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Why do women choose inductions when they are healthy and the baby's not near 42 weeks?!!! - Page 3

post #41 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedOakMomma View Post
My friend opted for this, also with her second. She said she was just tired of being pregnant, and wanted the baby to come out. I know it's not best, but with a woman who's already had a vaginal birth it's not nearly as risky, either (from what I've heard, at least). I wouldn't do it, but I don't think it's wrong for other people to make their own decisions about it.
Understanding that I don't know the person referenced by the OP or her specific situation....... the sick-of-pregnancy thing is often cited as a reason; however, don't underestimate the role that OB's can play in turning this into a sales pitch.

"Boy, you must be sick of being pregnant!"
"Wouldn't it be nice to choose your date and get this over with?"

And, as stated by my hairdresser's OB in a really chipper tone of voice, "You know what? You could wait, but....let's just go have a baby! Would you like just go have your baby?"

It works beautifully for the OBs (predictable working hours, allegedly lower liability risk), and they can frame it into a "maternal choice" intervention.
post #42 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galatea View Post
B/c this is MDC and not a mainstream board. If this is not a safe place to discuss less-than-ideal birthing choices, then where is?


Exactly. We are sharing experiences of mainstream OB community, as we try to work through our own thoughts. In fact, if I wouldn't have read these very stories on MDC years ago, I'd likely still be the woman letting OB's choose my future.

I needed to read that there was another way....a natural way...and that I had some kind of power and capability that an OB didn't assign me-God did! I'm thankful, and I hope if anyone ever heard about my first couple of births, that they posted here how ridiculous it was, so people could think!

I can't visit any other board, or even 90%+ pregnancy sites without them being completely mainstream..there is no where else my no-vax'ing, homebirthing, CD'ing, naturally minded choices fit in. I'm thankful for a board that discusses mainstream in a context of other views.

I'm pretty sure we could just gather random OB/hospital data and have the same conversations.

I'm actually someone all for personal and private choices, and I support a woman's right to birth how she wants-I just see the OP's question as one that deserves an answer..and that answer, unfortunately, is that a lot of time the woman isn't informed by her OB, and she's uncomfortable, as I said in my PP on this thread.
post #43 of 62
As a mama who held out against the induction pressure (and believe me there was a HUGE amount of pressure) to go into spontaneous labour with my DD at 43 weeks this trend of early/arbitrary inductions annoys me for a number of reasons.

1) My DD, while technically post-dates, was clearly a term baby - some vernix, little bit of dry skin on hands and feet, 8lb 13oz, and perfectly healthy. If I'd given in and been induced at 40 weeks she would have been at the very least borderline preemie (for her, not by the 'official' standing.

2) OBs who are perfectly happy to induce moms at 37 weeks, despite all the risks that that poses for both mom and baby, should by any 'normal' logic be at least as happy to 'let' moms go to 43 weeks, since both are 3 weeks away from the 'magic' 40 weeks, and as far as I remember both gestation lengths are roughly similar when it comes to perinatal mortality. But instead they start scare-mongering and rarely ever even let moms get to the 42 week/term mark. Oh, the hypocrisy!!

3) You can bet your @ss that the OBs offering/pushing/suggesting induction do not allow the moms fully informed consent. When I was refusing induction at 43 weeks in the hospital I was made to sign a waiver basically declaring that I was aware I was killing my baby by refusing to induce - listing a whole bunch of dreadful things that could happen because of post-maturity. But when I called the OB on it, and asked him if I'd have to sign an equally scary form to consent to induction, listing all the possible side-effects of induction, including c-section, uterine rupture and up to maternal and feotal death - he gave me such a blank look that I was left wondering if he was even aware of the risks of induction.

4) An epidemic of women 'choosing' early/arbitrary induction is unfortunately likely to make it even more difficult for those of us who do our best to choose natural birth routes. If more and more women are induced before or at their due date it will only reinforce this idea that 40 weeks is the 'expiry date' of pregnancy, not simply a rather inaccurate guess at a mean length of gestation.
post #44 of 62
Maybe it's regional, but I've never heard of any OB around here inducing women at 37 weeks with absolutely no medical indication . No matter how sick of being pregnant you are, the OBs here won't induce you without a medical reason before 40 weeks (scheduled c/s are done at 39 weeks). Most of what I hear from "mainstream" women in this area is whining that they want to be induced but the OB won't do it yet (I remember pouting in my OB's office with dd1 because he wouldn't induce me at 40 weeks, back then a whole 9 years ago, you had to be 41 weeks before they'd induce).

