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my doc said i have hypothyroidism - Page 2

post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoBecGo View Post
JaquelineR how would i know? My T3 is always mid-high end of normal range, like my T4 in my BT's. My TSH is now 0.78, my lowest ever level since beginning testing in 2006! I talked to my sister and her TSH also remains high (about 3) even when her T4 is so high they're reducing her doseage. Maybe it's a weirdness with our family...?
One thing to consider is just supplement selenium for a while. Do some reading on dosages, personally I think up to 400mcg is reasonable. When I started supplementing nutrients when I was hypo, I saw results in about 2 weeks--don't know how variable that timeframe may be, so take it as one datapoint.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoBecGo View Post
Hmm, thanks. Well i downloaded the excel thing and it has my TSH as sitting low (-4) but my T4 and T3 are sitting both in +2, but "optimal" is directly below them. I guess with me being pregnant it's hard to know how i'd be "normally".
Most of the data I've read is based on treatment with dessicated thyroid, but I know that Stop The Thyroid Madness says that if you get up to a higher dosage and/or blood level and are still having "thyroid" symptoms, it's highly probable that you have an adrenal problem. Of course, mainstream medical practitioners tend only to recognize adrenal problems when they've advanced to the point of say Addison's or Cushing's.
Cortisol allows thyroid hormone to penetrate the cell in order to do it's "work" so if your cortisol is low, your thyroid has to work harder in order to produce the proper effect.
Most alternative practitioners (ime) are more experienced with "lesser" forms of adrenal disorders/adrenal fatigue so I might try that route (and, in fact, have done so ).
post #23 of 31
It's overwhelming, yes indeed!! Hope you find some answers. There is LOTS of support on MDC, so you are in good hands! Here are a few articles that have helped me (from the Women to Women clinic):

A natural approach to hypothyroidism can work wonders


and
Eating to support your thyroid — simple ways to naturally preserve thyroid function

Good luck!
post #24 of 31
I'm just subbing to this thread. Thanks for the valuable info. I was just diagnosed with Hashimoto's, but since my TSH levels are only 3.87 (though I have many symptoms of hypothyrodism - irritability, sensitive to cold, depression, general lethargy, inability to lose weight though not badly overweight, and when I did breastfeed, I could never produce enough milk so I think I've been this way for years), I opted not to get on synthroid at this time. I have a slightly swollen thyroid gland due to the fact that I "caught" it early, but I realized that at least at this point, I want to try dietary changes first, so thanks for the link to the women to women link on the thyroid.

I was surprised to find out my Morton table salt in my cabinet does not contain iodine. I guess you actually have to pay attention to what salt you buy because they aren't all supplemented with iodine.
post #25 of 31
Iodized salt is useless for supplementing iodine for a thyroid problem.

Historically our milk and bread contained large amounts but modern processing replaced the iodine in bread with an iodine antagonist to make thryroid problems worse: bromides. Modern dairies no longer use iodine to disinfect equipment and cow teats... they use chemicals instead. (Yay, my Amish raw milk farm uses iodine!)

Also chlorine, fluoride, perchlorate, and soy so ubiquitous in our environment and food chain... tiny amounts of iodine face a sea of antagonists today.

Also processed salt is not at all healthy. Natural Celtic Sea Salt is much better because it has a higher chloride and mineral content and way lower in sodium... surprise, doesn't effect blood pressure like processed salt. It is rec to take 1 tsp/day. See 'THE Iodine Thread' for iodine supplement options.
post #26 of 31
I was reviewing the most excellent list of hypo symptoms at STTM.com and it's the only one that has "cold butt"!

http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic

They also do not rec Armour but instead the other natural thyroid hormones:

http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com...e-have-learned
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post
Iodized salt is useless for supplementing iodine for a thyroid problem.

Historically our milk and bread contained large amounts but modern processing replaced the iodine in bread with an iodine antagonist to make thryroid problems worse: bromides. Modern dairies no longer use iodine to disinfect equipment and cow teats... they use chemicals instead. (Yay, my Amish raw milk farm uses iodine!)

Also chlorine, fluoride, perchlorate, and soy so ubiquitous in our environment and food chain... tiny amounts of iodine face a sea of antagonists today.

Also processed salt is not at all healthy. Natural Celtic Sea Salt is much better because it has a higher chloride and mineral content and way lower in sodium... surprise, doesn't effect blood pressure like processed salt. It is rec to take 1 tsp/day. See 'THE Iodine Thread' for iodine supplement options.
good to know, I'll check out the thread. I wasn't going to use salt as a way to get iodine, i just found it interesting that there were no iodine varieties and didn't realize we had that.

I am actually looking for dried kelp but am not sure where to find it - that's supposedly one of the better sources of iodine. I know a girl who used to put dried kelp on her rice dishes (she was Chinese), but I never asked her where she got it from.

And with Hashimoto's I have to be careful with the iodine...because I found out you could overdo the iodine to and create problems too.
post #28 of 31
By 14 I was barely functional. I had a killer headache for at least 12 hours a day.
You may get worse, it depends on the cause of your hypothyroid.
The real question is why not just medicate? Its one pill a day that has virtually no side-effects. I take Synthroid and I am so much happier and healthier than when I was hypo.
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Information View Post

I am actually looking for dried kelp but am not sure where to find it - that's supposedly one of the better sources of iodine. I know a girl who used to put dried kelp on her rice dishes (she was Chinese), but I never asked her where she got it from.
Only organic, heavy metal tested kelp as some help is high in arsenic. I like this: http://www.sunfood.com/buy/1/101/Kom...anic-1446.aspx

I mix a teaspoon in tomato juice and chug it before it thickens. Can gradually work up to a tablespoon or two (over months).


Pat
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Information View Post
good to know, I'll check out the thread. I wasn't going to use salt as a way to get iodine, i just found it interesting that there were no iodine varieties and didn't realize we had that.

I am actually looking for dried kelp but am not sure where to find it - that's supposedly one of the better sources of iodine. I know a girl who used to put dried kelp on her rice dishes (she was Chinese), but I never asked her where she got it from.

And with Hashimoto's I have to be careful with the iodine...because I found out you could overdo the iodine to and create problems too.
Are you gluten free? There is evidence that gluten intolerance is one of the contributing factors.

Yes, there are other supps you should take with Hashi's, see THE Iodine Thread.

I don't agree that kelp is a good source for iodine from reading the evidence of the iodine researchers that it can be a high source of bromide, an iodine antagonist, and other metals as Pat posted.
post #31 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by pumpkin View Post
By 14 I was barely functional. I had a killer headache for at least 12 hours a day.
You may get worse, it depends on the cause of your hypothyroid.
The real question is why not just medicate? Its one pill a day that has virtually no side-effects. I take Synthroid and I am so much happier and healthier than when I was hypo.
For me, figuring out why I was hypo and fixing that was my goal. I almost filled my prescription, and if I hadn't figured out something to try at the same time I got the Rx, I would've filled it because I needed to be more functional than I was. Hypo can be a temporary condition, more a symptom than the root problem itself, though it _is_ a problem as well, and figuring out what's wrong, and how to fix it, has been a worthwhile project for me.
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