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What is wrong with GMO foods? - Page 2

post #21 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mambera View Post
That is Non. Sense. Nonsense.

I agree that Monsanto et al are not making the best use of GM technology but the problem lies with the agribusiness model, not with the technology itself, which has the potential to be used either for great harm or for great good.
I respectively disagree...Genetically Modified technology hasn't been beneficial. GMO foods are detrimental - it IS NOT the way to feed the growing population. Because it isn't yielding larger crops - GM Soy decreased yields 20% compared to NonGM soy.
I believe GM food/crops are being pushed down our throats in the name of preventing world hunger when really the opposite is happening. In the end it will work out for Monsanto...there will be less hungry people because there will be less people.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...ied-Foods.aspx

This link above sums up GMO in a few paragraphs and it's straight forward.
post #22 of 55
Whether a genetic alteration is dangerous depends on the actual informational content of the gene, and the use to which its product is put.

Saying genetic modification is dangerous is like saying writing is dangerous. OK some writing can be dangerous (like information on how to make a fertilizer bomb), other writing can be really useful and helpful.

Running around yelling "Writing is dangerous! Writing is dangerous!" just sounds illiterate and poorly informed.

It's not the bare fact of an altered gene. It's what is IN THE GENE that matters.
post #23 of 55
Thread Starter 
@mambera
I stated it very simply so as to make it easy to understand. When an animal eats a GM grain that is bred with the terminator gene, the dna of that animal then takes on the characteristics of that terminator gene. This has been proven by the independent research available, of which there is very little since most scientists are connected in some way to Gig Agra, Big Pharma, or Big Govt.
You are what you eat is an old adage, and one that is very true. If you are ingesting grains bred with pesticides or herbicide resistance, your body takes on that quality. This is ancient knowledge. In Chinese medicine one learns of Chi and energies associated with everything, including foods. This is a way that can be corroborated by looking at the atoms of food or by examining it as a whole for its 'energy'. They are the same thing. Ingesting these foreign bits of DNA is leading to a large epidemic of illness in many ways. Mysterious illnesses as well as familiar ones are rising exponentially.
This is in reference to the honeybees and GMO
http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.p...xt=va&aid=8436
@christianmomof3
Organic is not the same thing as non GMO necessarily. The peaches that are not organic have not been genetically modified that we know of. The only produce that has been genetically modified that I know of is papaya (as melissa mentioned) tomatoes, corn and pineapple (mostly the hawaii pineapple). The danger of produce that is not organic is the pesticide load. The dirty dozen refers to the pesticide load. If there are only conventionally grown peaches available, I would not buy peaches. The 'cheapness' of the corn is deceptive. You will pay now for organic corn (frozen if that is all they have) or later in health costs for the conventional GM corn that was ingested (most of the time in the form of HFCS which is ALL produced from GMO corn). I mostly avoid corn altogether as much of it has been compromised by GMO. I also avoid soy, canola, wheat, (new)cotton (I have many old cotton things). Those crops have been overtaken by GMO at about 98% or higher.

I feel so strongly about making sure what we eat is safe that I would move if alternatives where not available. There are shipping companies like Azure Standard that do drops all over the US. However, by changing what I eat I have made a large impact. By eating very little meat, I have extra money for the organic produce. I buy organic dried beans in bulk, nuts and seeds for my protein intake. I am still eating eggs (mostly in baked goods like pancakes) and ethically, organically raised chicken breast was still on menu last week, but I may be done with that too. I have been gluten/ casein (dairy) and soy free for a few months now and that really limits the possibility of ingesting GMO there. I am also canola free. This means I have no 'spread' for potatoes or rice, but I have learned to like them with coconut oil.


