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Husband has been "prescribed" a low-fat, cholesterol-lowering diet...help! - Page 2

post #21 of 60
Quote:
my dad's cholesterol was up and the doctor wanted to put him on meds. he had a heart scan that showed he had no plaque build up at all. i think that we see a number and want to treat and don't always look at the whole picture.

as for your dh, he needs to be on board to make any sort of diet change. i would say cut out all the sweets and soda and eat more whole foods. but he has to want to do that.

YES, it's all about DIET, DIET, DIET!!! but you make no money as a Dr - you can't write scripts for food!!!

for the poster- IF you have insurance, ask to speak to a certified nutritionist (outside of the Dr. group you DH is seeing) and you know what they will tell you already - but go armed with questions, make them come up with examples for you on what to feed him (question, question question them, have them show you what they are saying regarding actual studies, etc) and have your DH hear it from someone else about drinking soda, and eating junk-some times it's better to hear it from someone else, regardless of all the low-fat BS you will get- it's a start
post #22 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamaofthree View Post
as for your dh, he needs to be on board to make any sort of diet change. i would say cut out all the sweets and soda and eat more whole foods. but he has to want to do that.


Unfortunately, if he's not willing to make the changes, any little things you do aren't really going to make much of an impact. I feel you on the soda problem... it took me years to wean my DH off soda.

Honestly, I'd sit down with your DH and ask him if he wants to tackle the problem or not. If he doesn't, there's nothing you can do about it - you can change the food you keep in the house and that you prepare for him, but if he's willing to go out and buy other stuff, that doesn't really help.

The first step I took with *my* DH was to go low carb (this was before I'd heard of TF). The thing about LC is that it can really appeal to men - all the bacon and steak and pork, etc. that they want. But it gives you the opportunity to remove the sugar, the junk food, and the grains from his diet (and it's not incompatible with TF at all). I definitely always recommend that the whole family make the change, though. And you have to play your part - that may mean meal planning and keeping plenty of snacks on hand, and packing his lunch every day (this is what I had to do). While we no longer LC, my DH got conditioned so that now when he's hungry he doesn't go for junk food, he reaches for cheese, and we haven't been LC in years.

You say he doesn't care for veggies - does he eat ANY? While I would have said the same thing about my guy years ago, I discovered that what he didn't like was poorly prepared veggies. If they're well done, he actually loves (most of) them. But in the beginning, we were limited to broccoli and peas. So I went with it. I tried different ways of preparing them so *I* didn't get bored and just made sure he got at least 1 serving of veg/day. Now he gets probably 3 servings/day (voluntarily).

For the soda problem - how about 100% juice with club soda? Will he drink that? At least then it's not full of artificial flavoring/coloring and there's no HFCS, and far less sugar... and over time you can reduce the amount of juice in the mix. I always made the drinks for my DH - so I could adjust it as I saw fit.

OK - the baby just woke up. Those are my suggestions of where to start. HTH.
post #23 of 60
I was just prescribed the same thing yesterday by a nutritionist--low fat, high carb. I was fuming on the way home because the woman wouldn't let me get a word in edgewise.

So what I want to do is take her suggestions on portion size, and make it low-carb and TF. I have an appt to see her in a month. I hope I can do this, lose weight, and see the look on her face. I figure it could be a chance to educate her.

But I agree with the other posters. If he's not willing to change, it will be a long uphill battle. I hope the best for you and him!
post #24 of 60
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post
You say he doesn't care for veggies - does he eat ANY? While I would have said the same thing about my guy years ago, I discovered that what he didn't like was poorly prepared veggies. If they're well done, he actually loves (most of) them. But in the beginning, we were limited to broccoli and peas. So I went with it. I tried different ways of preparing them so *I* didn't get bored and just made sure he got at least 1 serving of veg/day. Now he gets probably 3 servings/day (voluntarily).