It seems like the part of the equation that a lot of people are missing is that most women don't care whether or not they have a "natural" birth, and many don't even care whether or not they have a c/s. So saying "gee, getting induced at 38 weeks for no medical reason statistically increases your odds of medical intervention and c/s" just doesn't mean anything to them. I think saying they're all uneducated or ignorant is unfair; many of them DO know the "risks" involved, they just plain don't care if they have a vacuum assist or ftp or whatever.
post #45 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix23 View Post
You are right, none of us do know this woman, but MDC isn't private and is very, very easy to find, especially for new mothers. Due to the fact that the OP has her home town name displayed right next to her post, it wouldn't be hard for the person she is speaking about to figure out that the post is all about her if she found this. I say this as someone who once stubbled upon a site where someone I knew was talking about me, and despite not using my real name, it didn't take me long to figure out it was me they were talking about. The person being spoken of most likely won't find this, but she could, and I imagine it would be very hurtful. The conversation may be sparked by something in real life, but it is possible to talk about birth practices in general and not individual ones.


And that's the point. No one is saying we can't talk about it in general but why do we need to drag real life people into it?
post #46 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by magstphil View Post


And that's the point. No one is saying we can't talk about it in general but why do we need to drag real life people into it?
The OP could just say "someone I know IRL..." and that should solve the identity issue.
post #47 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by magstphil View Post


And that's the point. No one is saying we can't talk about it in general but why do we need to drag real life people into it?


I know exactly why I chose an induction with dd - I wasn't informed. My doctor gave me the option and I took it. Dd was born at 40w4d. Now I believe that the induction caused her to go into distress and have to go to the NICU for meconium. In one way I am glad that I was induced because her placenta was failing, which was not known until after she was born. She was 5 lbs. 12 oz. and very weak in the beginning. I always wonder what the outcome would have been if we waited. I was more informed with ds and decided that I would not choose to induce unless there was a real medical reason for it. Luckily he was born on his due date.
post #48 of 62
Well, I don't want an induction at all, because I want to do everything possible to avoid a c-section, but I do understand the being sick of being pregnant thing. I think it's a natural way to feel. It can really be a drag to be heavily pregnant. I'm about 31 weeks and am utterly done with the whole scene. I want my body back.

That doesn't mean that I'd asked to be induced though. But I'm not surprised that women feel that way or act on it, especially when doctors are willing to go along. I think I'll skip mentioning my own feelings at my next appointment.
post #49 of 62
Sometimes Its not up to the carrier, with my case, I listen to my doctor, because I am contracted to do so, if he wants to take them at 37 weeks, thats when we do it.
post #50 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediumcrunch View Post
#1- I was 42+ weeks. Ended in C-section when baby went into distress at 5cm. Diagnosed with oligohydramnios. DD was obviously very well baked/overdone.
I'm pregnant with my first now, and was just curious about what that means exactly, a baby being "overdone" (so to speak)? I've heard of premature babies of course but never the flip side, overdone babies.
post #51 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Megan73 View Post
I wouldn't worry except I don't think women are getting enough facts to give truly informed consent.
Let's say a first-time mom asks for an elective induction at 37 weeks. Do most doctors tell her about the risks near-term babies can face? Does he tell her it increase her chance of being sectioned, which carries the risks of a difficult recovery, infection and secondary infertility?I doubt it.
An ethical doctor allows a patient to make her own choice after making sure she understands ALL the risks and benefits.
OMG. Not in my case!
Yesterday, at 40wks 1dy I had a NST & all was OK. They sent me over to someone in the office to 'discuss' induction. The discussion consisted of "we need to schedule you a date to be induced". They wanted to do it at exactly 41wks. I finally gave in to 41wks & 4dys (which is Apr 26th), but I told them I wanted to discuss with DH & especially with a Dr.

