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Pagan Homeschoolers: Curriculum Thread - Page 2

post #21 of 151
Hi Aeress and all the Pagan mamas I've missed so much (I will go post in the spirituality forum, hopefully this afternoon).

I am feeling pulled towards homeschooling and yet I guess I am a little scared of the unknown...DH is worried about socialization of course but he is a pretty open guy - I'm the research one.

Anyways, having a 2.5 year old, I would LOVE information about pre-school/infant/toddler curriculum! I've been searching and doing what I can come up with.

*hugs to all*
post #22 of 151
subbing!

I already have a curriculum that I really enjoy, but I am looking to add Wheel of the Year information into our daily lives!
post #23 of 151
subbing!
Off to read & catch up!
post #24 of 151
My DH feels very strongly that science would need to be an integral part of the curriculum, and while I agree with him, how to do that while keeping the wonder of it all, e.g. the moon phases, what happens scientifically and spiritually? Any thoughts?
post #25 of 151
I'm out here too.

Not sure I would really want a religious curriculum, but obviously love incorporate some of the basic beliefs into it.

Holli
post #26 of 151
So what is the goal of a pagan curriculum?

I am personally more interested in presenting my children with information about a range of religious and spiritual beliefs than in raising them to believe what I believe. I'm not hearing anyone on this thread say anything different, though if anyone out there has a different point of view, I'd love to hear more about it.

It *is* important to me to raise my kids with a strong awareness of nature and ecology, and the spiritual and physical benefits of living "green" and being outdoors as much as possible.

From a scientific point of view, I'd say maybe that we evolved as a species on this earth and that awareness of and time spent with the rhythms and cycles of nature are essential to our well-being.

Quote:
Originally Posted by witchygrrl View Post
My DH feels very strongly that science would need to be an integral part of the curriculum, and while I agree with him, how to do that while keeping the wonder of it all, e.g. the moon phases, what happens scientifically and spiritually? Any thoughts?
I will be homeschooling my oldest for grade 7 -- first time homeschooling an older child.

I expect that we will be using a good secular science curriculum alongside some history-of-science-and-scientists material (if we need to supplement, if the main curriculum doesn't have this.)

I am personally interested in the religious/spiritual beliefs of important scientists, both past and present. And in the way religions and cultures of the present and past supported or hindered the work of science. Hope my daughter is too, and that we can link the secular science curriculum to the pagan /spiritual curriculum through this kind of study.
post #27 of 151
Thread Starter 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOLAGYmUQV0

I think the above video shows just what is being discussed. I believe science is wonderous and magical and beautiful. We use the scientific approach to explore a multitude of topics and ideas and the girls are used to mommy saying, what do you think will happen, what is your theory, hypothesis etc.



The questions was "what is the purpose?"
I think for some families, pulling together a curriculum can be very daunting- so they look for a boxed curriculum and for various reasons, being it too academic, religious etc- they decide that the curriculum doesn't work.( For me, I love pulling things together and creating a unique program that works for each individual child. It is almost a hobby)
So, a pagan curriculum that was boxed together, would be beneficial. FOr the purpose of this discussion, I don't think it would be feasible to do a "boxed" curriculum but we could compile all of the elements that could become a boxed curriculum.

Is this making sense? Honestly, I can't do anything today without being interrupted.
post #28 of 151
Thanks for the link, Karen!

I think you are making total sense

I'd also like to get recommendations for secular/ pagan-friendly curriculum that people are currently using, especially for non-core subjects. What is this curriculum that you love, Autumn?

What is this Curriculum of Love ?
post #29 of 151
subbing as well
post #30 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aubergine68 View Post
So what is the goal of a pagan curriculum?

I am personally more interested in presenting my children with information about a range of religious and spiritual beliefs than in raising them to believe what I believe. I'm not hearing anyone on this thread say anything different, though if anyone out there has a different point of view, I'd love to hear more about it.

It *is* important to me to raise my kids with a strong awareness of nature and ecology, and the spiritual and physical benefits of living "green" and being outdoors as much as possible.

From a scientific point of view, I'd say maybe that we evolved as a species on this earth and that awareness of and time spent with the rhythms and cycles of nature are essential to our well-being.



