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emotional symptoms

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
How can you differentiate between typical toddler behavior(being crappy,night waking, etc) and emotional symptoms that are caused by food reactions???

You mamas seem so good at pin pointing things and I just can't tell! DD is normally a very laid back LO but the past week she's been a lot more sensitive and grumpy. She's never been one to have attitude but lately she sure is but Isn't that normal toddler behavior?
post #2 of 5
IMO the only way to find out if it's normal behavior due to growing/normal toddler frustrations/molars/etc or if it's a food allergy would be to try elimination. I think that a lot of things are considered normal and are actually reactions to food.

For example, frequent ear infections are often considered normal (to a certain extent, anyway) in kids under 5. So doctors treat the symptoms and talk about ear tubes, but how often do they test for food allergies? I know I had to bring it up with my Ped (who thankfully was receptive). So how many kids do you think with frequent ear infections actually have a food allergy? I'm guessing quite a few.

So the same probably goes with cranky and defiant behavior. If you've done what you can to prevent the situation (been consistent, made sure they're getting frequent meals and consistent rest, etc) and especially if her behavior has changed without other explaination, it really won't hurt to try. I'm probably the least informed on what to eliminate and in what order, but I'm sure that artificial coloring, sugar, and gluten will be at the top of the list. I know that my daughter's behavior improved immensely when we eliminated artificial color and refined sugar.

Good luck!
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by brandislee View Post
IMO the only way to find out if it's normal behavior due to growing/normal toddler frustrations/molars/etc or if it's a food allergy would be to try elimination. I think that a lot of things are considered normal and are actually reactions to food.

For example, frequent ear infections are often considered normal (to a certain extent, anyway) in kids under 5. So doctors treat the symptoms and talk about ear tubes, but how often do they test for food allergies? I know I had to bring it up with my Ped (who thankfully was receptive). So how many kids do you think with frequent ear infections actually have a food allergy? I'm guessing quite a few.

So the same probably goes with cranky and defiant behavior. If you've done what you can to prevent the situation (been consistent, made sure they're getting frequent meals and consistent rest, etc) and especially if her behavior has changed without other explaination, it really won't hurt to try. I'm probably the least informed on what to eliminate and in what order, but I'm sure that artificial coloring, sugar, and gluten will be at the top of the list. I know that my daughter's behavior improved immensely when we eliminated artificial color and refined sugar.

Good luck!
Good point! We eat absolutely no processed foods or refined sugar so we are good there. gluten will be our next step....Our situation is difficult right now because we are in a hotel till April 5th. Then we can get settled so right now we will try to avoid gluten the best we can till then I guess Thank you
post #4 of 5
Glad I could help I'm sure some of the other moms will have some info to add too. Some of the moms on here know SOOOOO much it kind of freaks me out.
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by brandislee View Post
Glad I could help I'm sure some of the other moms will have some info to add too. Some of the moms on here know SOOOOO much it kind of freaks me out.
haha I know.... They're so knowledgeable...I hoping to get there someday...allergies is just so new to me
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