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Jamie Oliver's New Show? - Page 8

post #141 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessjgh1 View Post
I've been so busy I forgot!!! It's Saturday! That means I can watch the next episode on hulu!!! I've been voluntarily tv-free for so long it is funny to be excited about a show. Sorry, I am amused by this (not the show, my being giddy about a tv show).
Jessica
I forgot and missed it!

We have t.v., but the only thing I ever watch on it are DVDs, the Sci-Fi channel on Saturdays ( love cheezy B monster movies!) and rarely the news. But I am happy to watch this show! I'll mark it on my calendar next week so I don't forget.

I agree it could be anywhere in the USA. The town I grew up in in the midwest is very much like that town. People here eat just like that and the school lunches are exactly the same here, too. Awful.

I'm happy to see it on mainstream t.v. Hopefully, it will reach a lot of people.
post #142 of 247
For anyone who has trouble watching it on Friday nights, I just noticed that it re-airs on Saturday afternoons, 2pm central. Not sure if that's everywhere.
post #143 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmandasMom View Post
the flash mob was awesome! I had to download that song from itunes
I thought that was pretty neat too. My 2yo DD LOVED it. She danced around all during that scene and then demanded "gin! gin!" when the music stopped.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lucky_mia View Post
I agree that it is a bit contrived but at the same time, it has to be making some people think. I feel like what I have been trying to promote in my own household - very simply more whole foods, less junk, is finally being portrayed in popular entertainment. I really like what he is trying to do.
It's making me think. Well more like it's inspiring me to do better and bringing it to the front of my mind. The last few time I've gotten groceries I've been more aware of everything I put in my cart that was processed and put a few things back.
post #144 of 247
Quote:
It's making me think. Well more like it's inspiring me to do better and bringing it to the front of my mind. The last few time I've gotten groceries I've been more aware of everything I put in my cart that was processed and put a few things back.


yes! me too! Little things like shake n' bake, I put it back after I read the back of the box. I swear it took me almost 10 mintues to find a spaghetti sauce without stuff in it. Ended up with Ragu Light Heart Heathly No Salt added tomato and basil.
post #145 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmandasMom View Post
yes! me too! Little things like shake n' bake, I put it back after I read the back of the box. I swear it took me almost 10 mintues to find a spaghetti sauce without stuff in it. Ended up with Ragu Light Heart Heathly No Salt added tomato and basil.

And let me guess its one of the ones with the least ingredients but its one of the most expensive ones on the shelf
post #146 of 247
I actually watched the show for the first time last night (anyone in Canada who doesn't have cable, it's on ctv.ca).

It's definitely a Ryan Seacrest production. Holy crap. Dance numbers in a show about nutrition?

So - Americans, help me out with your national psychology - I can't help but think that Jamie would have an easier time of it if he stressed the fact that USDA policies and federal subsidies are playing a HUGE role in people's health, and to eat healthier requires effort against the "system"? I mean, from what we see in the media here, is seems that Americans don't take well to Big Brother acting callously in the background undermining the pursuit of life, liberty and happiness or whatever it is. Or would it be "wrong" for a Brit to come in and say things like that?

How much more difficult is it for Jamie to get his message across just because he's not American?
post #147 of 247
I think it is difficult because he didn't do a little homework beforehand. He threw himself into the fire a bit, that seems obvious to me.... He assumed since he did it in England it would be similar here, but there are some big differences. I think others might interpret that as being a bit conceited, maybe?
Yes, it would be helpful to talk about the role of the gov't regulations, but from what I can tell he knew NOTHING about them and has no idea-- just like the rest of most Americans. So he is exposing these things but he should have been aware of them beforehand.
There are also several great models of school lunch reform and people trying to get organics and local foods into school menus- as well as the work he did in the UK. You would think he should be pointing out these examples, too.

