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p.o.'d and need to vent... - Page 4

post #61 of 72
Marsupialmom, My post was not directed specifically to you. I was responding to the overall feel of this thread, which is that something might be wrong with this child. I understand you come from a BTDT point of view, and I always find it useful to read about another mom's experience. Some children do have issues and need intervention, but sometimes we jump to conclusions with very young children.

I just wanted to post to you because I don't want you feeling like I was picking on you specifically. I'm sorry if I came across that way. Your input is always valuable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marsupialmom View Post
Were did I say this child has this. Does this child's issues make me go humm...YES. It comes from a BTDT point of view.

These words were brought up because of my son's issues.

And, I don't always believe parents know, notice, and sadly from my experience some might also live in a world of denial.

I have a HOH. I once met a little girl that a 5 she was just getting diagnose as PROFOUNDLY deaf. The parents didn't want to listen. After she was diagnosed they started hearing stories from people that didn't want to say things. They also got the "I told you,so"

My friend that I suggested a hearing test and she got upset. He son was doing something my HOH child did. He didn't have a hearing issue but the ENT diagnosed a skelton muscle disorder. Until, I had pointed it out did she realize the extent of his unique behavior. I don't remember the name of the disorder but early diagnoses meant the difference between physical therapy and invasive surgeries because it is often diagnosed later.

Lastly, I am a mom that didn't know. My son was advanced in a lot of ways. My son has an awesome memory that almost fooled evaluators.

I don't feel I am making a mountain out of a mole hill. Just wanted mom to know, there could be issues. It could be normal development but issues also. I was hoping to make it a "Hey, did you know."
post #62 of 72
Okay, even though it probably looked like I jumped all over Marsupial Mom, I have to say that this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by momtokea View Post
She's the mother. She would know.
is not necessarily true. There are issues that parents are simply not equipped (in terms of knowledge of what's developmentally appropriate, for a start) to see or understand as issues. There are also parents who are pretty clued out. I know a little boy who was diagnosed with glue ear shortly before he turned five. His speech was almost completely unintelligible. Multiple people had told his mom that they suspected he had hearing issues. She simply didn't believe it, and insisted he just had a terrible temper. The temper improved almost instantly when the tubes were put in his ears. He had over 50% loss in one ear and over a third in the other. She just didn't see it.
post #63 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommy2maya View Post
because it is related, intrinsically. It is absolutely a fine motor/visual motor issue. Of course if you don't have a background in OT or have had a child who has received OT for just this reason, you might not know that or know that the relationship is intrinsic.
This is ridiculous. You have no idea what was going on, or why the child chose to make it larger. Reproducing something in a different size may frequently walk hand in hand with fine motor/visual issues, but that doesn't mean there can't be any other reason for it!
post #64 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
This is ridiculous. You have no idea what was going on, or why the child chose to make it larger. Reproducing something in a different size may frequently walk hand in hand with fine motor/visual issues, but that doesn't mean there can't be any other reason for it!
In your post before you mention about mom's not always knowing. You mention your friend and the HOH child.....this is the same.

We are not saying her child has issues....just that she might be aware these things COULD BE. I didn't have the scope or knowledge. Most parents don't! But, from our personal experiences and journeys we know these two things can be related.

It is more a "Hey, some kids that do ABC have other things going on. You might want to be aware. Do a little more research. And watch for other warning signs. It can also be in the range of norms for development."

I believe what mama was saying to you not that this child has an issue but the oversize reproduction, sight and motor skills are connected. She was referring to the sight and motor skill connection not this child in particular. I think a bad use of pronouns might have cause confusion.

Also think about it this way. You mention your friend with a HOH child and as you put it "She didn't see it." What if the OP child just needs glasses? Again, not saying this is true but what if he dd starts getting head aches? Can only draw large? Gets difficult? Runs into walls? Or "clumsy"? These are all symptoms of sight issues. I was not, nor mama, was trying to say that OP child has issues but those symptoms can mean something. And those things can be pieces of a puzzle.
post #65 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by craft_media_hero View Post
But back to the OP, I believe that her concern was not her daughter's grip, but how she felt they were being singled out as homeschoolers by the class's public school kindy teacher! For which you've gotten a lot of good advice, and I hope that you're able to resolve this without too much difficulty.
that!
I am not worried about my DD and how she holds a pencil or paintbrush, there isnt any problem she holds it how she feels comfortable , like i said i dont hold it the classic way either, I think I am ok no problems here.
boy this went way OT!!!!!

I was pissed about the art teacher preventing my 5 YEAR OLD from having a fun time playing and painting.... that's all! thank you all for your input... got some great advice on how to handle the art teacher.
post #66 of 72
My kids never much liked any of the hs classes I signed them up for.Art class lasted one day. Regular classes or just doing things on our own with kids visiting worked better.

