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Anyone try the Enuresis Treatment Center?  

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
We have just started treatment at the Enuresis Treatment Center in Farmington Hills, Michigan. DD has NEVER been dry at night. She just turned 7. Our ped. is great, totally against meds. But we needed to do something!

We found this place online. It is very close to where we live. So far, it's been kind of exhausting, but the overall "plan" makes sense. Also it is very expensive, but they do give you your money back if it doesn't work.

I'm just wondering if there are other people on MDC who have tried this place.

Thanks in advance!
post #2 of 19
I know nothing about this center but just want to contribute that our DS1 just turned 7 and is not consistently dry at night. We have friends whose son was not dry at night until he was almost ten. We have been told it is not that uncommon.
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks, laundrycrisis. (By the way, LOVE the username!) From the research we've done, bedwetting is definitely more common in boys than in girls. It seems that boys tend to "outgrow" it more often than girls too.

Our daughter herself is just frustrated. She asked me to help her stop peeing at night. We did a lot of searching and this place just seemed best for us.

We have a friend with a daughter who is 13 and still wetting the bed. She can't spend the night at a friends, can't go to camp, etc. I kind of think that made us freak out a little that this might last a long time.

But I do truly appreciate you responding and giving your insight.
post #4 of 19
i never had a dry night till i was 13. and my dd was dry by 20 months.

my parents explained it to me as my body still not producing the one hormone needed for me to know its time to go to the bathroom at night.

what is the center saying why your dd wets the bed? ah i just checked them out. sleep disorder. are they saying they sleep too deeply that one cant be woken up. that would be me though.

interesting.

i am not sure i buy into it though. something just doesnt seem right. i mean at some point of time you stay dry. does anyone know anyone who has wetted the bed thru out their lives - off and on?

however i am sure you dont want this to become the debate thread.

i hope this system works for your dd. it must be heartwrenching when she asks for help on this.
post #5 of 19
I think it's great that you are working to give her the help she has asked for.

One idea to try is chiropractic; I have heard of some kids who have an improvement in bowel and urinary related problems with chiropractic treatment.

I'm also curious about what the center does.
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Meemee, you're right, they treat this as a sleep disorder, but we're also working on kegels, etc. to help strengthen her "lock muscle."

You really would think that everyone grows out of it, but at this place they have testimonials from adults who were still wetting the bed. I think that there are people (adults) who do this and there are A LOT more kids out there who do it than we think. It's such a taboo subject.

Parents don't talk about it. We don't want to embarrass our kids. Also, when I have discussed this with some people, I get the vibe that it's a parenting issue. So then it's MY fault! (DD LOVED to be rocked to sleep when she was smaller, and I did it for a very long time because, heck I LOVED it too. Family members have hinted that this may have caused her enuresis.)

Thanks for all of the positive comments. I'm not sure I believe everything this place is telling me either, but it seems to me to be the best approach I've read about. And...she was dry last night for the first time ever.
post #7 of 19
My uncle wet the bed until he was at least 18.

I wet the bed through 6th grade. My dad tried several methods of "help", most punishment based. I'll never forget sleeping on what looked like a giant window screen, with a plastic mat on it (all on my bed). It set off an alarm when I peed. Then I would be forced to get up, clean the thing, clean the bed. Change the sheets. Etc. Etc. It looked ridiculous. It was uncomfortable and it didn't work! I wish someone would have thought to seek another type of treatment for me as it caused MAJOR embarassment as I began to want to do sleepovers and such. I basically dealt with it by isolating myself and I guess eventually I just grew out of it.

I think it's wonderful that you are seeking help for her, especially since she's asked for that help.
post #8 of 19
There apparently is a correlation between bedwetting in childhood and withheld emotions. Does your daughter tend to hold things in emotionally? Think of the pee as withheld tears finding a different way out....at night, when she has no control. Ask about her dream life...there will be more clues there about her level of stress in her daytime life. Any chance she cries out in her sleep or wakes up crying from time to time? Just a thought...
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kindermama View Post
There apparently is a correlation between bedwetting in childhood and withheld emotions. Does your daughter tend to hold things in emotionally? Think of the pee as withheld tears finding a different way out....at night, when she has no control. Ask about her dream life...there will be more clues there about her level of stress in her daytime life. Any chance she cries out in her sleep or wakes up crying from time to time? Just a thought...
My dd cries out in her sleep. She is also a bedwetter at age 6.

How do I know if she is holding in her emotions? I don't see that she would be since she throws the worlds most crazy intense temper tantrums all the time.
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Kindermama, I really think that my DD has a sleep disorder. Before we tried this, I would wake her up every 2-3 hours during the night to get her to pee. She would have absolutely NO memory of this. Even now, during this treatment, when she gets up at night, she'll have a complete conversation with me, I assume she's fully awake, and then she'll ask me if she got up at night when she wakes in the a.m.

