I'll be back.
1) LRE - means he is put into the Least Restrictive Environment. Meaning he is not pulled out of normal educational classes more than is absolutely needed. It does not mean he has to stay in district to for his education.
2) Are they talking about an ASL in general, or an Educational ASL? There is a total difference between the two. From what I have read, not only does the individual have to be proficient in ASL, but they also have to have a background in education for the level they will be signing at, so in this case Early Childhood Education.
3) Do they realize the actual cost involved in it to them. Not only does the Educational ASL need to be there for all the time he is there in this case, but they also have to be paid their time for preparing and reviewing the teacher's lesson plans so they are familiar with them.
4) The teacher is going to have to modify how S/HE does things, in that they are going to have to keep Connor close to their sight at all times, so he can watch her and watch the Educational ASL Interp. It is a coordinated effort between the two.
5) They cannot force the entire class to learn sign language. I am sure many of the parents of children in the class will be pissed off when they learn that their children will be forced to learn sign language and use it in the classroom. Not only that, but who is going to teach the kids sign language. It is not the job of the Educational ASL to teach ASL. They will have to also hire a teacher to come in and teach ASL to the students. The only responsibility of the Educational ASL is to interpret for your child.
6) Another issue comes in that, what happens when school starts up next year, there are going to be students from there moving onto Kinder at the end of this year, and new students coming in. Basically they are going to have to start him over every single year for the next two years with the socialization. Not only that, but because the kids will not be practicing the ASL over the summer (we are talking 12 weeks/3 months off), how many of them are going to retain what they learn.
7) Have they even posted the position yet? If not, when? And who are they going to bring in as a sub? Again, demand to see this person's qualifications, including educational qualifications. I believe they have to have at least some sort of teacher's license to be an Educational ASL Interp. Right now, they have 7 working days to advertise and fill the position. Do you think they are even going to be able to put together an appropriate add with all the relevant information in that short of a period of time, let alone screen and do the required background checks in the State of Ohio? Highly doubtful. It takes up to two weeks to do the criminal background checks, because they have to do fingerprints, etc. Oh, this will also have to be done for anyone they hire as a temp to fill the position, the criminal background check. IT CANNOT BE DONE. So, is he going to sit in the classroom with no one to sign for him the whole time, until it can be done?



Ok, I am off my soapbox. I just think all local districts are trying to pinch pennies in anyway they can.

I would try to work with the school for the deaf and see what they can help you with resource wise. I would also contact OCECD, and the ODE. I am sure though OCECD will probably refer you to the School for the Deaf as they will probably be your best resource.

I wonder if you can contact the Educational ASL Interp for Dayton Public, they have one, and I found her contact information on-line the other day. I think I goggled "Dayton Ohio Educational ASL Interpreters".
post #36 of 41
I am so sorry you are going through this. I have been on the other side of the table for the IEPs, and I have some limited advice.

List our under what circumstances you would be willing to not transfer (it will make you appear to be willing to compromise, even if they can not meet these circumstances).

Line up each detail of his IEP by condition. If you delineate needs due to allergies, meds, feeding, communicating, etc. In easy terms it will help. Specifically list out what accomodations each team member will need to be able to help with. The director may have made up her mind, but the rest of the team (teachers, nurse, therapist, etc have not). I have seen a director cave because the rest of the team ganged up on her.

verify that the other school has an opening. If so, ask for temporary placement until the school district can meet the needs for you IEP. Even if the had an appropriate interpreter on staff, it would be difficult to assure all the other needs could be met in so short a time.

Focus on other needs (swallowing & allergies) as well, use the terms "life threatening repercussions" if the IEP is not strictly followed. That is scary terminology for schools.

I hope it all helps. Keep us updated.
post #37 of 41
Ok, here are a few more resources for you...

