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Differences in attractiveness of children?

post #1 of 50
Thread Starter 
I'm not sure where to put this so mods you can move if you have to.

I'm having a little anxiety over something that might never be an issue, but I'm worried nonetheless. I'm also going to try to word this properly so bear with me.

DS is 2.5 and he's reallly over the top beautiful. He models and books a ton of jobs and already has a nice hunk of change saved up for himself. Everywhere he goes people comment on his looks and to top it off, he's also a very kind sweet agreeable child. We got lucky I guess.

Well I'm pregnant with a daughter and she's due in a few months.

Here's my fear: if she's not as beautiful as her brother, how will this affect her? And here's the reason for my fears...I've seen it. I've seen families fuss and fuss over the "beautiful" kid and never give the same attention to the other one. Or I"ve seen strangers come up and comment and fuss over the beautiful one and not even cast a glance at the other child. It hurts the other one SO CLEARLY and yet nobody notices. (FYI-I'm more concerned about extended family and friends and starngers, not us...we'll love them both and fuss over them equally of course, ) Heck, DH's own family does it to his neice. One of DH's neices is stop-traffic beautiful. The other neice is perfectly lovely, but yes, to be honest her sister is simply stunning. EVERYONE talks openly about how beautiful neice #2 is IN FRONT OF #1. It's been going on as long as I've known DH- 10 years. I can think of at least 4 other families throughout my lifetime that had the same thing going on.

Personally, I don't like to focus on looks. I've struggled in the past with ED's and looks are not something I want either child to think much of. (The modeling will come to a stop when DS is old enough to understand what it can mean socially if you know what I mean, right now all he thinks is YAY we get to go to the city and take pictures)

So I guess I'm looking for advice. How do I handle it if there is a difference in my two children? How to I encourage others not to make comments or draw distinctions. If strangers do, how do I handle it? Has anyone BTDT?

Thanks and sorry this is so long and all over the place...
post #2 of 50
I wouldn't focus on looks for either. And what you do in your house is a bigger deal than what other people do, but I'd try to minimize that as much as you can.

Here's my story. I was a funny looking kid but an attractive teenager. My sister was a ridiculously beautiful child, but an unattractive teenager. She was hurt much more than I was. My looks were never important to me, but it was much harder for her because she'd wrapped up her whole sense of self-worth in her looks. So be careful with your ds too.
post #3 of 50
I used to work for this math institute that held a program for profoundly mathematically gifted kids every year. One year, we had a reporter come in to do a feature on one kid (he'd been nominated for a scholarship or fellowship or something, I forget what). The reporter mentioned to me that this one kid was really exceptional, and I answered "we think all of these kids are exceptional." I think my tone was pretty casual, it wasn't a big deal to me, but all of a sudden, I have this reporter falling all over himself to apologize and explain and whatever. The result of this experience is that if someone compliments one of my kids while I'm out in public, my answer is going to fall along the lines of "I'm lucky to have two gorgeous children," or "all of my kids are lovely." I'd probably try the same line on family if there was a need. If you want to be sure not to offend people, smile besottedly while you say it - but lots of moms find that hard to avoid.

You say that your son is over the top gorgeous, and also sweet and agreeable. There are a bazillion beautiful children in the world, they can and do hire the ones who are easy to work with for modeling jobs. So it might help you to get the focus off of looks if you keep in mind that even the thing that's hypothetically all about looks is strongly related to personality and behavior.
post #4 of 50
I was a really cute baby but peaked at about 5 and it was all down hill from there. HA. (Mostly kidding.)

