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Should we keep going with this or make a change? (gymnastics--long) - Page 2

post #21 of 40
We have struggled with this a bit too, for many of the same reasons. My now 7 YO DD started gymnastics at 3 and is very good. Maybe not quite as good as your DD, but far outstripping her age group and moved up in class level so that now she is mostly with older girls (9-13) as well. There was definitely a time when she was the youngest/smallest in her class and it was harder. She is also ADHD (professionally diagnosed, not just my suspicion). So I've seen a lot of exactly the sort of thing that you are describing.

We moved her out of the YMCA program when both her coaches and we realized she was ready to move up but they couldn't let her go beyond her age bracket with their system. The gym we chose let her move up by ability, without restriction by age. However, they have always been careful to put her in classes where there were more younger girls than older ones. There is a world of "socialization" difference between school aged and non-school-aged children! We have limited her class time to 1 hr/lesson so that she didn't have quite so much standing around/waiting stuff. I cannot imagine DD actually being able to hold it together for a full 2 hour class, especially on a school day. We tend to concentrate on Saturday classes so that she isn't so tired for class, though we have recently added a second hour on Wednesday afternoons. We made sure she was never in a class with more than 4 other girls so that the coach could adequately supervise both the girls working on skills and those waiting.

Then we took the biggest step and the one that has helped the most. Because the ADHD was interfering with both school and gymnastics progress, we sought professional diagnosis and treatment. While somewhat unpopular here at MDC, the right ADHD medication has made the world of difference in her ability to manage both school and the gym. Virtually all of her social interaction issues and attention issues disappeared at that point. Next week she is joining the demo team (our gym does not competitive gymnastics until level 5 and she's a 3).

All of which is a long way to recommend finding a different program but not leaving the sport. It sounds like she enjoys it, other than this current difficulty. I would suggest maybe short, smaller classes and a gym that might have more advanced but younger girls that she can be with.

It also sounds like the right daycamp or preschool program this summer might be really good, especially if she isn't doing that now. There is something about learning social skills that takes practice, especially for children who have different perceptions of the world. Of course, you may be already doing that, but I can't tell. If you do add something else, you might want to look for a small enough group size that the teacher/councelor can coach social skills (something that a gymnastics coach can't do) within the group.
post #22 of 40
I haven't read the whole thread, so please forgive me if I'm repeating someone else's suggestions.

It sounds like social issues really are the problem here. What if your dd did one group class with her age group each week, and one private lesson with just a coach to keep working on improving her skills? If it's not too much more expensive, that might let your dd be where she needs to be both in terms of her social skills and her abilities.

If that's too expensive, and your dd wants to continue gymnastics, I wouldn't hesitate to put her back in the younger age group. Coaches at the gym where my dd goes are very good at differentiating for kids within a group - they work on perfecting the skills the other kids are learning, and can add skills in a lot of situations.
post #23 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan&Anna's_Mom View Post
Then we took the biggest step and the one that has helped the most. Because the ADHD was interfering with both school and gymnastics progress, we sought professional diagnosis and treatment. While somewhat unpopular here at MDC, the right ADHD medication has made the world of difference in her ability to manage both school and the gym.
Good for you!

My older DD has high functioning a-typical autism. I deeply believe that we owe it to our special needs kids to take their needs very seriously by getting them what they need to be successful.

My DD just started a social skills class to work on those skills that most kids just figure out but that she needs to be taught in a ordered way.
post #24 of 40
My son will be 5 at the end of this month and has also done gymnastics for a long time. He's very good, and he's in the show team this year (3x a week for 90 minutes). He was two year younger than the youngest person on the team, mostly composed of 6-7yo, when he started last sept. Our gym also had a younger show team composed of 3-4yo which isn't as fierce.

The problem to me doesn't seem to be the gymastics, it seems to be that your daughter is stressed out with all the demands on her, and she's still only 4.5. The other girls on the team are being appropriate for acting like they are 6, and most likely are frustrated with her (very age appropriate) inability to hold still, wait for her turn, stay in her space, etc. I would either find another gym, even if it means moving down a level, that's appropriate to her maturity and social ability at this time. She's only 4.5, you have ages and ages to go if she really wants to go far with her gymnastics.

