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Pagan Homeschoolers: Curriculum Thread - Page 5

post #81 of 151
Quote:
i have found many pagans distainful of wiccans in general,
Interesting! It's certainly not what I'd expect from the sorts of books available at most mainstream bookstores. Maybe it's a sort of....hmmmm... secondary rebellion? Because wicca is easy to find, it's the point of entry for many, but as a person explores they discover they relate better with a different path and feel like they have to explicitly declare against wicca?

Or maybe it's due to those loaded bookshelves... although some have great info, it can be hard to take some of the cover art seriously. So perhaps someone compares their own beliefs with the cover art image and keeps walking?
post #82 of 151
hmmm, interesting. clay, do you feel "circle round" is wiccan in focus? (i love celebrating the great mother, BTW)

BTW, when i joined my old coven, there were very few books on wicca or witchcraft. drawing down the moon, spiral dance, dreaming the dark, a few cunningham books, etc.

besides, i don't feel you can grasp the essence of any religion or spiritual path in a book. it can start you off on your path, but it can't take you very far... IMO.
post #83 of 151
Given the authors, Circle Round is very "Reclaiming" IMO. So not "wiccan" but still more "specific to a tradition" than other books? It's a great book, but I find myself turning to Celebrate more often for ideas and to Circle for specifics.

Celebrate is to wombatClay's future pagan curric as Circle is to existing pagan curric maybe?

Or at least, I wish my future curric would be as good as either Celebrate or Circle!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My local B&N has 6 or 7 full SHELVES of wicca 101 books. The cover art ranges from the "scantily clad, well endowed fantasy female" style to the "gothic font" style to the "standing stone or mossy tree" style. Almost all refer to wicca 101 or wicca for beginners or the only wiccan spellbook you'll ever need! and so on. Out of curiosity I just plugged wicca into amazon and got 3,348 titles!

If you search pagan children in amazon almost every book (75 hits but many of those are not for pagan children but rather about these topics) is specifically wiccan and the comments often complain that even books that may not have wicca in the title are still intended for a duotheistic audience. Interestingly, the Asatru collection (for children of the folk) is from lulu, meaning it is "self published".

Of course, here I am trying to add to that pile of pagan related "stuff"! But at least if I produce it myself I'll be able to control the cover art. Right?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
That actually raises a good point in terms of curriculum planning... some of the comments talk about how pagan books for children should have lots of pictures. How important is it to you to have school materials that have nice pictures? Thinking about what is on our shelves right now, I do have lots of "image heavy" books (like Eyewitness or Ask Me Why) but I'm not sure if that will continue as the kiddos get older. As a child I loved many books that had few (or no) illustrations. And being able to envision something is an important pagan skill ime.

How do you plan on teaching those "vision skills"? Or are you going to leave more specifically "magical" skills until later and just encourage the amazing abilities innate in children?
post #84 of 151
I've been thinking a lot about homeschooling lately and wanted to share some resources. I decided to concentrate on Joy. My search of "teaching" joy has come up with a whole slew of wonderful things.

Peggy Jenkins has a book called The Joyful Child which half of it can be found at the link on Google Books. She also wrote a book called Nurturing Spirituality in Children which is of interest as well. Her website is here and has some lovely ezines in there. One more Peggy Jenkins resource is an article on Soul Based Parenting which is not homeschooling but definitely related.

Soul Based Education is a great article which reviews many resources. Not all the links at the end of the article work but with some googling you can drum up the info.

One more resource for everyone is Suggested Books for pagan homeschoolers.

I got mad at Waldorf (LOL) due to some people's thoughts on Grimm is the master of all fairy tale books. There is so much beautiful tales in life that why focus and limit yourself to Grimm? This lead me down the joy path. I'm not following anyone's lead. I'm on the path myself and intend to take my children with me. My kids are young and this is not the age to teach but to live.