I will be homeschooling my oldest for grade 7 -- first time homeschooling an older child.

I expect that we will be using a good secular science curriculum alongside some history-of-science-and-scientists material (if we need to supplement, if the main curriculum doesn't have this.)

I am personally interested in the religious/spiritual beliefs of important scientists, both past and present. And in the way religions and cultures of the present and past supported or hindered the work of science. Hope my daughter is too, and that we can link the secular science curriculum to the pagan /spiritual curriculum through this kind of study.
What is the goal - for me & what I see as the needs of my family/kids, its a blend of spirtual, and the scientific to help round out what my kids will be reciving in their PS education. The ideas of the phases of the moon, and rhythms of the day/night for me help to connect me & the kids to the earth and how we are apart of it and how we have to be mindful of our actions with her.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Aeress View Post
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOLAGYmUQV0

I think the above video shows just what is being discussed. I believe science is wonderous and magical and beautiful. We use the scientific approach to explore a multitude of topics and ideas and the girls are used to mommy saying, what do you think will happen, what is your theory, hypothesis etc.



The questions was "what is the purpose?"
I think for some families, pulling together a curriculum can be very daunting- so they look for a boxed curriculum and for various reasons, being it too academic, religious etc- they decide that the curriculum doesn't work.( For me, I love pulling things together and creating a unique program that works for each individual child. It is almost a hobby)
So, a pagan curriculum that was boxed together, would be beneficial. FOr the purpose of this discussion, I don't think it would be feasible to do a "boxed" curriculum but we could compile all of the elements that could become a boxed curriculum.

Is this making sense? Honestly, I can't do anything today without being interrupted.
that video, I'm going to bookmark it at home so I can have the kiddos watch it.
You are making sense - like I said above, mine intent is supplement and round out the general education my kiddos are getting in PS, but to continue to foster their wonder and curiousity (sp?) in the world. Someone mentioned the wheel of the year idea or seasonal based all of which I would be in favor of as that's when typically questions come up and then I'm struggling to address them for my kids quickly or locking myself away with the computer googling until I find something acceptable. If all the elements of a curriculum were available and it was one i liked - that is a win/win for us.
post #31 of 151
When my son was younger we took classes that were taught by a "fairy". She was great at incorporating all things about nature into a preschool environment. I think I loved the classes as much as my son did. Now we do a basic online curriculum that does not have any religious content to it. We talk about the sabbats as they come up. We also go to Spiral Scouts where there is a lot more discussion of the sabbats. The group leader is really good about explaining things to little ones. (Our group has a lot of 3 and 4 year olds in it.) My son also gets a lot of exposure to a variety of religions in every day life. I am Wiccan. My husband practices an earth based Native American type spirituality. My inlaws are Catholic. And my SIL and her family are Jewish. It makes for interesting family get togethers.

Kathi
post #32 of 151
secular / non pagan / preschool : I LOVE littleacornlearning.com ! fantastic! non religion based but totally based on the cycle of the year. I also love waldorf for the teaching of many world religions through their myths and stories.

religion in homeschooling for me I want something to help replace what we have lost by non longer growing up in family communities. before there was no need to Teach religion unless you were going to become a priest/ess because it was just the way it was. You just did it with your community.. like christmas... no one really needs to be taught about christmas because it's just part of life. I'm starting a spiral scouts group in my area that I home will do some of this as well as provide a sort of homeschool co-op .
post #33 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aeress View Post
So, a pagan curriculum that was boxed together, would be beneficial. FOr the purpose of this discussion, I don't think it would be feasible to do a "boxed" curriculum but we could compile all of the elements that could become a boxed curriculum.

Is this making sense? Honestly, I can't do anything today without being interrupted.
subbing!
For me, I love this idea. While I'm not Pagan, a lot of the beliefs and practices sort of line up with our own beliefs, plus I do choose my curric in bits and pieces. Being able to sort of look at a complied list of resources-- like a sort of do-it-yourself-boxed-curriculum-- would be really helpful!

And I really like the idea of sharing some of the hand-made things like the Wheel of Year calender! I am very interested in that and love the idea of the kids creating it themselves.