I wouldn't make an issue where there isn't one. ((hug))
post #5 of 50

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Edited by GoestoShow - 1/11/11 at 10:51am
post #6 of 50
I would agree that what you do at home has more of an effect than strangers, but the strangers could still cause a stir. I agree with a PP, if others only comment ds, them add that BOTH your children are adorable, they should get the hint..
I've sort of btdt... I nannied two kids That were 22 mo apart. The older girl was awkward looking wore 'coke bottle' glasses and had sever allergies that made her always have to eat differently. The younger boys was adorable!!! Complete strangers would stop, compliment the boy, and then just look at the girl they were still young when I stopped working for them (5 and 3) so I don't know how they 'turned out', but I always tried to make the older girl feel special in all of her interests... I don't remember exactly how I handles the strangers' comments.... I was young and probably could have done a better job at deflecting, but I don't recall..
Anyway, I also agree with PP, looks change- and really fast in kids- focus on innr beauty!!!!!!
post #7 of 50
its not just comparisons about looks. there is the whole thing about personality too. the outgoing gregrarious personality is good and the shy is bad.

this is what i have brought up my dd to believe. she is who SHE decides she is. others will say things, but they are THEIR opinions. it has nothing to do with who she thinks she is. so some may like it, some may not.

my brother was drop dead gorgeous. i am a plane jane compared to him. yet everyone liked my personality compared to my brother. so while he got the wow handsome comment, i got the wow she is such a happy social child comment.

my dd is 'chubby'. like her dad she carries baby fat on her. she is very active so i know its not a diet or medical issue. however sometimes she gets teased in school by teh super thin kids. and she handles it on her own without getting feelings hurt. she is who SHE is, not what others say who she is.

no matter waht the world says, it all depends on you. what the parents do is KEY!!!!
post #8 of 50
Obviously, we can only control what we can control.

We can't control what others say and do, but we can control how we respond. You can respond to comments with something that includes both your children, like "Thank you. Our children are beautiful inside and out!".

If you celebrate each child for who they are, they will have a good chance of growing up feeling good about who they are. Don't worry about the differences, and don't borrow trouble

Signed: Late Bloomer
post #9 of 50
I modeled and acted as a child. Yes, the money is nice, but it's anxiety-provoking for a child, actually.

So if you really don't want the world focused on your children's looks, I'd suggest getting your son out of modeling.
post #10 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by A&A View Post
I modeled and acted as a child. Yes, the money is nice, but it's anxiety-provoking for a child, actually.

So if you really don't want the world focused on your children's looks, I'd suggest getting your son out of modeling.


I agree 100 percent here... Even when you stop Op your other child will know about the first's modeling days. Putting a child in activities like that places importance on their looks.
post #11 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by A&A View Post
So if you really don't want the world focused on your children's looks, I'd suggest getting your son out of modeling.
agreed.
post #12 of 50
It's not quite as bad for a sister/brother as it is for a sister/sister. (no experience for brother/brother.)

The comments from others start in about fourth-ish grade with the "Oh, Mark is your brother? He's sooo cute". But, when it's a little sister, it usually works out in her favor. My brother was very good looking and popular growing up, so I had a lot of fun hanging out with him in high school. I wouldn't have traded that for anything in the world. He's 50 years old and I still get comments on my facebook about how he's still hot. I'm happy for him.

I grew up with a lot of friends with sisters. The "Your sister is so pretty" comments really hurt when the notsopretty sister is in their pre-teens. Nobody means to make hurtful comments, but it still hurts. One of my best friends has three daughters. One is breathtakingly beautiful, the other two are average looking at best. Nobody focuses on the middle child's looks, but the oldest daughter notices the differences. It bothers her so much. She's great about it, but it still hurts her. All girls go through that "I wish I had longer eyelashes" Or "I wish I could tan like that girl".

The hard truth is, people say things. Not to be hurtful, but they say things before they think it through. People Do judge on looks. It's human nature. Teenage girls will be friends with the younger sister, just to hang out near the older brother and his friends. It's just how it works.
post #13 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
agreed.
Agree also
post #14 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by A&A View Post
So if you really don't want the world focused on your children's looks, I'd suggest getting your son out of modeling.
post #15 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by A&A View Post

So if you really don't want the world focused on your children's looks, I'd suggest getting your son out of modeling.
Agree. I'm pretty puzzled by this thread, to be honest.
post #16 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by D_McG View Post
Agree. I'm pretty puzzled by this thread, to be honest.

I'm not puzzled by it. I think we all have thougths and worries that other people might not understand. I know when i was pregnant, I thought about how my child would look. I couldn't stop thinking about it.