Like I said, he seems to have thrown himself into the fire. I suppose it makes the series more interesting and I wonder how well thought out his plan is or was and how (quickly) it came about ((still haven't seen episode 4)).
I'm amused and intrigued by these subtle cultural difference, btw. Some people are going to get annoyed by the 'lunch lady' and 'brother' language.

JEssica
post #148 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by caiesmommy View Post
And let me guess its one of the ones with the least ingredients but its one of the most expensive ones on the shelf
Isn't that the truth? I had that experience with my DH over jelly recently (He wanted concord grape (i.e. HCFS, no "real fruit") vs. me for fruit preserves (blueberry or blackberry) :eyeroll

spughy - I can't speak for all americans but I think many of families are in denial regarding the fact that food can kill you. If you look at some of the social dynamics - families/parents/kids overscheduled (either by choice or necessity), stressed out and working with limited budgets. This includes schools and community resources. In my mind the biggest issue is trying to change society as a whole and to say kids are important and its crucial to understand garbage in (foodwise) garbage out (health problems, shorten lifespan, lack of basic skills in human function (cooking)).

Overall its a bigger problem that an TV show could even try to fix, though it is helping DH to see somethings differently... Ok now I'll get off my soap box.
post #149 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessjgh1 View Post
Yes, it would be helpful to talk about the role of the gov't regulations, but from what I can tell he knew NOTHING about them and has no idea-- just like the rest of most Americans. So he is exposing these things but he should have been aware of them beforehand.

He could be like many Americans who actually think the USDA and FDA has our best interests at heart. It wasn't until he got here and saw how those organizations were involved that he realized they are doing more harm than good. If most of America doesn't realize the sad facts about the USDA and FDA then I can't fault a Brit for not knowing it.
post #150 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsMike View Post
He could be like many Americans who actually think the USDA and FDA has our best interests at heart. It wasn't until he got here and saw how those organizations were involved that he realized they are doing more harm than good. If most of America doesn't realize the sad facts about the USDA and FDA then I can't fault a Brit for not knowing it.
I think he did do his homework and read up on the guidelines, but I think the shock is how the guidelines are being carried out in the schools. I keep thinking of the "french fries are being counted as a veg, and the "optional salad - which no one was taking" moment in the High School vs. his 5-veggie asian noodle dish (which on a side note looked YUMMY!).

Now I'm not 100% in the camp the USDA & FDA have our best interests in mind, I think they are only a part of the problem which will be harder to solve (i.e. governmental red tape) vs. making a grassroots change.
post #151 of 247
I agree the problem is def not the USDA guidelines. The guidelines actually are very sensible. The travesty is what is allowed to be fed to kids to meet those deadlines. For example the optional salad ep, the requirement for lunch at HS is 1 1/4 cup fruit or veg. That's great. Awesome. But instead of an orange (available at subsidized cost or free to US schools) and some stirfry the schools are putting out french fries. That is the travesty. Not the requirement to have 1 1/4 fruit or veg at the meal.

http://wvde.state.wv.us/policies/p4321.1.pdf

See page 5 to see the requirements. The requirements are not bad. Some might think the carbs are high (11 per week), but really there is nothing outrageous about the requirements.
post #152 of 247
It's a great show. I really enjoy it. You can find all the episodes on

http://www.hulu.com/search?query=food+revoltion&st=0
post #153 of 247
i was astounded when that "director" on this past episode said that french fries are considered a serving of vegetables and jamie's dish didnt have enough veggies in it... OMG!!!
post #154 of 247
The issue isn't that the FDA or USDA have a ulterior motive. They and each state sets guidelines and the districts work within those guidelines.

A lot of districts have all sorts of contracts and things which have a huge impact on what they serve.

Here is a menu from our district, which I found to be pretty bad. The breakfast is just appalling.

http://www.kckps.org/menus/
post #155 of 247
USDA policies are *directly* responsible for creating an agricultural surplus of corn and other grains, which are sold for less than the cost to grow them. Food processors then take advantage of the vast bulk of cheap corn, soy, wheat, and corn derivatives like HFCS, soy protein and corn oil to create value-added packaged food that meets the needs of families who require filling, cheap, fast food.

