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Pagan Homeschoolers: Curriculum Thread - Page 8

post #141 of 151
Bumping this up! If anyone us interested in writing a curriculum, and needs help or wants to collaborate, contact me.
post #142 of 151

This is a great idea! I'll provide any help I can. What kind of thing(s) still need to be done?

post #143 of 151

subbing
 

post #144 of 151

Subbing.
 

post #145 of 151

Is this thread still active??  I have only seen a few posts other than those bumping and those subscribing within the last year...

 

I have 4 children, my oldest graduated this year, my second oldest is remaining in a nearby public high school, and my two youngest are homeschooled.

I would LOVE to see a reasonably priced pagan-based curriculum.  I am as eclectic in schooling format as I am in my spirituality.

I have been using Time4Learning & IXL, and approaching everything with kind of a "Waldorf" view. We learn a great deal from nature, and much of the "classic" studies can be reinforced in this way also.  I find that a mixed approach to learning works best for us, with some of that day spent on "book/computer work" and the rest spent in a hands-on basis.

 

Example:

Science - the lesson begins with a book/computer lesson that studies botany; from there we research the growth, enviroment, needs, etc of a chosen herb;

Physical Education - We go out and plant that herb, or harvest it, depending on what stage of growth it might be in at the time we are studying it.

Home Ec/Life Skills - We plan a meal that uses the herb we planted/harvested

Health - We find out the health benefits of the herb and other ingredients in the meal planned. We learn what food groups they all encompass and why it is important to get a little of each group. Perhaps even learn the medicinal uses of the herb.

Language Arts - We use the names of many herbs and plants and parts of plants for spelling/vocabulary, as well as perhaps writing up an information page for the child's personal book (book of shadows, herbal grimoire, or other type of personal book)

Social Studies - Perhaps we learn how the herb was used in the past in may different cultures

Math - Maybe we compare the costs of growing our own herbs to buying them, or calculate the amounts of items used in the recipe if it needed to be doubled or tripled

Spirituality - How does this herb fit into our spirituality? We see the divine in all things, including the plants that sustain us. We also often use herbs in our daily rituals.

 

 

The above example covers ALL the required subjects in my state (Nebraska) - Math, Science, Social Studies, Language Arts, and Health - all based off of an herb we started out studying on a website like Time4Learning or from a book.  What's more... we didn't have to pay an outrageous amount for a "cookie-cutter curriculum" that we then had to modify to make it fit us.

 

 

How do YOU homeschool?

post #146 of 151

I don't think this thread is very active, but I would love to see it more active. My six year old finally got on board with the homeschooling idea, and I tentatively have started planning. I'd love to hear what other Pagan/earth-centered mamas have planned.

post #147 of 151
We are a Pagan homeschool family.

I am working mostly with in Waldorf, which I have found very supportive to being Earth Based right up till 2nd Grade. I am Currently looking into what Stories will fill the rolls of the 'Saint' stories, as it is the message of the story that matters, not this story or that. I feel Stiner, himself provided input from his religious pov and 'universal truths'- things that hold true from religion to religion- but didn't mean for his religious pov to be the end all; I digress. I am also adding in bits and pices of other styles, but at a Waldorf speed...

I do have a Religious Ed part of our homeschool, and I fully hope my kids question it and find what they believe. I'm just sharing what I believe. I see many pagans who choose to leave their child/ern "blank slates", and I feel this will be leaving a void in an important part of childhood. A void a child/teen/adult might fill with anything from a well meaning religion to drugs or anything in between. If I teach my children to think for themselves, and the idea of being a Spirtual person they will find Their way. This is what my goal in the end.

We do go to a UU, and love them. As they allow us to have our theology, and I can find like minded people, sometimes smile.gif Also, we are looking into Spiral Scouts to see if there is a circle near us.

If anyone wants to chit chat about Pagan homeschooling feel free to hit me up!
post #148 of 151
I am super new to homeschool but I have heard that oak meadow does different stories when typical Waldorf starts saints and Enki does multicultural stories. I have an awesome feminist fairy tale book called "maiden of the north" I plan to use. Also my dad is working on righting stories that read like fairy tales to teach the kids about different healing properties of herbs "ginkgo tree helps lost kids remember their way home etc" so you could write some of your own like that.
post #149 of 151

Hello all, this is my first post on Mothering.

 

In response to Abergine68 - I loved what you have done with your wheel & it has inspired me to do something similar with my daughters this year. I plan for each of us to have our own wheel & add to it as we move through the year. 

 

I did a little bit of digging online & found this super website that has lots of inspiring photos : Partners in Place

 

I have also been working on a post on my own blog about the 'Wheel of the year' I made for my daughters several years ago, which is still going strong. You can see photos here

 

Thank you again for the inspiration!

post #150 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlyAngil View Post

I do have a Religious Ed part of our homeschool, and I fully hope my kids question it and find what they believe. I'm just sharing what I believe. I see many pagans who choose to leave their child/ern "blank slates", and I feel this will be leaving a void in an important part of childhood. A void a child/teen/adult might fill with anything from a well meaning religion to drugs or anything in between. If I teach my children to think for themselves, and the idea of being a Spirtual person they will find Their way. This is what my goal in the end.
 

 

I think this is a lovely goal. I do believe we all have a spiritual aspect to us. Nurturing that in children in a gentle, 'sharing the family culture' sort of way and teaching them to think for themselves is a good thing in my own humble opinion.

post #151 of 151

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Leslie

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