For the soda problem - how about 100% juice with club soda? Will he drink that? At least then it's not full of artificial flavoring/coloring and there's no HFCS, and far less sugar... and over time you can reduce the amount of juice in the mix. I always made the drinks for my DH - so I could adjust it as I saw fit.
The club soda/juice thing is a GREAT idea. Not really sure why I couldn't come up with that myself! ;-) He actually has been really good this past week about the soda...I have not seen him have ANY at home. And I told him I was proud of him (I'm a teacher, and it's like with the kids...positive reinforcement!). He's been drinking iced tea (made from a mix, granted, but better than soda). And I'm going to start brewing real iced tea for him and he can add agave as he sees fit (he already uses --and likes-- agave in his coffee). (We switched to the agave over a year ago because when we first started living together and I saw how much sugar he put in his coffee I was appalled. So he *is* amenable to some things!)

Also, he will eat veggies in casseroles or smothered with cheese. He loves broccoli casserole that my mom makes at holidays. And she uses Bisquick for the topping but I'm sure I can TF-it somehow. I was also thinking of making some little egg cups/quiches in muffin tins and then I can put them in the fridge/freezer and he can heat one or two up for breakfast quickly instead of having a breakfast bar (which is what he usually grabs...we do buy organic ones, however). And he likes yogurt, so I usually try to get him to eat one of those a day...for breakfast or a snack.

So I think the juice/seltzer will definitely help continue to beat the soda addiction. Now we just have to work on the cereal!!
post #25 of 60
I have found that my DD eats more veg if I blanch them and she can dip them in bleu cheese dressing. We also found that roasting the veg adds a lot more flavor.
post #26 of 60
YOu can try making Kefir soda for him. I make it for us and my 4 yo son loves his 'soda'. We drink fizzy water here (pellagrino), a PP had the suggestion of mixing it with juice.

Agave-I thought I had read somewhere that agave nectar is just as bad for your blood sugar as regular sugar.

I applaud you for trying to get your DH to make changes. It sounds like it will not be easy. I wouldn't go overboard on the praise, have you read 'Unconditional Parenting'? The idea is if you let him experience these changes (hopefully he will feel better eating nourishing food) then he will want to do it on his own. If you praise him all the time, he will eat the foods in front of you/for you but not truly internalize his motivation for eating NT.

Could you make it like a contest/bet/game? Challenge him (and offer to cook for him!) to eat 100% NT for a certain amount of time, maybe a week and see how he feels? What will help him is if he can really FEEL the difference in his energy and vitality, then he will want to eat healthier. Also, if he gets out of some habits (sugar, soda, tea) all at once, he won't have cravings for it as much.

Good luck!
post #27 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueridgewoman View Post
Has he tried a low carb diet yet? I'd suggest giving that a go before trying a low fat one, really...
this.
low carb is an effective way, as far as i know, to improve blood sugar and lose weight. id recomend a few sites, books etc with info regarding lower carb lifestyle-

book- Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes

www.paleonu.com

www.heartscanblog.blogspot.com/

www.marksdailyapple.com

also agave is not doing his blood sugar any favors, its processed almost identically to how hfcs is processed and despite the ads claiming its low glycemic it is not, it will raise your blood sugar just as will honey, maple syrup etc. sugar is sugar and it raises your blood sugar and contributes to tons of problems, not the least of which is diabetes, weight gain, etc.