http://olrs.ohio.gov/asp/olrs_SpecialEducation.asp


http://www.ode.state.oh.us/GD/Templa...&Content=74616

- See page 20 of above referenced book, particularly:
The communication needs of your child, which include listening, speaking, reading and writing. If your child is deaf or hard of hearing, the individualized education program team must consider your child’s language and communication needs. It must consider what opportunities your child will have for direct communication with classmates, teachers and therapists in your child’s language and communication mode, academic level and full range of needs. This includes opportunities for one-on-one instruction in your child’s language and communication mode


http://www.agbell.org/DesktopDefault.aspx
post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by khaoskat View Post
1) LRE - means he is put into the Least Restrictive Environment. Meaning he is not pulled out of normal educational classes more than is absolutely needed. It does not mean he has to stay in district to for his education.
2) Are they talking about an ASL in general, or an Educational ASL? There is a total difference between the two. From what I have read, not only does the individual have to be proficient in ASL, but they also have to have a background in education for the level they will be signing at, so in this case Early Childhood Education.
3) Do they realize the actual cost involved in it to them. Not only does the Educational ASL need to be there for all the time he is there in this case, but they also have to be paid their time for preparing and reviewing the teacher's lesson plans so they are familiar with them.
4) The teacher is going to have to modify how S/HE does things, in that they are going to have to keep Connor close to their sight at all times, so he can watch her and watch the Educational ASL Interp. It is a coordinated effort between the two.
5) They cannot force the entire class to learn sign language. I am sure many of the parents of children in the class will be pissed off when they learn that their children will be forced to learn sign language and use it in the classroom. Not only that, but who is going to teach the kids sign language. It is not the job of the Educational ASL to teach ASL. They will have to also hire a teacher to come in and teach ASL to the students. The only responsibility of the Educational ASL is to interpret for your child.
6) Another issue comes in that, what happens when school starts up next year, there are going to be students from there moving onto Kinder at the end of this year, and new students coming in. Basically they are going to have to start him over every single year for the next two years with the socialization. Not only that, but because the kids will not be practicing the ASL over the summer (we are talking 12 weeks/3 months off), how many of them are going to retain what they learn.
7) Have they even posted the position yet? If not, when? And who are they going to bring in as a sub? Again, demand to see this person's qualifications, including educational qualifications. I believe they have to have at least some sort of teacher's license to be an Educational ASL Interp. Right now, they have 7 working days to advertise and fill the position. Do you think they are even going to be able to put together an appropriate add with all the relevant information in that short of a period of time, let alone screen and do the required background checks in the State of Ohio? Highly doubtful. It takes up to two weeks to do the criminal background checks, because they have to do fingerprints, etc. Oh, this will also have to be done for anyone they hire as a temp to fill the position, the criminal background check. IT CANNOT BE DONE. So, is he going to sit in the classroom with no one to sign for him the whole time, until it can be done?



Ok, I am off my soapbox. I just think all local districts are trying to pinch pennies in anyway they can.

I would try to work with the school for the deaf and see what they can help you with resource wise. I would also contact OCECD, and the ODE. I am sure though OCECD will probably refer you to the School for the Deaf as they will probably be your best resource.

I wonder if you can contact the Educational ASL Interp for Dayton Public, they have one, and I found her contact information on-line the other day. I think I goggled "Dayton Ohio Educational ASL Interpreters".
FWIW, I agree completely with the bolded, but that is not how most states/districts are interpreting the law. This is one big, big issue for some SN kids, and a reason a lot of the old Deaf schools are having such problems now. Some if the decline in the deaf population, sure, but some is the fact that LRE is being interpreted as "your neighborhood school." I agree that documenting each and every issue that they will need to address starting a very few weeks from now is the way to go.
post #39 of 41
This is a great website: www.wrightslaw.com

It is highly doubtful that they will be able to fill this position with a qualified person, substitute or not, in 7 days. No freaking way. Make sure you tell the school that the clock starts ticking on that day, and that you are expecting that his services will be made up in full if your little one is not able to start right away. They will have to do make-up hours of OT and Speech, too.

Also, it is completely ridiculous that he said that the rest of the class will be taught ASL. Ask who they have hired to teach this, and how it is going to be added into the curriculum.

My prediction? Your little one will be sent out of district. They are pushing you to see what they can get away with and if you cave. Don't.
post #40 of 41
Do you have any advocacy organizations? If there are advocates for the disabled in your community, they should be able to connect you with a special education advocate (NOT a parent advocate, they're useless--at least they are around here).

The points you MUST hammer on--the only ones that they are legally obligated to follow--is least restrictive environment and free and appropriate education. DON'T let the word best to enter your vocabulary--they don't have to give you 'best,' and they'll tell you this.

It is absolutely more restrictive to make his only route of communication through one person. The school district is doing a bunch of fast-talking to make it seem as if they can replicate what this other school has--they can't, and they know it. Hang in there.

You're taping the meetings, right?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Special Needs Parenting
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Special Needs Parenting › **Update** It's all falling apart...transition from EI to IEP