Not in all cases but in some hs classes the teachers treat the kids differently.Or the class just is not taught well.Sometimes it seems like the company thinks,"Hey we have a slow time,so lets create a hs class to make some extra money."

I once went to a ice skating class that was held during what turned out to be open skate time.We had adult males in hockey gear zooming around while my 5yo clung to a wall.Not much of a *class*
post #67 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marsupialmom View Post
We are not saying her child has issues....just that she might be aware these things COULD BE. I didn't have the scope or knowledge. Most parents don't! But, from our personal experiences and journeys we know these two things can be related.

It is more a "Hey, some kids that do ABC have other things going on. You might want to be aware. Do a little more research. And watch for other warning signs. It can also be in the range of norms for development."

I believe what mama was saying to you not that this child has an issue but the oversize reproduction, sight and motor skills are connected. She was referring to the sight and motor skill connection not this child in particular. I think a bad use of pronouns might have cause confusion.

Also think about it this way. You mention your friend with a HOH child and as you put it "She didn't see it." What if the OP child just needs glasses? Again, not saying this is true but what if he dd starts getting head aches? Can only draw large? Gets difficult? Runs into walls? Or "clumsy"? These are all symptoms of sight issues. I was not, nor mama, was trying to say that OP child has issues but those symptoms can mean something. And those things can be pieces of a puzzle.
I hadn't realized you had replied to me until this popped back up (I never do thread subscription), so I'll address this one. The post I was replying to when you quote me said that they are related, intrinsically, and "It is absolutely a fine motor/visual motor issue." That is not about "it might be", or "this is a possible warning sign" or anything else. That's "this is what it was with my child, and this is what it is with your child".

And, yes - maybe it is. But, there is simply not enough information in the OP's posts to tell anyone that at all. The child doesn't hold a brush the way the teacher wants and chose to make a reproduction a different size. You could just as easily conclude that I'm colour-blind, because I wanted to an art project on blue paper, instead of pink, when I was a child.

(Also, the parent I was talking about with the HOH child didn't want to see it. This wasn't something that was only picked up on by a professional, due to subtle signs. This was a child of five, who could not say a single word clearly. His closest friend (much like an older sibling) "translated" for him, and even that child couldn't understand much of what he said. The mother had been told by almost everyone who knew him that they believed he had a hearing problem. She became nearly violent with a few of them.)
post #68 of 72
she probably was singling her out for being hs'd and imo people who think everything has to be done "the right way" or by the book aren't very creative people and shouldn't be teaching art for little kids but thats jmho . She's a public school teacher so she is teaching the way the system has told her she needs to, and she doesn't know any other way. I kind of feel sorry for her that she feels the need to make a fun creative art class so military like for a 5 yr old. Noone told beethoven he was playing the piano or composing music wrong when he couldn't hear and because he did it different did they?
post #69 of 72
oh btw my son age 6 kindy kid goes to a dod school (will be homeschooled next yr) and my oldest is homeschooled kindy too but she is 7 anyway he had a hard time with the pencil holding thing too but he wanted to do it the way he wanted so he gave the teach a hard time about it. he's strong willed, nothing wrong with him...his teacher even said that he's the smartest kid in her class which I was pretty proud about that. Hopefully that makes you feel better and like I said thats what public teachers are taught to teach about the holding the utensil right, to me it doesnt make a difference and I think its a petty thing to worry about in an art class for fun esp for a 5 yr old @@! oh and also wanted to add that he uses the pencil/utensils the "correct" way now that they pretty much made him/strongly encouraged it.
post #70 of 72
The question on my mind...

WHAT ON GOD'S GREEN AND VERDANT EARTH IS THE CORRECT WAY TO HOLD A PAINTBRUSH?

Have I been doing it wrong all these years?

*whimpers*
post #71 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokering View Post
The question on my mind...

WHAT ON GOD'S GREEN AND VERDANT EARTH IS THE CORRECT WAY TO HOLD A PAINTBRUSH?

Have I been doing it wrong all these years?
Oh, I have to hope you have - just because. I know I've held mine all sorts of ways, and I can't imagine why any one of them could be considered the right way. In fact, I dropped in on a painting class while on vacation once, and the teacher suddenly drew everyone's attention to the way I was holding mine, pointing it out as the way a real artist paints, and I was pretty surprised, because I was just fooling around with what felt fun and effective. I think our bodies have their own wisdom that needs to be played with, and I would hope 5 yr. olds would be given the freedom to do that!

Not only that, but I discovered not long ago that my penmanship is a lot better when I hold my pen very differently than the "proper" way! I've been noticing all the unique ways people hold pens, and clearly lots of people have just experimented to arrive what works best for them. - Lillian
post #72 of 72
Personally I like to avoid public school teachers for the same reason I avoid public school!
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