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Anyone here on the Makers Diet (Jordan Rubin)?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
This book and diet was recommended to me due to my diverticulosis. It looks like a really tough diet to follow. The hardest part for me would be "no wheat." Yikes. I love bread! I can't imagine living without bread.

Have any of you tried it?
post #2 of 14
I've done it two or three times. I love how I feel when I follow it, but I have gotten away from it. I found the first 4 days the hardest, and once I got past that, it was pretty easy to stick with. I don't think it would hurt your issues, and it might help. I really like that it focuses on eating as many fresh veggies and fruits as you like, there is no limit on your portions, and you can eat as much as you like, as long as you stick within the "approved list". I wasn't ever hungry on it, although it did take a few days for my body to adjust to not eating grains as fillers in my diet.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks! So, on this diet you eat no grains whatsoever? And no dairy? Ugh, the no grains is the tough part for me. I can do without white sugar/white flour and could even fathom no dairy, but no grains! It's hard to imagine. Can you have rice or rice milk on this diet?

I will probably order the book from Amazon, but I'm interested in how others have fared with this diet.

Anyone else try it?
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sahmmie View Post
Thanks! So, on this diet you eat no grains whatsoever? And no dairy? Ugh, the no grains is the tough part for me. I can do without white sugar/white flour and could even fathom no dairy, but no grains! It's hard to imagine. Can you have rice or rice milk on this diet?

I will probably order the book from Amazon, but I'm interested in how others have fared with this diet.

Anyone else try it?

It is broken into 3 2 weeks periods/phases. During the first 2 weeks, you eat no grains, no sugars (except like 1 TB of raw honey), only small fruits (think berries), no dairy except goat/sheep's milk cheeses (I think). During the second 2 weeks, you still eat no grains or sugars, you add in more fruits and veggies (sweet potatoes), and maybe raw dairy (can't remember for sure about that). During the last 3 weeks, you can add sprouted/soaked grains in small amounts, raw dairy (for sure), and pretty much any and all fruits and veggies. No rice milks at all anywhere on the plan, as Rubin is not a fan at all of processed foods.

Like I said earlier, I found the first week the hardest; not having grains or sugars was pretty hard at first. Once I got past that, it really wasn't difficult at all, and I felt very good on it. You do not have limited portion sizes, so hunger isn't an issue. You eat what you like, and how much you like.

If you are interested in his ideas, but don't think you can handle the strictness of the plan, you might read his Perfect Weight America, which is the same idea, but spread out over 12 weeks, I think. The goal is the same, but is less intense.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank you. I've ordered the book. I'll give it a try. I've been trying to eliminate all processed foods anyway, but bread is hard to give up. I make my own so I thought that was good. I'll have to see what he says about it in the book.
post #6 of 14
a lot of diet books for folks with digestive issues- ie. chrohns, diverticulitis/losis, candida, celiac disease, even autism spectrum disorders- call for quitting wheat especially, but often most, if not all grains.

the basic premise of not eating grains is this- human beings have been on earth for maybe a million years (of course if you are an ardent Christian you might believe in a literal view of the bible which says we've only been around for a few thousand). humans have only been practicing agricultural,ie. not just hunting and gatherering but farming, for 5000-10000 years. so wheat and all grains are pretty new to the human diet and humans may not have yet (or ever will be) adapted to this genetically and therefore some of us can't digest grains well and they are probably not anyone's optimal food.

for grain-free resources i would also suggest these sites and books:

http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info/

http://gapsdiet.com/

http://www.eatwellfeelwellthebook.com/

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/why-g...are-unhealthy/

http://www.paleonu.com/get-started/

http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/20...-on-wheat.html
post #7 of 14
I feel like if I focus on meat, fruits, and veggies (but honestly, meat and fruits especially) I really don't miss grains at all. I don't know if that helps at all, but sometimes shifting the focus of your diet can help-- I put energy into sourcing great, yummy meat (and I don't worry about fat content here, so if I want a steak fried in bacon fat, that's cool) and I don't really notice the lack of bread. Potatoes are still fine if you need the carbs during the transition.
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by organicmidwestmama View Post
a lot of diet books for folks with digestive issues- ie. chrohns, diverticulitis/losis, candida, celiac disease, even autism spectrum disorders- call for quitting wheat especially, but often most, if not all grains.

the basic premise of not eating grains is this- human beings have been on earth for maybe a million years (of course if you are an ardent Christian you might believe in a literal view of the bible which says we've only been around for a few thousand). humans have only been practicing agricultural,ie. not just hunting and gatherering but farming, for 5000-10000 years. so wheat and all grains are pretty new to the human diet and humans may not have yet (or ever will be) adapted to this genetically and therefore some of us can't digest grains well and they are probably not anyone's optimal food.

for grain-free resources i would also suggest these sites and books:

http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info/

http://gapsdiet.com/

http://www.eatwellfeelwellthebook.com/

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/why-g...are-unhealthy/

http://www.paleonu.com/get-started/

http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/20...-on-wheat.html
Wow! Thanks for the explanation. I hadn't thought of that but it sure makes sense. I read in Michael Pollan's book (In Defense of Food) that the reason antibiotics are given to cattle is that cows are not meant to digest grains and so when they are fed corn and other grains they develop infections in their GI tracts. I never thought about it before, but maybe this happens to humans too.

Thanks also for the websites. I will check them all out.
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueridgewoman View Post
I feel like if I focus on meat, fruits, and veggies (but honestly, meat and fruits especially) I really don't miss grains at all. I don't know if that helps at all, but sometimes shifting the focus of your diet can help-- I put energy into sourcing great, yummy meat (and I don't worry about fat content here, so if I want a steak fried in bacon fat, that's cool) and I don't really notice the lack of bread. Potatoes are still fine if you need the carbs during the transition.

I like meat as well, but unfortunately I've always loved the meat/bread combinations aka sandwiches. It will be tough for me to adapt to a no bread diet, but I know that once you avoid a certain food for a while you eventually stop craving it.

Thanks for the encouragement!
post #10 of 14
there are alternatives to bread that are decent. do they completely fill the void of a nice, crusty loaf of sourdough bread? not quite...

here are my fav. bread subs;

crisp lettuce leaves are good for roll ups with meat or especially with chicken satay and peanut/almond butter sauce.

rice if you arent totally grain-free.

almond flour or other nut flour 'breads' and crackers like elana's pantry recipes-
www.elanaspantry.com

grain-free bread recipe here- http://www.meghantelpnerblog.com/200...eadless-bread/ - it uses arrowroot and almonds, arrowroot IS a starch, but is not a grain.
post #11 of 14
http://www.chebe.com

That brand makes an AMAZING pizza crust that I make into breadsticks. They're delicious!
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks to both of you!!! I had no idea there were grain free breads!! And pizza dough is must have around here! My kids would be miserable without pizza!
post #13 of 14
I have to second gardenmommy. I've tried the Maker's Diet a few times, and the first few days are always the hardest. My head seems clearer, I have more energy, and I'm not as hungry as I thought I would be without bread. When I'm on the diet, I feel like I'm more aware of how my body reacts to the foods I eat, than when I'm just eating whatever.
post #14 of 14
Subbing since I am very interested in the Makers Diet.
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