I cant believe they were scheduling this A.) so early B.) No medical reason C.) with out a discussion with a DR at all - not even what an induction actually is.
If I was not educated on the subject, I would have absolutely no idea what they would be doing on the 26th. It really is shameful on the Drs part.

(BTW, I do not plan on doing one unless something seems wrong. I have a BPP scheduled on Mon & will talk to the Dr then.)
post #52 of 62
OP you answered your own question: "she just wants him out". That's why.
post #53 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by olien View Post
OMG. Not in my case!
Yesterday, at 40wks 1dy I had a NST & all was OK. They sent me over to someone in the office to 'discuss' induction. The discussion consisted of "we need to schedule you a date to be induced". They wanted to do it at exactly 41wks. I finally gave in to 41wks & 4dys (which is Apr 26th), but I told them I wanted to discuss with DH & especially with a Dr.

I cant believe they were scheduling this A.) so early B.) No medical reason C.) with out a discussion with a DR at all - not even what an induction actually is.
If I was not educated on the subject, I would have absolutely no idea what they would be doing on the 26th. It really is shameful on the Drs part.

(BTW, I do not plan on doing one unless something seems wrong. I have a BPP scheduled on Mon & will talk to the Dr then.)
Good point. I was induced with my first for a very good reason--steadily-worsening pre-eclampsia--and yet my experience with the induction itself was much the same as yours. The OB told me to go to L&D for monitoring and to schedule an induction. When I got there, they led me back to a birthing suite and told me they were going to do the induction then and there! (I actually acquiesced to this, as I had no reason not to--my husband was deployed and I wasn't waiting for anyone to arrive.) There was absolutely zero discussion of risks/benefits. I knew them, but only because I had researched the issue on my own.

And what I am seeing from my friends is much the same as what's been described here. Even before they hit their due date, an induction date is scheduled for two or three days later. One friend who had her daughter last year had to be induced twice, because the first one didn't work. I have another friend who, years ago, wound up with a c-section after something like three or four failed induction attempts, and another who is pregnant now whose doctor has scheduled her for a 38-week c-section because--and I really wish I was making this up--she wound up with a c-section with her first daughter after a failed induction. I have asked a couple of times "Why are you having an induction?" and the answer is always some variant on 'the doctor said so.'

When I was pregnant with my youngest daughter, I remember watching "Birth Day Live" and a doctor declaring that, with advances in ultrasound, there was simply no reason to let nature take its course, because we could tell without error how far along a woman is and that a baby was ready. Of course, here we know that's bull-hockey, but how many women do you think watched that show the same day I did and now repeat it as gospel truth because a doctor said it? It absolutely horrified me, but I bet it relieved at least some women.
post #54 of 62
While there are definitely valid reasons for inductions, yeah there are way too many going on where I feel bad for the mom and baby because I know mom doesn't have all the information she should have to make an informed decision. My experience with OBs is they either expect you to have researched it all yourself and just give you the bare bones information (though they will answer questions when you ask) or they just weigh the risks/rewards as they see it (which is usually skewed towards intervention-heavy) when they give their recommendation. And in the USA, most people think inductions and c-sections are no big deal, which doesn't help anything either.

I love to learn and research, I know I am not normal in this, but it still amazes me that some folks don't get more information about pregnancy/birth and health in general. Doctors generally aren't wellness experts (they focus on what can go wrong and I am glad they do what they do when something is wrong) and a lot of people don't understand that.
post #55 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinalla View Post
While there are definitely valid reasons for inductions, yeah there are way too many going on where I feel bad for the mom and baby because I know mom doesn't have all the information she should have to make an informed decision. My experience with OBs is they either expect you to have researched it all yourself and just give you the bare bones information (though they will answer questions when you ask) or they just weigh the risks/rewards as they see it (which is usually skewed towards intervention-heavy) when they give their recommendation. And in the USA, most people think inductions and c-sections are no big deal, which doesn't help anything either.