After watching the documentary I quoted yesterday I realize this- the future depends on us not eating animals or their byproducts and learning what 'wild' plants are edible. By learning to ecoharvest and teaching it to our children, we can ensure they will have a means to feed themselves when the bottom falls out for the foods consumed in today's world. By returning to the roots of our nomadic ways we can find a way to adapt to what has been unleashed. I still have an organic garden and still shop at the store. This is a new ideal I have to learn to eat from the wild. I do make pine needle tea in the winter already though for extra vitamin c (one cup has more vitamin c than 5 cups of orange juice)

okay i am rambling now. have a lovely day! learn about indigenous edible plants and educate us all
post #24 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by karika View Post
I stated it very simply so as to make it easy to understand. When an animal eats a GM grain that is bred with the terminator gene, the dna of that animal then takes on the characteristics of that terminator gene.
All I can infer from this is that you're saying foods produced from GURT seeds have "bad vibrations." Animals don't readily gobble up functional genes from food.
post #25 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by karika View Post
@mambera
I stated it very simply so as to make it easy to understand. When an animal eats a GM grain that is bred with the terminator gene, the dna of that animal then takes on the characteristics of that terminator gene.
No. It does not. That's like saying you can improve your vocabulary by eating a dictionary.

(If it were so easy to modify DNA it wouldn't require so much technological effort to produce GM organisms in the first place!)
post #26 of 55
-For those interested...

Here is how to tell if your fruit/vegetables are conventionally grown, organic, or GMO. Look at the sticker on the produce.

Here's how it works:

For conventionally grown fruit, (grown with chemicals inputs), the PLU code on the sticker consists of four numbers. Organically grown fruit has a five-numeral PLU prefaced by the number 9. Genetically engineered (GM) fruit has a five-numeral PLU prefaced by the number 8.

A conventionally grown banana would be: 4011

An organic banana would be: 94011

A genetically engineered (GE or GMO) banana would be: 84011


I know avoiding GMO can be hard especially since its cheap & the economy we are in - but like 'karika - above poster' we just eat less meat. You wouldn't believe the amount of money you save when you buy less frozen pre-prepared food, meat, junk food, sweets.
post #27 of 55
Yeah, I'm not in favor of GMO foods either, but modiefing the dna of plants and animals just isn't as easy as your making it out to be karika. DNA just doesn't work like that. My dna does *NOT* change everytime I eat something, and neither does a cow or horse or pig or chicken's dna. We can breed for certain traits, but we can't simply have an animal eat something and thereby change its dna. It just doesn't work like that.
post #28 of 55
I don't know enough about genes and DNA to have a discussion about this...but it's very interesting and I wanted to look into it further.

This is what I found.

"The embryo offspring of GM soy-fed mice had altered DNA functioning"

(So if I'm understanding this correctly...it changes the way your DNA acts.)


Also...
In the only human feeding study ever published on genetically modified foods, seven volunteers ate so-called Roundup-ready soybeans. These are soybeans that have herbicide-resistant genes inserted into them in order to survive being sprayed with otherwise deadly doses of Roundup herbicide.

In three of the seven volunteers, the gene inserted into the soy transferred into the DNA of their intestinal bacteria, and continued to function long after they stopped eating the GM soy!

It's discussed in the article below.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...interview.aspx

Again, I don't know much about how DNA works if it doesn't change it - it does seem to alter it's functioning - which is detrimental.
post #29 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelissaAHM View Post
"The embryo offspring of GM soy-fed mice had altered DNA functioning"
That statement is extremely vague. It could mean anything and doesn't say enough for me to determine whether it makes sense or not.

Quote:
In three of the seven volunteers, the gene inserted into the soy transferred into the DNA of their intestinal bacteria, and continued to function long after they stopped eating the GM soy!
Yup, bacteria can swap DNA. It's pretty amazing and is a lot of the reason why they can evolve so quickly. Animals and other multicellular organisms can't do that.

By the way, regarding Roundup Ready crops - really I would imagine that the megadoses of Roundup being used on the crops would be much more detrimental than the Roundup Ready gene itself. I'd have no qualms about eating most genetically modified organisms but I'd be really concerned about eating huge doses of pesticides.