ETA: Also, wow. I just looked up Spiral Scouts and am very interested! And it looks like there might be some active groups a little closer to Chicago. Very cool.
post #34 of 151
post #35 of 151
love this thread I do like the idea of calling it more earth based or wheel of the year curriculm


subbing
post #36 of 151
Thread Starter 
Keep sharing ideas and conversing- I will be away for a day or so- but will be back soon.
post #37 of 151
subbing!

We will be using a blend of Calvert and Global Village School with dd1 this year (5yo, 1st grade). Calvert for the state standards and Global Village for the earth/justice aspect. I've got gobs of notes and folders filled with the basics of a pagan friendly literature based pK-5 currric. But with three mini munchkins I want (ok, need) a more formal "school in a box" this year otherwise I will lose focus! But getting my curric shiny and on the market is a goal that will be going on my treasure map this year.

In terms of language, the Global Village blurb uses
Quote:
emphasis on peace, justice, diversity and sustainability
.
post #38 of 151
Quote:
So what is the goal of a pagan curriculum?
For me, the goal is... hmmm.... there was a recent discussion about how christian terminology and world view is assumed to be the norm. Regardless of a person's individual affiliation, it is assumed that certain phrases/gestures/dates will be understood in a specific manner. Speaking as an anthropologist, that sort of shared cultural history is totally normal. But I'd like to put together a curriculum that doesn't necessarily support this assumption. Not a curriculum teaches a child to "be a good pagan" (whatever that might be), but a curriculum that approaches subjects from a more open perspective in which the primacy of humanity, the maleness of the divine, the reification of gender/hierarchy, the whole "manifest destiny", etc is not assumed.

Right now I have a half dozen curric program brochures sitting on my table. And I spent the past month trying to find the right fit for our family from existing options. What stood out was the strong "christian" flavor of even the more "secular" options. Bible quotes next to math problems, devotions built into schedules, literature based programs that explain why non-christian books are "still relevant" to a christian student. Of course a parent can simply skip the devotions, leave the prayer cd in the box, ignore the bible verse in the math book, and add books that feature non-christian characters. But if you have to do all that, what's the point in getting the curric to begin with? And what about the assumptions built into these programs? A science text can be completely "secular" and still written from the assumption that human needs are primary... that the point of conservation is to maintain resources for humanity's future needs (you know, the ads that say "don't chop down the rain forests! there could be a cure for cancer in there!" instead of "don't chop down the rain forest. the trees belong to themselves, not to you.")

Tangent--anyone read the short story The Forest is Crying (by Charles deLint )? One character (a burned out social worker) says he can't care about nature/conservation since there are so many suffering children and trees don't cry... and the other character (once a child saved by this social worker) replies that maybe he just can't hear them?
Quote:
"There's a big difference between some trees getting cut down and a kid dying." /skip/ "from our persective, sure, but maybe not from a global view. We have to remember that everything's connected. The real world's not something that can be dividied into convenient little compartments, like we'll label this, 'the child abuse problem,' this'll go under 'depletion of the ozone layer.'"
.- I'm a big fan of de Lint, and his worldview has had a real influence on me... I totally recommend his writing to people of all paths, but pagans I think may find some interesting/thought provoking/challenging ideas.--

Sorry, I'm rambling. I'm making dinner and the kiddos are going nuts while I bounce between stove/computer/play mat. Hopefully this made some sense since I don't have time to edit for clarity! More later....
post #39 of 151
i would love a boxed curriculum that was earth based. I have really liked waldorf for this live ed / christopherus / oak meadow it has its christan bits which are also part of our shared cultural norm but also dives into egypt / greek / ireland / etc etc and is very seasonal based.

what i don't want is a pagan curriculum that is just normal with seemenly random 'pagan' bits thrown in YKWIM? like why are the bible quotes next to the math problem? how does that relate? Why just throw in random detached pagan-y things in?
post #40 of 151
Thread Starter 
As I sat at our UU church, I kept going back to how to do this, how to make a pagan homeschool curriculum that meets the needs of the child and parent- how to incorporate earth based traditions with being authentic and meaningful for the child.

I didn't get a clear answer.

It is far easier for me to put together an infant toddler curriculum because it is more open ended.

I like the idea of having one place to go to to gather ideas, find curicculum, materials etc. It would be so helpful for me to have a website dedicated to pagan homeschoolers....
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