I love to learn and research, I know I am not normal in this, but it still amazes me that some folks don't get more information about pregnancy/birth and health in general. Doctors generally aren't wellness experts (they focus on what can go wrong and I am glad they do what they do when something is wrong) and a lot of people don't understand that.
I love this quote. It is so very true. Women line up for their OB ordered tests and inductions and c-sections, and I think most never really question if it is necessary or for the best interest of their individual situation...that was myself included! I remember telling my mother with our third, "I have to have a c-section"..her reply was to ask me why, and for me to tell her that baby's don't come out sideways...so, I had a c-section at 38 weeks for a transverse baby, rather than seeking out alternatives, or waiting until closer to my EDD to make such a drastic decision that set up a future chain of events from @#!*% ! A while later it was "I have to have a c-section with this baby, too"...when asked by her it was "Oh, the OB says that VBAC's are too risky and that's why they aren't allowed at our hospital". Her reply, "Oh".

You are so right about Dr's not being there for wellness promotion! We are so overly medicalized, that so many people go to the Dr for their health questions (as recommended by most mainstream people, internet sites, message boards) and leave without information, or with drugs for a symptom. We have lost the days of sitting with a Dr who will tell us how to become healthy, what supplements and herbs to use, and how instinct and immune support are the key to health. Now we get laughed at by most MD's if we try to discuss an herb/supplement or a natural approach to health and wellness!

Thanks for this point...OB's simply are usually not there to promote wellness and natural living. They are there to promote their control over pregnant women, and for women to say, "OK, well, you ARE the Dr!"
post #56 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by coffeegirl View Post
I'm pregnant with my first now, and was just curious about what that means exactly, a baby being "overdone" (so to speak)? I've heard of premature babies of course but never the flip side, overdone babies.
Postmaturity can't really be diagnosed until after a baby is born.
Signs of postmaturity are: no or little vernix, creases on the baby's palms and soles of feet, dry skin, long finger nails....some may have longer hair and in more severe cases (rarely seen anymore) the skin is stained yellow or green from meconium. In the more severe cases the baby will also seem to have their skin hanging a bit as they have lost weight in utero due to the placenta not functioning as well and they use up the fat stores they had. The placenta also shows signs of aging-some of which can be seen on ultrasound but aren't definitive until observed after birth.
In my experience babies who gestate longer tend to be more alert and have longer spells of quiet and alert too.
The difference between a 37 weeker and a 42 weeker in ease of waking to feed, suck, alertness, head and neck strength etc.....can be really significant. *NOT* saying all 37 weekers are lethargic and all 42 weekers are strong and vigorous but just stating my personal observations.
post #57 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediumcrunch View Post
Postmaturity can't really be diagnosed until after a baby is born.
Signs of postmaturity are: no or little vernix, creases on the baby's palms and soles of feet, dry skin, long finger nails....some may have longer hair and in more severe cases (rarely seen anymore) the skin is stained yellow or green from meconium. In the more severe cases the baby will also seem to have their skin hanging a bit as they have lost weight in utero due to the placenta not functioning as well and they use up the fat stores they had. The placenta also shows signs of aging-some of which can be seen on ultrasound but aren't definitive until observed after birth.
In my experience babies who gestate longer tend to be more alert and have longer spells of quiet and alert too.
The difference between a 37 weeker and a 42 weeker in ease of waking to feed, suck, alertness, head and neck strength etc.....can be really significant. *NOT* saying all 37 weekers are lethargic and all 42 weekers are strong and vigorous but just stating my personal observations.
A lot of this applied to my DS. He had signs of being postmature, even though he was born 40w2d. Absolutely no vernix, anywhere, and very very dry cracky/irritated skin. Poor little one, it took almost a month for the skin on his hands and feet to look soft and normal. DS was 7 Ibs 15 oz, but 2 weeks earlier we were guessing his weight (by feel per midwife, not US) to be around 9 1/2, so I do wonder if he lost weight and if my DD was off. Ds was extremely alert from the get go, and able to hold his head upright from birth. Started breastfeeding within 10 min, perfectly.

I did choose to be induced, by having my membranes stripped 40w1d, but not because we suspected postmaturity. I did it because I had prodromal labor for almost 2 weeks prior, with contractions strong enough to keep me from sleeping. I was so exhausted, and I was planning on having a natural labor, I knew I needed as much energy as I could save. I was fearfull of the prodromal going on much longer, and making me more and more sleep deprived. (natural labor was succesfull btw, but once it started 'moving' finally, took 31 hrs)

I dont regret choosing to have my membranes stripped, my labor was so long and hard (posterior) I dont know if I would have made it through if I had even a few more days of little to no sleep. I also did a lot of researching beforehand (during the prodromal labor) so I knew the risks.