Another option is finding another high-energy sport for her to participate in, if she is craving the physicality of gymnastics. Maybe dance, or tai kwon do. I also think a class in manners or appropriate behaviors would be good for her to take as well.
post #25 of 40
Thread Starter 
Thanks all for your insights and suggestions. I made some changes in dd's diet a couple of weeks ago, and already, I see a difference in her. And her behavior isn't horrible or disruptive to the class in general. On the contrary, she often gets points (they have a point reward system) for working hard, listening to the teacher and following directions--several times when no other girl in the class does. It really is a social skills thing--not understanding boundaries and wanting too badly to be liked, and not knowing how to deal with rejection and mean behavior from other kids (it's disappointing to me, though, that so many people--not necessarily here-- think telling another kid "I hate you," "go away" is a normal part of growing up and learning social skills).

So, there are 4 more classes this month. I'm just going to try to help dd get through these classes. Then we'll take a break and take some time looking for another gym. Maybe a lot of time to give dd a chance to mature a bit. She's a funny one--so articulate and charming with adults, reading on at least a second grade level, amazing with smaller kids and pets, but has so much difficulty reading social cues and knowing how to be part of a group. I'm terrified for kindergarten.

You know, I'm just really exhausted. I feel as though over the years we have put and still are putting so much time, energy, money, stress into getting things better for my girl. From surgeries to therapies to special diets....I'm just tired, and I wish there were an easy button I am going to put my dd in some camp this summer, most likely at the school she will attend in the fall. We will also have her formally evaluated in about a month if we can not get an earlier appointment.
post #26 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alathia View Post

The problem to me doesn't seem to be the gymastics, it seems to be that your daughter is stressed out with all the demands on her, and she's still only 4.5. The other girls on the team are being appropriate for acting like they are 6, and most likely are frustrated with her (very age appropriate) inability to hold still, wait for her turn, stay in her space, etc. I would either find another gym, even if it means moving down a level, that's appropriate to her maturity and social ability at this time. She's only 4.5, you have ages and ages to go if she really wants to go far with her gymnastics.

Another option is finding another high-energy sport for her to participate in, if she is craving the physicality of gymnastics. Maybe dance, or tai kwon do. I also think a class in manners or appropriate behaviors would be good for her to take as well.
So yesterday was dd's last gymnastics class. I feel already that it was the right decision. I think a 2 hour class is too long for her. This past Monday we tried a comparable class at a closer gym. At about 1.5 hours into it, the coach told me she was complaining of being tired and lying down on the mats. I think her patience and her performance deteriorates the longer she's in there. When I talked to her coach about taking her out, the coach said that she didn't understand why, and that she thought dd had improved so much.....Then yesterday another coach tells me after class how much dd acted up. DD had a fit as the coach tried to tell me. She screamed at the coach to stop telling me--She cannot stand being told that she is wrong or having her wrongdoings exposed. She even hit and kicked at the coach. I was so embarassed and angry. Usually dd is super well-behaved with teachers and instructors. I think the class has been stressful for her. I don't know if it is that stress that is making her act up, the length of the class, immaturity, problems with the other girls, imitating the other girls, her age, or a combination of things. DD's always been "spirited," but I know she's been more difficult overall--even at home since moving from the 1 hour to the 2 hour class.

So next week we are going to start at the other gym--a one hour a week, recreational, co-ed trampoline class. Also, this gym is 5 minutes from our house, whereas the other is almost 30 so I don't have to worry about her falling asleep in the car before we even get to the gym,and being tired to start out. I'm hoping this is a better fit for dd so that she can still be in a gym and have less pressure so we can work on some of her behavioral stuff.