Those subsidies could be redirected into crops that don't lend themselves so well to crapification. Like, say, vegetables. Subsidies could also be redirected to ensure that families could buy fresh foods *without* several packaging & retailing middlemen. The fact that USDA subsidies go to the remaining handful of huge big-ag producers says a LOT about USDA priorities and indicates that the health and wellbeing of the American people is not one of them.

Ok, off the soapbox now. I just think the problem is that people don't realize how what the USDA says in terms of what they should eat contrasts with what the USDA does in terms of making certain kinds of food affordable.
post #156 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by abimommy View Post
Here is a menu from our district, which I found to be pretty bad. The breakfast is just appalling.

http://www.kckps.org/menus/


I thought our school menu was bad, but now that I've seen yours ours doesn't look so bad. I can't belive the breakfasts in your school system. Ours even have a vegetarian option every day.

Metro Nashville Public Schools Menu

http://mnps.org/Page65676.aspx
post #157 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by abimommy View Post
The issue isn't that the FDA or USDA have a ulterior motive. They and each state sets guidelines and the districts work within those guidelines.

A lot of districts have all sorts of contracts and things which have a huge impact on what they serve.

Here is a menu from our district, which I found to be pretty bad. The breakfast is just appalling.

http://www.kckps.org/menus/
That's unbelievable..wow

What's with the breakfasts? I just dont get how they intend to TEACH these kids when they are all on a sugar high!
post #158 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhiandmoi View Post
I agree the problem is def not the USDA guidelines. The guidelines actually are very sensible. The travesty is what is allowed to be fed to kids to meet those deadlines. For example the optional salad ep, the requirement for lunch at HS is 1 1/4 cup fruit or veg. That's great. Awesome. But instead of an orange (available at subsidized cost or free to US schools) and some stirfry the schools are putting out french fries. That is the travesty. Not the requirement to have 1 1/4 fruit or veg at the meal.

http://wvde.state.wv.us/policies/p4321.1.pdf

See page 5 to see the requirements. The requirements are not bad. Some might think the carbs are high (11 per week), but really there is nothing outrageous about the requirements.
I agree that the requirements are not that bad. We should remember there still are a lot of kids in the US who depend on school lunch as their main meal, so they should have a pretty large tray of food, IMO. Childhood health problems related to overeating may be on the rise, but there are still a lot of hungry kids out there.

This show is interesting and I keep watching, but does anyone else get frustrated that they don't really even discuss what Jamie is teaching everyone to cook? So far it looks like his goal is to get Americans to eat more pasta, and I dunno if that's what he's going for. I did notice when they made the lo mein type dish in Epi 4, there wasn't a ton of pasta in ratio to the meat and veggies, which seems like a sensible way to eat pasta, but they didn't even talk about it.

I think this show is way too much about "OMGZ fat" and not enough about the other detriments to health that can occur from eating a rotten diet. Obesity CAN suck on its own, but the skinny little kids guzzling pink milk and eating fries twice a day aren't going to be the picture of health either, even if they wear slim jeans, not huskies.
post #159 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by abimommy View Post

Here is a menu from our district, which I found to be pretty bad. The breakfast is just appalling.

http://www.kckps.org/menus/
Holy cow. Those breakfasts are BAD. And so unnecessarily so. How hard would it be to serve regular Cheerios, low-fat yogurt or chicken sausage, and fruit for breakfast instead of Cap'n Crunch, Trix Yogurt, sausage biscuits (I can only imagine), and Poptarts? I mean, whose bright idea is it to get the kids all hopped up on sugar and then send them to class?
post #160 of 247
Abimommy, WTH is a Bosco Stick? Or don't I want to know?
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