On the other hand, I do know SO MANY women that induce just because they are 'tired of being pregnant' or 'want to see the baby' or bc the OB said they can at 38/39 weeks. Only one of these women had a valid reason (Pre-E) None of the other women I know IRL that chose to do this researched the risks at all, and I know bc I asked them point blank. They thought I was full of BS when I told them they should look further into it, bc anything that an OB says to them is written in gold. One of them had 'proof' of this afterwards, as after she was induced (early, 38w) via Pit, baby went into distress and she was sectioned. Baby spent 4 days in NICU. She made a point of telling me how lucky she was that she had such a great OB that saved her babies life. I just let that go, and said yes, I was very glad the little one was ok, because I was. But you all know what I was thinking.

I'm all for freedom of choice, I just think that if you are taking the responsibility upon yourself to make a choice like this, it should be a responsible informed choice, via doing research/reading etc. Sadly, thats just not the case with most of the people I know.
post #58 of 62
See, and I am regretting NOT doing a natural induction at home, maybe then I would have had a HB and no a c-section. I waited for baby to come naturally (even though I knew he was a big baby b/c my midwife's prediction from touching are eerily accurate), and I went into labor at 42 weeks. He was too big, my hips were not opened enough (despite months of Webster) and he got stuck after the longest labor I've even been at (and I've been at plenty of HBs). I went through hell and back trying to get him out vaginally.

My HBAC will be brought on by a gentle home induction earlier than 42 weeks if baby is following the same growth pattern. I don't want another c-section.
post #59 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Altair View Post
See, and I am regretting NOT doing a natural induction at home, maybe then I would have had a HB and no a c-section. I waited for baby to come naturally (even though I knew he was a big baby b/c my midwife's prediction from touching are eerily accurate), and I went into labor at 42 weeks. He was too big, my hips were not opened enough (despite months of Webster) and he got stuck after the longest labor I've even been at (and I've been at plenty of HBs). I went through hell and back trying to get him out vaginally.

My HBAC will be brought on by a gentle home induction earlier than 42 weeks if baby is following the same growth pattern. I don't want another c-section.
Altair We seem to have a similar story- I was 100% against induction and really heard tons of stories where inductions ended in c sections. I was 100% sure that a body would just do it right on its own and frequently speaking out against inductions! Which I still agree with to a point but- I had a very stressful last few wks of pregnancy. Ended up without midwives- long many times told story.
At any rate- I went to 43 weeks- I knew my dates- and NEVER went into labor! ended up with a c section because my baby actually WAs in distress. He came out kind of hungry and parched and with minor breathing issues that resolved in a day. But it is possible I could have waited past 43 weeks but I was urged that it was urgent. I also in retrps[ect wish I would have gotten induced earlier. But how does one ever know? I think I learned that birth is not really predictable! But my main point is that I agree that inductions are way over used- yet life surprised me by my body not going into labor! strange
post #60 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsTani View Post
I heard my office manager tell one of my other co-workers about one of our other co-workers who is "due" Monday with her second child, a boy, that she's going in to be induced. I asked my office manager about that and she said, well, he's 40 weeks so he's ready, and she's been at 2 cm for two weeks and nothing's happened further, and she just wants him out. After all I have read about how birth naturally happens and what inductions can do, I can't help wondering why an otherwise healthy, somewhat crunchy (vegetarian, but vaxxes) well-educated woman would actually choose induction? I feel like sharing the article http://www.mothering.com/pregnancy-b...inducing-labor with her but I don't know it's my business. I just hope she doesn't wind up with a c/s.
Great article, and very very telling. I wish I had read that before I was induced with my first. With me, it was fear. My OB practice was intervention happy to begin with but they convinced me I had a degrading placenta contributing to intrauterine growth restriction. Despite DD passing every NST and kick count with flying colors I was convinced to be induced at 38 weeks after being constantly told something could be wrong. I gave birth to a very healthy 5 lb 8 oz little girl. Yes she was small but my husband and I are too so I wasn't very surprised and she was very healthy. I totally wish I had waited though. Going through midwives this time and letting DD2 take her time in mommy's belly.
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