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Hand/arm falling asleep while knitting...

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Anyone had this happen? Any ideas on causes/ways to avoid? It's really annoying, especially since I'm in a knitting co-op and have a deadline to meet.
post #2 of 14
All the time- especially if I've been doing it a lot. I usually shake it out- but sometimes I have to take a rest. HTH
post #3 of 14
Would knitting on circulars help? I think someone told me that straight needles makes her carpal tunnel syndrome act up... I only knit on circulars so I can't compare.
post #4 of 14
It happenes to me too, even on circulars. I knit Continental, and it's my right hand that usually goes numb. I just take a break. Not sure what else would help.
post #5 of 14
I've been wondering if those compression gloves would help. I don't know what I'm talking about, but I have this vivid memory of seeing something at a quilt show years ago that was designed to help with carpal tunnel but allow crafting ....

I knit & crochet in bed mostly, and this happens all the time, regardless of the craft. I shake it off, then try to lower my arms (which can be hard because then I can't SEE the project). My chiropractor suggested a stretch where you stand in a doorway, and hold your arms up to the side, bent at elbows, hands at ear level, and push into the doorway til you feel the stretch. I don't do it nearly enough to see an improvement, but I'm trying.
post #6 of 14
carpal tunnel

I had it bad when i was pregnant with DS2. It is still very, very slight in both hands, but it is going away.

It sucks. Sorry you are experiencing it.
post #7 of 14
My chiropractor is a knitter herself. She has some exercise techniques for sane knitters. However, she acknowledges that pregnant women and really serious knitters just need frequent adjustments. I should know; my nesting urge takes the form of maniacal knitting and crocheting.
post #8 of 14
I'm not sure when my arms started to go numb, but I do know it happened occasionally when I was regularly seeing a chiropractor to help fix my back after a car accident. I'm glad I found this thread as I was just knitting a scarf for a Christmas present and both my arms were going numb before I could get through the end of a row of 40 stitches. I'm interested in hearing what some stretches I could do are.
post #9 of 14

ugh it's probably carpel tunnel.  I have it so bad it takes me FOREVER to finish a project.  my hands go completely numb, usually at the base of my thumb first.  I know there's a surgery to relieve the pressure on the nerve there, but i doubt I'll go that route.  I'm actually glad i found this, i'd like to know how to fix it myself :)

post #10 of 14

it is carpel. go to a chiro for an adjustment and exercise/stretch advice.

post #11 of 14

I have this issue in my left hand. I used to have it in my right as well before I had the surgery to fix it. (SO WORTH IT!)  

 

I tried the chiro with no help. Changing positions will help for short amounts of time and I have never tried the compression gloves but worth a try!

 

Be careful, I think me ignoring the pain of carpel tunnel made it worse quickly and in a short time it soon got so bad in my right wrist that I could not sleep a wink without a wrist splint on and that only minimally helped. Listed to your body and rest when needed!

 

If it gets so bad that you decide surgery is a good option my heal time was very quickly and I needed no physical therapy I think in part due to knitting as soon as I could after surgery.

 

Good luck. : )

post #12 of 14

I know to some people this may sound crazy- and it will probably seem difficult at first- but it's no harder than learning to knit- and you already did that once.  It's to knit with more than one technique... switch back and forth from English and Continental... mix it up and instead of turning and then purling- knit backwards etc.  The stitches really don't care how you make them, which side of the work is facing you or what direction you approach them from- as long as you don't twist them (unless you want to twist them... then twist away!) .  Having the ability to switch styles will let those muscles rest- or never tire in the first place.

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah View Post

I know to some people this may sound crazy- and it will probably seem difficult at first- but it's no harder than learning to knit- and you already did that once.  It's to knit with more than one technique... switch back and forth from English and Continental... mix it up and instead of turning and then purling- knit backwards etc.  The stitches really don't care how you make them, which side of the work is facing you or what direction you approach them from- as long as you don't twist them (unless you want to twist them... then twist away!) .  Having the ability to switch styles will let those muscles rest- or never tire in the first place.


This is brilliant, and I am going to try it! Thanks!

post #14 of 14
There is such thing as compression gloves. I have a pair and they're amazing. I get cold and tired hands from crocheting. They're sold at any crafting store, most likely. I got mine from Michael's. They're bright neon green smile.gif
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