In the mean time: I actually did choose a Grim Fairy Tale for the fairy tale of the month. 3 Billy Goats Gruff. DD strongly dislikes it though and completely changed it. The troll is a nice troll and invites everyone over the bridge and they all end up great friends who play together.
post #85 of 151
Awwww.... that's sweet!
post #86 of 151
I'm very excited to see this thread!
I've been checking out the Enki resources and have been happy with the huge amounts of nature based songs and stories.
post #87 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by AKfamily View Post
I'm very excited to see this thread!
I've been checking out the Enki resources and have been happy with the huge amounts of nature based songs and stories.
Enki intrigues me. I'd love to magically get a hold of a free copy. I'm a little off put by not only the cost but also the fact that you aren't supposed to resell. I know mamas do resell all the time though. As much as I "want" Enki it is a want. We don't have a lot of money and even if I did have $500 I probably could come up with a whole bunch of other things to buy instead - like an apple cider and wine press. (Which should be coming any day now )

I am thinking of paying the money for the K story book. I do like that it's natured based. One of the songs they have a sample of is quite beautiful and stirring and makes me want the Community and Festival song book as well.

Am I the only person who has a long list of homeschooling "wants?"
post #88 of 151
Thread Starter 
What do people think about books that are nature based but not written by a pagan? For instance, I find so many magical aspects in books that are very mainstream. Even a simple book, like Animal Homes by Eric Carle was magical to me, as I read it to dd. I didn't say it was magic, but we did talk about respecting animal habitats, and how animals have great gifts that we should respect. (Like how a bird builds a nest)

I know calling it "Pagan" might be problematic but what about Earth Based?
Personally, for me, this works but I am very eclectic.

Thoughts?

Beezer- I am off to church in a bit, we attend a UU, but I will look at the resources you listed later today.
post #89 of 151
There are some nice projects here.

I think "earth based" or "nature based" is fine. I just wish there was a word or term that was even more inclusive! I mean, nature/earth/gaia is one aspect of paganism but not the whole shebang. Though a respect for nature may be the closest thing to a "common thread".

Oh! I think I've come up with a symbolic framework that will allow the seasonal aspect to shift as needed! I had a dream 2-3 weeks ago and the next morning an opportunity I'd passed by last year suddenly popped up again... the dream and the opportunity were both related to spinning/weaving. and then it dawned on me that I could use spinning and weaving as the overall organizational framework and have the seasonal activities be more independent. It means providing 4 "sets" of seasonal crafts for each curric point so that the underlying skills can still build on each other, but it would allow families to customize for their climate without any extra work.

It makes more sense in my head but I think it'll be a good framework.
post #90 of 151
Aeress - To me there is so much beauty in life I would hate to shun something just because a label has been attached to it. I also would hate to embrace something that doesn't work for me just because a label has been attached. For instance - Eric Carle is not pagan but is beautiful. Grimm's doesn't work for us (right now) but is Waldorf. I really think taking what works for you and your family and running with it is what is best.

Wombatclay - I like the spinning/weaving of the seasons idea. Feb/early March was amazingly warm, dry, and beautifully sunny that I couldn't help but call it spring. Now we have near freezing temps, hail, and crazy weather and it's April. Go figure.

FYI - Nurturing Spirituality in Childrencan be perused on Google Books as well. There are some great activities in there imo on teaching children about Spirit (Creator, Great Spirit, or whatever name a person chooses). I think they are a bit old for my children now but am putting the book on my very long wish list of resources. If I'm not careful Google Books could be very dangerous to my pocketbook.
post #91 of 151
i love that the cover of that book is kids playing out in nature.
post #92 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aeress View Post
I know calling it "Pagan" might be problematic but what about Earth Based?
Personally, for me, this works but I am very eclectic.

Thoughts?
My thoughts - I would strongly consider an earth-based/multicultural/season-oriented curriculum. I would not be likely to choose something that had one particular brand of paganism woven through the whole curriculum, focused solely on pagan authors/resources to the exclusion of all else, or explicitly taught about magic, faeries, etc. as fact.

