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So ... do you vaccinate your pets? - Page 2

post #21 of 46
I'm a certified veterinary technician, and I selectively vaccinate. For instance, Rabies is endemic where i live, many wild animals carry it. We've even had two cases where rabid animals entered a person's home and attacked, once the person, one case their pet. So heck yeah, I'm vaccinating for that, but only every 3 years for my dogs, and yearly using a nonadjuvanted vaccine for my cats. I don't worry about distemper vaccines for the cats, they are indoors and the vaccine doesn't work that well anyway. My dogs get a distemper vaccine about every 5 years. However, i DO vaccinate new puppies for distemper and parvo, because puppies are at the age they are most vulnerable and again, it's VERY common. I see several cases a year of both diseases. We had a client that was very anti vaccine, and was doing rescue, and I watched the puppies die one by one of horrible muscle tremors and seizures...from distemper. Vaccines make sense when the risk of the disease is higher than the risk of the vaccine. It's just a matter of figuring out what those risks are in your area.
post #22 of 46
I have to say, about the heartworm disease, depending on where you are it is VERY easy for dogs to get it. We diagnose at least one case a month where I live. And the treatment for it is VERY toxic compared to the monthly prevention. As for natural remedies, the ones mentioned in that article are not really any better for the dog than the chemical prevention, if you ask me. Pennyroyal is considered toxic, and black walnut is hard on the system for sure, particularly that often. Heartworm prevention is chemical, but considering a dog can eat 10 times their dose and not show a single side effect, I'm fairly comfortable with one pill once a month.

More importantly, those products also have ingredients to worm the dog for hookworm and roundworm, both of which can be transmitted to people. Children are particularly vulnerable to roundworms, and in children they can cause brain damage or blindness. That's not a risk I will take with my kids, when the wormer is so safe.
post #23 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreThanApplesauce View Post
this. we travel several times a year and, as much as we'd like to, we cannot bring the dogs; they HAVE to be boarded. And any boarding kennel around here that is legitimate requires certain vaxes.
Same deal with us. What really frosts my malt is the bordetella vaccine. Good grief. It's. A. Cold. Nothing more. My dog had it when we adopted him from the shelter. Antiobiotics and time were all it took to cure him.

I guess I can understand requiring the vax so that the kennel cough doesn't spread to dogs in more vulnerable health. But there's no way we'll ever get this as a routine vaccination. We just get it at the eleventh hour before we travel.
post #24 of 46
OTOH, I have relatives who live on the edge of the wilderness, outside of any jurisdiction; they do not vaccinate their animals, including their dogs.

Their dogs are fine, after many years. IF any animal would get rabies, it would be their dogs since they live so close to many wild animals, and yet, they do not - why?
post #25 of 46
We only vax our dogs for rabies because if something were to happen and they would bite someone and we don't have proof of rabies vax, they destroy the animal.
post #26 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by caned & able View Post
OTOH, I have relatives who live on the edge of the wilderness, outside of any jurisdiction; they do not vaccinate their animals, including their dogs.

Their dogs are fine, after many years. IF any animal would get rabies, it would be their dogs since they live so close to many wild animals, and yet, they do not - why?
Rabid animals who have lots of "wilderness" to claim as territory are less likely to come into contact with your pet.

I live in a densely populated area....Rhode Island is the second most densely populated state in the country. We also have tons of skunks, raccoons, coyotes (even in the streets of Providence), black bears, and possums. If any were rabid, they would be much more likely to come into contact with domestic creatures than if they were out in the boonies.
post #27 of 46
Also...just a PSA....

If you live in an area where heartworm is prevalent, just be aware that cats can be infected, too. There is no cure for heartworm in cats. You basically treat the inflammation and wait for the worms to die, which can take years. And yes, indoor cats can get heartworm, since it's transmitted by mosquitoes.

My 14yo kitty is a heartworm survivor. She will likely be on Prednisone for the rest of her life.
post #28 of 46
My dogs had the core vaccines (parvo/distemper/adeno) as puppies before I had them.
As adults, rabies vax only every three years.
post #29 of 46
It angers me that every county is different. I wish we could only do the rabies every 3 years. But our county mandates every year or you lose your dog's license and they take the pet (which again, makes NO sense to me. Lets take pets to an overpopulated shelter and then kill them). Gah. Makes my head want to explode.
post #30 of 46
No vax and no heartworm meds here.
post #31 of 46
nope didnt vax my cat and when i went to get her spayed. i had to lie to get around it i told them that i had just had her given to me and she was up to date on her shots. she is a outdoor/indoor cat.
post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktgrok View Post
Rabies is endemic where i live, many wild animals carry it. We've even had two cases where rabid animals entered a person's home and attacked, once the person, one case their pet. So heck yeah, I'm vaccinating for that, but only every 3 years for my dogs, and yearly using a nonadjuvanted vaccine for my cats.
Question for you.... why don't you use the 3-year rabies vax for the cats? Do all the 3-year rabies vaxes have adjuvants? And how would I go about finding out how to get a non-adjuvant vax for my cat? Usually they just give whatever they have, don't they?