It's a great example of the stupid and harmful uses to which Monsanto is putting a potentially helpful technology.
post #30 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelissaAHM View Post
In three of the seven volunteers, the gene inserted into the soy transferred into the DNA of their intestinal bacteria, and continued to function long after they stopped eating the GM soy!
This appears to be the Jeffrey Smith spin on a study by Trudy Netherwood. The study itself states that "It should be noted that these bacteria contained only a fragment of the [herbicide tolerant] gene, the full-length gene was not detected in these microbes." Without the functional gene, there's no protein, and nothing that could "continue[] to function." (See, e.g., here.)
post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by karika View Post
@mambera

@christianmomof3
Organic is not the same thing as non GMO necessarily. The peaches that are not organic have not been genetically modified that we know of. The only produce that has been genetically modified that I know of is papaya (as melissa mentioned) tomatoes, corn and pineapple (mostly the hawaii pineapple). The danger of produce that is not organic is the pesticide load. The dirty dozen refers to the pesticide load. If there are only conventionally grown peaches available, I would not buy peaches. The 'cheapness' of the corn is deceptive. You will pay now for organic corn (frozen if that is all they have) or later in health costs for the conventional GM corn that was ingested (most of the time in the form of HFCS which is ALL produced from GMO corn). I mostly avoid corn altogether as much of it has been compromised by GMO. I also avoid soy, canola, wheat, (new)cotton (I have many old cotton things). Those crops have been overtaken by GMO at about 98% or higher.

I feel so strongly about making sure what we eat is safe that I would move if alternatives where not available. There are shipping companies like Azure Standard that do drops all over the US. However, by changing what I eat I have made a large impact. By eating very little meat, I have extra money for the organic produce. I buy organic dried beans in bulk, nuts and seeds for my protein intake. I am still eating eggs (mostly in baked goods like pancakes) and ethically, organically raised chicken breast was still on menu last week, but I may be done with that too. I have been gluten/ casein (dairy) and soy free for a few months now and that really limits the possibility of ingesting GMO there. I am also canola free. This means I have no 'spread' for potatoes or rice, but I have learned to like them with coconut oil.


After watching the documentary I quoted yesterday I realize this- the future depends on us not eating animals or their byproducts and learning what 'wild' plants are edible. By learning to ecoharvest and teaching it to our children, we can ensure they will have a means to feed themselves when the bottom falls out for the foods consumed in today's world. By returning to the roots of our nomadic ways we can find a way to adapt to what has been unleashed. I still have an organic garden and still shop at the store. This is a new ideal I have to learn to eat from the wild. I do make pine needle tea in the winter already though for extra vitamin c (one cup has more vitamin c than 5 cups of orange juice)

okay i am rambling now. have a lovely day! learn about indigenous edible plants and educate us all
i don't think it is good advice to say "if it's not labeled organic, don't buy it." Most local producers can't afford to get certified organic by the FDA, and the FDA has watered down their organic standard so much that it doesn't mean what it used to anyway. It is more important to *ask the farmer* about his/her growing practices. Easier to do, of course, at the farmer's market than at the grocery store, but not impossible - the store should be able to tell you where the produce comes from if it is, indeed, local. and then you call the farm and you ask. Where I live, just as an example, there is not a single farmer who sells at the farmer's market who uses any chemical fertilizers or pesticides. but not a single farmer has anything certified organic either. Many, many small farmers do things sustainably and naturally and do not use pesticides or chemical fertilizers. You just have to ask. Most farmers will be thrilled to talk your ear off about how they grow their food, and if they don't want to tell you, then assume they use chemical fertilizers and pesticides and move to the next farmer.

