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How does Wool work?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
So, it's been explained to me a few times, but I still don't fully comprehend.

Wool as a cover allows the dampness to evaporate through it, correct? So how does this (or even fleece) work well for some at night? Because wouldn't the pressure of the child on the bed make the bed wet? One of my friend's says that the onesie gets a little damp but the bed is dry? Why?

And when someone says they are using a wool soaker, does that mean cover? Or absorbent material in the diaper? Does the wool absorb if it's not lanolized? What about a wool doubler?

Thanks! Hopefully this will clear up my wool confusion once and for all.
post #2 of 12
You know, I never could wrap my head around it either. It's like a combination of water-resistance and water-absorbance. It absorbs some, without feeling wet, and somehow resists having the wetness seep through (yet it dries easily).
It doesn't really make a lot of sense, but it works great! I love my wool.
(Oh, and I don't use lanolin. I didn't think it really made a difference, and after reading about the chemicals in that stuff, I sure was glad I didn't need it. I make my soakers out of felted sweaters and just throw them in the wash with everything else.)
post #3 of 12
post #4 of 12
OP- FWIW, we happen to use sposies at night right now and the onesie has a damp feeling in the morning but the bed and jammies are dry. I don't think this is a wool only thing.

I was skeptical upon using my first pair of wool longies. I knew there were so, so, so many mama's out there raving about it (and I love to knit) but I just didn't see how it could work. Then I thought, "my grandmother used it" and I respect her immensely so I gave it a go.
HOLY COW! I was so thrilled after giving wool a try and I currently have three pairs of home knit shorts drying after lanolizing and one on the needles. I cannot wait to use them.
Another thing I like about home knit wool is the cost. Once you find a pattern that works for you (and there are tons of free or very inexpensive patterns online), purchase the necessary needles, and yarn I would estimate you'll spend $20 or so and be able to make your first few pair of wool longies (depending on size). If you're looking for soakers you'll obviously get more of those for your dollar. The first yarn I bought was bargain yarn in the event I didn't care for using wool. Since then I've started using things like cashmere for the waist as that is against ds skin. He's spoiled!

GL and hth
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
nak

thanks everyone!

i have a few different skeins of wool sitting here and have been looking at patterns on ravelry, i just haven't jumped in yet. i've never knit with wool yet for anything
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicole730 View Post
nak

thanks everyone!

i have a few different skeins of wool sitting here and have been looking at patterns on ravelry, i just haven't jumped in yet. i've never knit with wool yet for anything
IMHO, the pimp my longies free pattern makes the best longies/shorties and has great instructions and photos for a beginner.
GL!
post #7 of 12
I just made my first soaker cover for DS, the punk knitters pattern, it seems great. I used clearance yarn bee wool from hobby lobby, about $2 worth for a cover, can't beat that! I lanolized it for water resistance, I suppose without that it does more absorbing than repelling...I wanted to make sure it didn't wick through. It will take me a few days before I fully trust this, as it's homemade and has no PUL I love it though, sooo soft and nice.
post #8 of 12
Do you put your kids in soakers as the outside layer or put an outfit over it?
post #9 of 12
for us - the soaker IS the pants or shorts - nothing on top of it except in the winter sometimes a creeper.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juvysen View Post
Do you put your kids in soakers as the outside layer or put an outfit over it?
I use the wool soaker as the pants/shorts.
Besides using kissaluvs, prefolds, and flats with wool I also use pul covers and bumware under outfits without wool but wool happens to be my favorite.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Casha'sMommy View Post
IMHO, the pimp my longies free pattern makes the best longies/shorties and has great instructions and photos for a beginner.
GL!
Thanks, I'll look at that one.
post #12 of 12
Wool and polyfleece are dispersion covers, where PUL, ProCare and other barrier types are containment covers.

Containment is simple, a waterproof barrier stops moisture from escaping. Dispersion covers are a little harder to explain -- they don't trap moisture, they spread it around into a web of non absorbing fibers the same way a foam sponge soaks up moisture. The surface area of napped or felted fabric is quite large, so a lot of moisture can get dispursed through the fabric's web. Since these fibers are non hydrating (non absorbing) they are quick to handoff the moisture to the air, so a long as there is air flow across them they will transfer quite a bit of moisture to the air through evaporation.

Dispersion covers are not waterproof, so expect some spill through if you niss a change or your internal diaper gets saturated.
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