I even felt jealous of other kids who's hair was longer or thicker. Once, I bought a book about how to do a little girl's hair... even though my little girl didn't have any hair.
post #17 of 50
I agree with all of the agree-ers. If you don't want an issue around looks, do not focus your first child's activities on looks in a formal manner like modelling, and cultivate other aspects of who they are that aren't based in something they cannot change or work towards. Simple. Your household and your views on your child are what directly impacts them the most. You can't change the views of anyone else.

TBH, your child modeling is an aspect of YOUR issues/needs/goals/etc., not his. He did not declare himself 'over the top beautiful', get head shots, call the agent and drive himself to shoots. It really speaks to YOUR value system.

You can't really have it both ways...going over the top with descriptions of your child's beauty, then worrying about other people judging #2 for lack of beauty in relation to #1.
post #18 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by nextcommercial View Post
I'm not puzzled by it. I think we all have thougths and worries that other people might not understand. I know when i was pregnant, I thought about how my child would look. I couldn't stop thinking about it.

I even felt jealous of other kids who's hair was longer or thicker. Once, I bought a book about how to do a little girl's hair... even though my little girl didn't have any hair.
No, I get that. I don't get someone who wants to de-emphasize the importance of physical attractiveness having their kid in modeling....
post #19 of 50
hmmm...not sure how much bearing this has, but it's really not about looks.

When I look back on my teens, I was...stunning. I had absolutely no idea until I was 30, and saw an old pic of a group of us, and asked my cousin who the gorgeous brunette was, and she cracked up. I was a serious looker, and I had no clue (and, yes, looking back, people told me, but I didn't believe them, and never felt like one of the "beautiful people").

My sister was, imo, very pretty. But, she wasn't as cute, in a physical way, as I was when we were babies/very young children, and probably not as stunning as a teen/young woman. I was just a really, really gorgeous baby. She was a regular, cute, cuddly baby. (She had a much cuter personality, though...she was a huge cuddler. Actually, now that I think about it, dd1 and dd2 are very similar. DD2 is immensely cute, but dd1 was beautiful, in a way babies usually aren't.)

My sister hated it. She hated that people loved my smile. She hated that I had bigger boobs than her. She hated that I had "perfect" cheekbones.

I hated it, too. I hated that people would say I had a beautiful smile or perfect cheekbones, but it was my sister who had total strangers walk up to her with a rose, or ask her for a date, or whatever. I may have been "the beautiful one"...but she was the one who got the attention! Maybe not as kids, but definitely as teens. I was gorgeous. She was outgoing, vivacious and a total man magnet. *sigh*

I have no idea if any of that helps. But, I really think the key is to play to each child's strengths - skills, abilities, personality traits (especially personality traits!) - and not worry to much about looks within your own family.

And...that actually hurt to re-read. I sound like such a braggart. I swear, I'm really not. I never felt like I was pretty at all back then (and don't think I'm pretty now, either - I think I was pretty). My sister is way prettier than I am now. She also gets way more attention than I do, but it doesn't bother me, anymore. I have dh, and a few good friends, and that's all I really need, yk?
post #20 of 50
I think it's a fair question. I'm frankly concerned about with LO #2 due Monday and DS being an EXTREMELY cute and personable child. He gets comments all the time, and I have this anxiety that LO #2 is going to somehow be second fiddle if he/she is less attractive/less smart/less personable/less whatever. I think it's natural to worry a bit.

HOWEVER...I agree that how YOU handle it will have a big impact. Make it a point to NOT focus on that aspect of your children. And don't try to compare them anyway; each child is such an individual it's not worth the anxiety trying to figure it out.

I also agree with the PPs who suggested taking your DS out of modeling. It may have been fine up to now, but maybe it's time to call it off and get DS into some less looks-oriented activities. (And as another PP said, remember that personality has a LOT to do with modeling/acting bookings as well...they won't take kids who are difficult to work with no matter how stunning.) Not judging you here, but we specifically did NOT put DS into modeling stuff because we looked into it and decided there was too much nasty stuff there...the emphasis on looks being only part of it.

Anyway, I think you will find your new DD will be as much a joy as your DS. Try not to worry. Enjoy.
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