I would personally *much* rather buy local produce that isn't certified (but raised naturally/sustainably) than to buy organic produce from a foreign country - especially because organic doesn't mean the same thing in all countries, and while it would be nice to think that the US polices other countries to make sure they are conforming to our standard, they don't. and that's to say nothing of the amount of fossil fuel required to transport those organic grapes or whatever from Argentina to your super market.

as for consuming meat, it's the same thing. meat itself is not problematic, IMO - we are omnivores and we are meant to consume meat. what we are not meant to consume is meat from animals eating a biologically inappropriate diet (ie ruminants eating corn, chickens eating a vegetarian diet, etc) living in cages on concrete floors with no access to sunlight, fresh air or exercise. these meats are nutritionally void, from animals that would have dropped dead from a litany of diseases had they not been slaughtered for our consumption. and whether you believe in the transfer of energy or karma or not, i personally don't have any desire to eat something that spent its entire life suffering. but depending on where you live, there are often lots of options for buying pastured meat from happy animals eating biologically appropriate diet who spend their lives outdoors where animals should be. and i have absolutely no problem whatsoever eating meat like that. in fact i happily do so on a regular basis.

If you haven't read it, I highly recommend The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan. He talks a lot about how unsustainable industrial agriculture is, and visits Joel Salatin's Polyface farms - a sustainable farm that uses all natural practices, and which is probably the most productive farm by-the-acre in the entire country (if not the world). Salatin's model is what we're trying to do on a smaller scale here on our homestead, and it feels fantastic to slowly but surely become more and more self-sufficient, and to be able to feel completely comfortable eating the meat, eggs, dairy and produce because we grow it ourselves. obviously not everyone can do it themselves, but finding a family farm like ours and supporting it not only speaks loudly against the industrial food chain, it nourishes your family and helps keep local, sustainable agriculture alive and nourishes our planet so that future generations will be able to thrive here too.

for local sources of safe, nourishing food, check out www.eatwild.com www.localharvest.org and www.realmilk.com
post #32 of 55
So HFCS is GMO but fresh corn on the cob that is conventionally grown is not? Is that correct?
And what about grains? Are all grains now GMO? I like to buy my own grains and grind them in the vitamix to make bread and I usually get organic grains, but not always. If it is not organic does that mean it is GMO? That is why they really need a labeling law because I don't know how to know when I am buying it if it is GMO or not.
I also get organic flour to make bread from, but we buy store bought bread as well. I try to avoid breads with HFCS in them but are all the grains in store bought breads bad?
post #33 of 55
Christianmomof3, afaik there is not yet a commonly grown GMO wheat variety on the market, so most of your wheat breads/pasta/etc should be OK still. Virtually all non-organic corn, soy and canola are GMO, which is the #1 reason to buy organic corn/soy/canola, IMO. However, AFAIK there is not a gmo sweet corn yet on the market.

Personally, I buy (and *LOVE*) bread from Rudi's Organic Bakery - we especially love their "Honey Whole Wheat Bread" - its delicious!! Even my DH who's a former white bread lover, loves the stuff and is a happy convert

Honestly, I try to buy organic when it is available, good looking and reasonably priced. If its not, I buy conventional and don't feel too badly. Because, IMHO, eating conventional produce is *FAR* better than simply not eating produce. And while some of you live in big cities and have wonderful whole foods/traders joe/etc to goto for all your organic needs... many of us don't. We garden (not much this year, but usually), we hunt & fish, and order through UNFI co-op/buying club. But I still buy conventional cheese (Cabot actually - for which I am *ecstatic* that its available to me!!), conventional cereal (yes yes yes, I know some of you think this is like 'the devil' but whatever), a mix of conventional WW and organic WW pasta, and various canned goods (mostly organic except for canned fruit - I've been buying sunkist peaches as they come in *GLASS* and are in pear juice!!) among other things.

100% organic is a nice ideal. Unfortuantly due to availability/budget concerns its simply not an achievable goal for most people. Getting up on a high horse and declaring that if you are doing any less you are hurting yourself/your children is really alarmist and totally uneccasary.
post #34 of 55
I am thrilled that there are other people in the world who are concerned about this. I have recently made changes in our diet, and one of the big reasons is to avoid gmos. Sometimes I think I'm the only person in the world who cares. I am not at all smart enough to know much about dna and all the scientific talk, but the bottom line, to me, is that genetically modifying any type of organism is wrong. It goes against nature, and I don't believe it is something God wants us to do.

