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Compact fluorescents vs. regular lightbulbs - Page 2

post #21 of 28
An energy bill passed by Congress bans the incandescent light bulb by 2014!

Here is some info and you can google more.....

http://www.wnd.com/?pageId=45156
post #22 of 28
my 15yo broke one on his bed the other day. i called poison control and they told me to pick up the big pieces with gloved hands, put them in a plastic bag, use tape to pick up the smaller but still visible pieces, and put everything into several bags and toss in the trash. they said to wash his duvet cover in hot water and not worry about it.

tbh, i'm not panic-stricken, but thats bc when i was a kid, my dad broke open a thermometer so i could play with the mercury. of course now i know that may have everything to do with my fibromyalgia and other health issues, but i'm sure the amount i was exposed to is way higher than the bit of powder on ds's bed.

should i have have been more worried?
post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by blessedwithboys View Post
my 15yo broke one on his bed the other day. i called poison control and they told me to pick up the big pieces with gloved hands, put them in a plastic bag, use tape to pick up the smaller but still visible pieces, and put everything into several bags and toss in the trash. they said to wash his duvet cover in hot water and not worry about it.

tbh, i'm not panic-stricken, but thats bc when i was a kid, my dad broke open a thermometer so i could play with the mercury. of course now i know that may have everything to do with my fibromyalgia and other health issues, but i'm sure the amount i was exposed to is way higher than the bit of powder on ds's bed.

should i have have been more worried?
I wouldn't recommend more worried, but I am really, really surprised you were told to throw the remains in the trash. I thought it had to be contained and brought to a hazardous waste disposal site. Maybe others know more about this than I do.
post #24 of 28
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dachshundqueen View Post
We have had poor experiences with the CFL's. We have had a number of them break and with the mercury contamination we've decided that we're done with them. Forget about the energy savings, they seem overly fragile compared to standard bulbs. We have some in our ceiling fans, but other than that, we're not using them anymore. They also give off a strange light - at least the ones from Costco do.

Liz
Yep... my hubby refuses to buy them anymore because when they break they are toxic waste. You are not even supposed to put them in the regular trash. So, they are WAY to much trouble.
post #26 of 28
Thanks for this thread! It's reminding me to buy more good ol' fashioned light bulbs next time I'm at the store!
post #27 of 28
I thought places that sold CFLs often take them back for recycling, so... Home Depot, Lowe's, Ikea... Like Best Buy will take back old batteries. If there's one of these stores closer to you than the local hazmat collection center, that might be more convenient.

Here's another link about CFL and mercury cleanup (and a reassurance that a hazmat crew is not needed...though plenty of ventilation is key): http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/cfl.asp

We just stockpile our toxic trash in a box and make it a once-a-year errand or so to get them dropped off at the right places. Speaking of toxic, my understanding was that incandescent bulbs weren't -safe-...that they contain a bit of lead. It's really about what works for your family, I think... even after the legislation is passed, do you really think incandescent bulbs will vanish from the marketplace? I think as long as there is a demand, SOMEONE will make and find a way to sell them, even if it's out of the back of a truck!

Also, a note to everyone whose light bulbs --- incandescent, LCD, or CFL --- burn out much more quickly than they are rated, it could be a wiring problem with your home (or the fixtures). Apparently, this is much more common than we would think. It may cost a bundle to have an electrician fix the problem, but it could save you years of hassle and expense if it is the issue.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overvoltage
It can be temporary or permanent. There's a few other advice pages about it out there...might be worth some Googling for those of you with issues.


We use CFLs in some areas of our home... the outdoor lighting. Hard-to-reach areas (because they do last longer for us). I actually -like- how some take a few seconds to warm up, because it's not as shocking in the dark to turn on an instiantly bright light. For the quick on-off spots (closets and hallways), we're using up our incandescents and saving up to replace those with LEDs. We don't use them often enough for them to make an impact on our monthly bill.
post #28 of 28
I like our CFLs, though they certainly don't live up to all the hype. But then again, nothing ever does, right?

While we have had a few bulbs burn out before their time, for the most part, the bulbs we bought when we switched over are still in place. In general I have found that they do last longer, though certainly not years and years and years.

I have also never had a bulb break. All our lights are overhead, we have no lamps or anything, so maybe that has something to do with it? I haven't ever had an incandesent break either. So I am not worried about breakage, it just doesn't happen often at all.

As far as disposal, I have only had to toss a few, but there are plenty of other household items that can't go in regular trash-batteries, paint etc. So, no big deal.
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