Kinda like I'd consider using a Christian curriculum, as long as they weren't teaching strict Biblical history or creationism instead of evolution or having Bible verses after every math problem.

Then again, I don't really identify as Pagan But it seems to me, with the diversity of Pagan beliefs, it would make sense to appeal to the largest audience rather than once specific niche, and something more diverse is likely to have wider appeal.
post #93 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by beezer75 View Post
Enki intrigues me. I'd love to magically get a hold of a free copy. I'm a little off put by not only the cost but also the fact that you aren't supposed to resell. I know mamas do resell all the time though. As much as I "want" Enki it is a want. We don't have a lot of money and even if I did have $500 I probably could come up with a whole bunch of other things to buy instead - like an apple cider and wine press. (Which should be coming any day now )

I am thinking of paying the money for the K story book. I do like that it's natured based. One of the songs they have a sample of is quite beautiful and stirring and makes me want the Community and Festival song book as well.
I lucked out and came into a copy of the K curriculum and CDs etc.
I LOVE the songs - DS sings them all the time, which brings great joy to DH and myself! It is by far the best source of quality earth-based songs that I have found.

Re the name of a curriculum, I would be very likely to purchase something that was earth or nature based spirituality labeled, less so if it was specifically pagan - though I'd be happy to find anything even close! I also think folks who are more secular but wanting to instill love for the earth would be turned off by the term pagan but interested by earth-based.
post #94 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by wombatclay View Post
What I'd like to offer is a more "generally" pagan curriculum... so using terms like vernal equinox or winter solstice instead of ostara or yule (since one is a universal/natural/planetary event while the other is a socio-culturally constructed event that doesn't apply to all pagans). Or starting a study of "american history" with, say, the planet itself and the break up of pangaea/laurasia and then following the progress through the "eyes" of a tree or a squirrel instead of the "eyes" of humanoids crossing the land bridge, or landing in viking long boats, or eventually showing up with columbus or the folks at plymouth. So not really "teaching pagan theology/technique" but instead teaching the various academic subjects from a pagan worldview.
I really like your idea, wombatclay. I know there is Goddess Moon Circles (?) Academy but I don't know much about them. I know my dh would probably laugh if he saw me ordering the kids curriculum from them (he's atheist). But I'm pagan and the kids are pagan/agnostic/atheist and very into nature and mythology and such. I would love a more neutral pagan/earth-spirituality source. Right now we are Waldorfy CM-y almost unschoolers and it's hard to find sources that aren't either "there is no god/goddess" or "the bible is always right".

We have Circle Round and Celebrating which are great. Also, the Earth School guides are great. The author is pagan (last I saw on here) and they are pagan-friendly guides, but I would love something for a bit older kids. Especially since we don't know any other pagans around here for them to be exposed to. Enki is also good, but right now only up to Grade 2 and very expensive and hard to buy (no reselling, must own previous guides...).

I know you said somewhere on here you were planning on using the Global Village School thing. Is it pagan friendly or earth-centered at all?
post #95 of 151
Subbing ; )
post #96 of 151
cant really post but \quick note

if you search Goddess Moon Circle Academy you will find there are lots of iffy issues wuth them
post #97 of 151
yeah, the first one being that they state on their website that the west coast is 3 hours *later* than the east coast. eh? and you're gonna sell me curricula?
post #98 of 151
need some ideas of an activity the kids can do at summer solstice specifically to honor their dads.

our kids go from 3-8.


thanks!
post #99 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by umami_mommy View Post
yeah, the first one being that they state on their website that the west coast is 3 hours *earlier* than the east coast. eh? and you're gonna sell me curricula?
Actually the west coast is three hours earlier than the east coast. If it is noon here, it is 9:00am there.

I'd still be worried about their curriculum though. I have yet to hear anything good about them. Mostly just people who have lost money.

Kathi
post #100 of 151
yeah, i got that mixed up.... hee hee hee

whatever i read, it was wrong... i think it said the east coast was earlier! being right brained is so much like having your head in a blender sometimes!!
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