DD is really good at expressing her emotions. I definitely think enuresis could have multiple causes, but she doesn't really cry at night, except when she's coming down with something, then she's crabby during her sleep - go figure!

I also think DD has a weak bladder locking muscle, we've been working on kegels and we've seen some improvement. We're keeping our fingers crossed!
post #11 of 19
"Kindermama, I really think that my DD has a sleep disorder. Before we tried this, I would wake her up every 2-3 hours during the night to get her to pee. She would have absolutely NO memory of this. Even now, during this treatment, when she gets up at night, she'll have a complete conversation with me, I assume she's fully awake, and then she'll ask me if she got up at night when she wakes in the a.m."

I consider that totally normal. Kids are deep sleepers. There have been studies done that show lots of children will sleep right through smoke alarms. They never hear them. I used to get my dd up at night to pee all the time and she never remembered it.

DD stopped wetting the bed at 3 months shy of her 7th birthday. I tried lots of things but in the end, she just stopped. And up to that point, she'd been wetting almost every night, sometimes 2-3 times/night.

Here's one thing that may have contributed, although I'm not sure. I'd been getting her up 2 and 3 times/night to pee. I finally thought, hey, maybe because she's not fully conscious, her body is getting the message that it's OK to pee at night. So, when I didn't get her up at the right time, her body would let go and wet the bed.

So I stopped getting her up at night. Cold turkey. She wet the bed for the first few nights, then there were sporadic dry nights, then she stopped wetting the bed. I will tell you honestly that I was completely astonished. I thought, given all the effort I'd put into worrying about it and trying different things with absolutely no result, that she'd be wet through until her teens (as was my nephew and his dad). Now, the timing could have been totally coincidental so I'm not saying what I did contributed at all to having her stop wetting the bed.

Just goes to show, we never know what's going to happen.

I'm not suggesting you stop what you're doing, just thought you might like to hear our story.
post #12 of 19
FWIW, my DD wet her bed almost every night until she was 7 or so, after which time she slowly grew out of it.
post #13 of 19
My 7 yr. old wets the bed, too. It's annoying for him (and me) but it really doesn't impede his social life. We sent him to sleepaway camp last summer with tips on how to be discreet about his pull-ups, but when he came home he told me that 3 of the 4 boys in his cabin (6-7 yr. olds) wore pull-ups at night! He's had sleepovers at our house and others.
He's also a *very* deep sleeper and is almost impossible to wake at night (or in the morning for school ). I think he really just sleeps too deeply. We've noticed him getting up to pee sometimes over the past 6 mos. or so, though, so I have hope he is starting to outgrow it!
We live in the same general area but I would not spend a lot of money on this bedwetting business. Our pediatrician reassured us that this is very, very common at 7 and even for a couple more years and that nothing is really proven to help them outgrow it sooner.
post #14 of 19

I am 23 years old and have been constantly told that I'm lazy because of my bedwetting. It's so frustrating! I have some dry nights and wake up out of my sleep to pee on occassion but no consistant success. I have tried medicines and had tests run but it seems like there hasn't been any change. I've suffered from enuresis since birth. I don't have the money for the treatment center (I dont think. I haven't called yet.) would anyone care to share what they were told at the enuresis treatment center?   *desperate*

post #15 of 19
You might find this thread useful T1redofthis:

http://www.mothering.com/community/forum/thread/1304589/enuresis-treatment-center

I'm concerned for my three children (6,4,2) as my 6yr old is becoming increasingly frustrated in pull ups at night and DD is 4 and showing no signs of a dry night and as a 37yr mother old who never outgrew this problem myself I know better than to trust the 'wait & see' approach my Drs advise. Alarms & meds never worked for me so a new approach appeals & maybe we can all solve the (hereditary?) problem together :-)

Good luck all!
post #16 of 19

happy to hear the progress

 

post #17 of 19
Aquitane... I am curious to know how this went. I have looked into this program. We haven't tried anything else yet.

My son is 7 and never has dry nights. He had night terrors until he was 3 or 4 and leaks during the day. I was also a bedwetter until I was probably 7 or so. Iwas a super deep sleeper. I remember feeling so ashamed! I have been hyper sensitive to my son's feelings and maybe should have started treatment sooner.

Anyway, I am looking for unbiased feedback of the center. Any help would be appreciated!
post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 

JJLeonard26, DD has been completely dry since late spring of last year.  She had one minor setback in fall of 2010, she had a UTI and she had a slight drip of an accident. It was really no big deal.  Since then she has been fine.

 

I can't say my opinion is unbiased.  The program worked for us.  But, I do think it is ridiculously expensive.  I didn't do everything they told me to do with my daughter.  I did most of the things, but some were unrealistic. 

 

If you want more info. please PM me and I'll go over the whole process.

post #19 of 19

Practitioner reviews belong here


Edited by MoonWillow - 8/7/11 at 8:51am
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