At our vet's, it used to be a 3-year vax, then last time I took her they switched to a 1-year vax. I thought it was some kind of gimmick to get the cats back in every year (and pay for another vet visit every year, whether you need it or not). Personally, I'd rather not have to do this more than once every 3 years.
post #33 of 46
we board ours cuz we travel often, so we have too but we dont do it unless we are sure we are going somewhere... poor babies.
post #34 of 46
I selectively vax my cats and dogs. I think the risk of parvo and distemper for my dogs is real and more serious than the vaccine side effects. I update them every 3-5 years, depending on whether they're boarding. I do rabies in my dogs as required by law, since they're city dogs who are constantly out and about.

I vaccinated my cats when they were young, and not since then. They're mostly indoors.

KimPM: If it's the 1-year non-adjuvanted rabies vaccine by Merial (PureVax) it is definitely preferable to any of the adjuvanted options. For many cats it is the adjuvants that can cause bad reactions. My understanding is that they're working on getting it approved for a 3-year vaccine.
post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2xy View Post
Rabid animals who have lots of "wilderness" to claim as territory are less likely to come into contact with your pet.
... If any were rabid, they would be much more likely to come into contact with domestic creatures than if they were out in the boonies.


O.K.

IF wild animals have so much wilderness territory to claim then why do they come onto my relative's property to bother and eat the chickens and other animals who are outside and available? Animals do not know from property lines or property rights. And after over ten years of wilderness living, these dogs and pets have only died from old age in their sleep after 15-20 years of life, not hydrophobia OR some VPD.
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticmomma View Post
We only vax our dogs for rabies because if something were to happen and they would bite someone and we don't have proof of rabies vax, they destroy the animal.
Thats why we chose to get our dog the rabies shot. She jumps the fence sometimes and if she bites someone, I want to show them that she was at least vaccinated for rabies. Plus we go on lots of hikes in the woods where she runs freely and chases animals. I dont plan on getting her the shot every year, more like every 2 or so years.
post #37 of 46
No and no heartworm pills either.

However, my dogs are very much indoor dogs, they are tiny so they get all the exercise they need indoors. When we travel, we hire a professional petsitter to do overnights at our house. Under these circumstances, it's not a difficult choice.
post #38 of 46
Im a vet tech and we see a parvo case at least once a week, imof since i have been there we have had 5 puppies die of parvo. AND we i have seen personally 7 dogs be diagnosed with heartworms in the last 2 months.

I understand not wanting to put unnecessary toxins in your animals, however, you should be really really certain about the transmission of these viruses, and know when the vax are necessary. A 4 month old puppy that goes on walks or has other pets as neighbors should have their DHLPPC shot, and all animals should get heartworm prevention, just like flea and tick prevention.
post #39 of 46
My vet is a homoeopath, and has a very strict policy of not over vaccinating, so when he tells me I need to get a certain vaccine, I do it. The only ones he is adamant are the Lyme vaccine, distemper and rabies. The rabies he will only do every three years (except for that first year). In order to licence your dog in my city, you must have a valid rabies certificate. I licence my dog because its the law, and because I see it as part of being a responsible pet owner.

The few times I've boarded the dog and have needed the bordatella vaccine, the vet's given it only after ranting about how ineffective it is, and asking if I really have to go on vacation.

I do give heartworm meds because, as someone already mentioned, the treatment is so much worse than the preventative.

Ironically, the reason I decided not to vaccinate my child is BECAUSE the vet told me about how detrimental over vaccinating is to dogs. I started looking into it, and decided that if it was bad for my dog, it was probably bad for my baby too.
post #40 of 46
Oh- and just because its interesting:

o deworm her animals, my aunt (who owns an herb farm over run with cats to control the mice and chipmunks) swears by horseradish root- she allows it to root in their water bowl, and maintains that it works to get rid of the worms. (not heartworm- just the other intestinal parasites.) I can't find any written documentation of this method, nor can I say it works from experience- my dog won't leave it alone long enough for it to root- he likes to eat it.
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