Pixiepunk, do you have a blog? I would be interested in hearing more of what you are doing on your farm.

I am also finding grocery shopping to be complicated. Sometimes I wonder if I am crazy to even care. I'm doing my best with the funds I have available. I try to remind myself that it's good enough.
post #35 of 55
I am also becoming really concerned the more I learn about this and also more confused. Is anything with corn and soy in it GMO even if it is "organic"? What about Whole Foods 369 brand items that contain soy and corn oil? Is it GMO? What about organic processed foods? Yes I know it is best to stay away from processed foods, but we are not there yet and I think it may be healthier to at least substitute organic ones for non-organic ones as we try to move away from them.
post #36 of 55
If its organic it can't be GMO. If its not organic it almost certainly is gmo - that is unless the corn/soy oil/whatever is specifically labled 'organic' and/or "non-gmo" its gmo.
post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamadelbosque View Post
If its organic it can't be GMO. If its not organic it almost certainly is gmo - that is unless the corn/soy oil/whatever is specifically labled 'organic' and/or "non-gmo" its gmo.
Are you sure? Here in Canada organic certified corn chips ARE gmo! I called several companies and this is what they told me.
post #38 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spirit Dancer View Post
Are you sure? Here in Canada organic certified corn chips ARE gmo! I called several companies and this is what they told me.
Yes, in America organic definitely means non-GMO.
post #39 of 55
Quote:
Honestly I vastly prefer a GM plant that produces a biologically occurring pesticide to one that's been sprayed with a synthetic pesticide.

I don't think it even makes sense to talk about 'GMO food' as some kind of bloc. The safety and utility of the food depends on the gene you put into it.

I think the big concern for most GMO crops is more of an environmental-impact one - eg 'super-crops' resistant to local bugs taking over the local flora - and less of an issue for the health of the consumer.
ITA with this. I am far more concerned about the environmental and logistical consequences of GMO crops than about effects on my health. There is a lot of misinformation being thrown around in this thread.
post #40 of 55
Thread Starter 

An article that has most of the releveant information gathered together

If you still think GMO is safe, If you still eat meat that has been fed GMO, Or if you want to learn as much as you can, read this article.

http://www.naturalnews.com/029325_Mo...deception.html

"In India, animals graze on cotton plants after harvest. But when shepherds let sheep graze on Bt cotton plants, thousands died. Investigators said preliminary evidence "strongly suggests that the sheep mortality was due to a toxin. . . . most probably Bt-toxin."(60) In one small study, all sheep fed Bt cotton plants died; those fed natural plants remained healthy."

If you do not read the above article in its entirety, you are not getting all the facts.

I even went so far as to order organic cotton undies for my toddler. The happenings being allowed are like from a science fiction movie, but its real. I will protect our health and the health of my progeny by staying away from GMO in all facets. They are not safe.

I have been unable to give this thread the scientific jargon I intended to. I feel many are not even reading the links I put up. I cannot fret over it. I am here to wake others up to the danger, what they choose to do with the information is their path.

It is my opinion that is GMO feed is continued to feed the animals of slaughter, they will become extinct in our lifetimes. If GMO is continued, most plants people regard as food will become poison or extinct. I saw a special about GMO trees beginning to be thought of. Ah, here it is... hosted by DAvid Suzuki

http://www.freespeech.org/taxonomy/term/3516/all

I hope to one day read this thread and formulate some posts which will not be thought of as 'stupid' due to my not wording things correctly. I care about you. I used to believe in GMO technology. I used to believe it was necessary to 'feed the masses'. It is not. The masses are not being fed because of completely different reasons, which are related to greed. A species must live within its parameters. Starvation in Africa is directly related to earlier changes made within the country by Europeans. It is inevitable. Feeding a greater population will result in a greater population. (I am rereading Ishmael http://www.pantheist.net/society/ish...ok_review.html .... this is another thread though)

Living with the land instead of against it, trying to conquer it, allows us to have a life of peace. We will return to that way of living. The way of native peoples is the way of living with the land.
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