check the grams of sugar and carbs on those "organic" breafast bars, id guess its at least 20-40 grams carbs per bar. and very little protien and almost no essential vitamins or minerals. breakfast bars are a treat, not a meal or even a real food.
post #28 of 60
Really? All these posts and only one person mentioned exercise? All the diet changes in the world are only throwing pebbles at the problem. Exercise is the big gun.
post #29 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambereva View Post
Really? All these posts and only one person mentioned exercise? All the diet changes in the world are only throwing pebbles at the problem. Exercise is the big gun.
i dont totally agree, but just wanted to say i checed out yr blog and you do look awesome and super strong! i think being active is essential to living a happy, healthy life but i personally believe cutting sugars in all thier forms and cutting out all processed foods is a great first step towords total health.
post #30 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by organicmidwestmama View Post
i dont totally agree, but just wanted to say i checed out yr blog and you do look awesome and super strong! i think being active is essential to living a happy, healthy life but i personally believe cutting sugars in all thier forms and cutting out all processed foods is a great first step towords total health.
Don't come near my fruit. But yeah, processed food is awful and I don't eat any and don't think anyone else should either. Diet changes ARE important, I didn't mean to come off as saying they're inconsequential. Heck, throw enough pebbles at a problem and you're bound to make a serious dent. But exercise is the way to make giant health improvements in one fell swoop.
post #31 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambereva View Post
Really? All these posts and only one person mentioned exercise? All the diet changes in the world are only throwing pebbles at the problem. Exercise is the big gun.
This really is true. I have a few older friends on BP medication and one is off it now do to a good exercise program and of course eating a good diet. Getting your heart pumping and moving can do amazingly healing things.
post #32 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambereva View Post
Don't come near my fruit. But yeah, processed food is awful and I don't eat any and don't think anyone else should either. Diet changes ARE important, I didn't mean to come off as saying they're inconsequential. Heck, throw enough pebbles at a problem and you're bound to make a serious dent. But exercise is the way to make giant health improvements in one fell swoop.
i wasnt really refering to fruit, though some fruits (bananas, grapes, melon to name a few) are quite high in sugar albiet they do come with a good dose of vitamins. i was refering to honey, maple syrup, agave, sugar, etc. i think folks lie me who are into nutrition and cooking are easily swayed by the whole "natural sugar" is ok idea when really agave or honey will still raise your blood glucose and cause health problems.
post #33 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by witchygrrl View Post
I was just prescribed the same thing yesterday by a nutritionist--low fat, high carb. I was fuming on the way home because the woman wouldn't let me get a word in edgewise.

So what I want to do is take her suggestions on portion size, and make it low-carb and TF. I have an appt to see her in a month. I hope I can do this, lose weight, and see the look on her face. I figure it could be a chance to educate her.

But I agree with the other posters. If he's not willing to change, it will be a long uphill battle. I hope the best for you and him!
my mom recently did this, lowered grain intake to almost nothing and is eating a moderate amount of carbs at 80-100g/day and has lost 10lbs in 1 month. she also walks a few miles a day.
post #34 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambereva View Post
Really? All these posts and only one person mentioned exercise? All the diet changes in the world are only throwing pebbles at the problem. Exercise is the big gun.
Actually, all the exercise in the world isn't going to make someone healthy if all they're eating is junk food. It may add muscle tone, it may even speed up their metabolism, but a chemical-laden diet is still a chemical-laden diet.

And it is perfectly possible to be fit and still be unhealthy.
post #35 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by organicmidwestmama View Post
i wasnt really refering to fruit, though some fruits (bananas, grapes, melon to name a few) are quite high in sugar albiet they do come with a good dose of vitamins. i was refering to honey, maple syrup, agave, sugar, etc. i think folks lie me who are into nutrition and cooking are easily swayed by the whole "natural sugar" is ok idea when really agave or honey will still raise your blood glucose and cause health problems.
If a person is getting adequate exercise, sugar (ie, glucose, sucrose, fructose etc, ie carbs) becomes fuel rather than foe (as was it's original function).
post #36 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post
Actually, all the exercise in the world isn't going to make someone healthy if all they're eating is junk food. It may add muscle tone, it may even speed up their metabolism, but a chemical-laden diet is still a chemical-laden diet.

And it is perfectly possible to be fit and still be unhealthy.
Just repeating what I said in a subsequent post:

'Diet changes ARE important, I didn't mean to come off as saying they're inconsequential. Heck, throw enough pebbles at a problem and you're bound to make a serious dent. But exercise is the way to make giant health improvements in one fell swoop.'

Both diet and exercise changes are important, but exercise is going to make a bigger and faster impact. it's not either/or, that's just black and white thinking. Do both. But DO BOTH.
post #37 of 60
Why is everyone so afraid to think of exercise? I can't imagine anyone advocating exercise NOT advocating a healthy diet AS WELL. Sure you can be fit and unhealthy, and you can be overweight and very healthy and never have problems.

Humans were meant to be lean and strong. Early people always moved, they had to. There was no crap processed food to eat. If everyone modeled the way we were meant to live there would probably be no need blood pressure cholesterol issues.

I am really in to fitness, because it is a hobby and ultimately my profession some day, but even walking outside everyday after dinner is good. You just have to MOVE, and get your heart pumpkin. Nutritionists/doctors are not all encompassing evil. a nutritionist will always tell you to couple a diet with exercise. I'm seriously baffled on this forum in particular, how anti fitness the vibe tends to be.
post #38 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambereva View Post
If a person is getting adequate exercise, sugar (ie, glucose, sucrose, fructose etc, ie carbs) becomes fuel rather than foe (as was it's original function).
totally true, but the fact is most americans arent getting really significant amounts of brief but intense excercize every day. many people arent doing this, and if that is the case they will get fat and sick (metabolic problems) consuming lots of sugar, naturally occuring or not. an athlete, or someone being as active as we are assuming our ansestors 1000 yrs back, can use carbs and sugar for fuel easily, but a sedentary person will have an impossible time doing this.

perhaps the reason there are "anti" fitness ideas in tf forum is because it is primarily an eating/food forum, not a fitness forum, though logically the two parts of our lives are intertwined.

i personally would describe myself as moderately active. i walk, and bike maybe 3 times a week, and run after my kids, but i dont ever work out in the classic sense. i am thin, at a healthy bmi of 21, eat plenty of real omnivorous food and lower carbs (under 100 grams day) and i have consistent bp of 100/70, heart rate about 60 bpm and am rarely ill. so for me i havent found it to be necessary to purposefully work out to maintain health and weight. that said i dont watch tv and am outside a lot so im not on the couch, per sey, either.
post #39 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by organicmidwestmama View Post
totally true, but the fact is most americans arent getting really significant amounts of brief but intense excercize every day. many people arent doing this, and if that is the case they will get fat and sick (metabolic problems) consuming lots of sugar, naturally occuring or not. an athlete, or someone being as active as we are assuming our ansestors 1000 yrs back, can use carbs and sugar for fuel easily, but a sedentary person will have an impossible time doing this.

perhaps the reason there are "anti" fitness ideas in tf forum is because it is primarily an eating/food forum, not a fitness forum, though logically the two parts of our lives are intertwined.

i personally would describe myself as moderately active. i walk, and bike maybe 3 times a week, and run after my kids, but i dont ever work out in the classic sense. i am thin, at a healthy bmi of 21, eat plenty of real omnivorous food and lower carbs (under 100 grams day) and i have consistent bp of 100/70, heart rate about 60 bpm and am rarely ill. so for me i havent found it to be necessary to purposefully work out to maintain health and weight. that said i dont watch tv and am outside a lot so im not on the couch, per sey, either.
Well, that should be rethought. This is a traditional foods forum, but you COULD NOT discuss eating and living as a traditional society without speaking of the fact that these people worked hard, and moved every day. No you don't need to be a gym rat, but to think you can sit on your ass all day and just eat good is another story.
post #40 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by 425lisamarie View Post
No you don't need to be a gym rat, but to think you can sit on your ass all day and just eat good is another story.
Please point to the post where someone on this forum has suggested that. That not everyone here is raving about exercise as the way to cure whatever doesn't mean we are a bunch of dim, sedentary people. Yesterday, I spent about three hours digging post holes by hand and putting up fencing for a chicken yard. My DP and I even joked about the fact that people pay to exercise when there are so many free opportunities just around out little home. A triathlete I am not, but I believe my lifestyle growing our own food, keeping livestock, doing all home projects ourselves is closer to a traditional "exercise" profile than an apartment dweller who spends hours at the gym or running every week.

Every thread like this I have seen, exercise gets brought up. Good point, thank you. But often the message comes across as confrontational and judgmental, honestly, especially when anyone responds that exercise alone is not enough for many people. The exercise message is available just about anywhere and everywhere. The advice and experiences shared on this board are not.
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