ETA: Out of curiosity...several of you who have posted on this thread have suggested swimming as a sport for dd. If any of you out there are still reading, may I ask why? Dh and I were discussing how well-behaved and calm dd has always been in swim class (she's a very good swimmer and has been taking 30 minute, once a week lessons for about a year now). There are other kids, waiting, taking turns, following directions, etc., but she is a different kid in that class than in gymnastics. Hmmm...
post #27 of 40
No idea about the personality stuff and swimming, but swimming is a great complement to gymnastics.

Of all the girls that start a developmental / pre-team track (and are level 2 at ages 4-6), probably less than 1% will still be doing gymnastics at age 14.

But while gymnastics is "high demand" young, the kids that swim clubs are bringing along to be the next Michael Phelps will have low demands placed on them young. They will be expected to swim 2-3 times a week for maybe an hour until as late as puberty. They are expected to get their feel for the water young and work on nice stroke technique. There's no competition pressure. Meanwhile childhood gymnastics has lots of competition pressure, and 8-10 hours a week at practice. They get to age 10 or so, and time to admit that for whatever reason they are not going to move toward 24 hours a week of gymnastics in level 8. They switch from USAG to prep-op or JOGA or school cheerleading, have fun in the gym 6 hours a week while they ramp up their swimming, and then maybe from that to competing gymnastics for their high schools only.

Swimming is a lifelong sport. Gymnastics may be a lifelong love, but not something you can do 3 hours a week for fitness at age 40. Ouch.

As to your situation, OP, if the tramp class goes well, maybe get a bar at home so she doesn't lose her pullover, and take a year off of artistic. Or do one tramp a week and one artistic gymnastics private a week so she can re-join her group later and either get her a bar and a folding mat at home for practice or take her once a week to an open gym. She should be able to re-join her group later, or catch up reasonably. I think it can be discouraging to lose the upper body though. That bar strength can take a while for the kids to get back unless they are naturally super strong for weight.

I also think sometimes it's just time to move on to another level 2 group ... those girls should recognize that she is 4.5 and not be harsh with her. I have a six year old in level 2 and if she was mean to your daughter for what you describe, I would do what I needed to do to make it stop. It's not acceptable. If the culture is "let the kids work it out themselves," well I'll say that is more likely to work with boys than girls. I don't like it when a 7 year old boy shoves my 5 year old off the tumble track. I would prefer the 7 year old recognize that my son is 5. On the other hand, he'll eventually learn, and the 7 year old will not continue to torment him. I can't say the same about typical girl relations.
post #28 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by naismama View Post
ETA: Out of curiosity...several of you who have posted on this thread have suggested swimming as a sport for dd. If any of you out there are still reading, may I ask why? Dh and I were discussing how well-behaved and calm dd has always been in swim class (she's a very good swimmer and has been taking 30 minute, once a week lessons for about a year now). There are other kids, waiting, taking turns, following directions, etc., but she is a different kid in that class than in gymnastics. Hmmm...
if she's a good swimmer, get her on a team. There is FAR more swimming and far less waiting around. In gymnastics, kids spend most of their time standing around and waiting. During a swim team practice, kids spend most of their time swimming.

Gymnastics as a team sport has a high rate of injury and a high rate of eating disorders. Swimming, on the other hand, is one of the best things you can do for your body. (Both my kids did recreational gymnastics when they were young, but it isn't something that I would have supported as a team sport).

It is also my experiences that swim coaches have a higher rate of having an attitude of helping each child their their potential than most sports. It really is about "personal best" and not about beating other people.

AND swimming (real swimming) requires controlled breathing. Controlling our breathing is a pivotal step to control our emotions. In this respect, it's very like yoga.
post #29 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post
No idea about the personality stuff and swimming, but swimming is a great complement to gymnastics.

Of all the girls that start a developmental / pre-team track (and are level 2 at ages 4-6), probably less than 1% will still be doing gymnastics at age 14.

But while gymnastics is "high demand" young, the kids that swim clubs are bringing along to be the next Michael Phelps will have low demands placed on them young. They will be expected to swim 2-3 times a week for maybe an hour until as late as puberty. They are expected to get their feel for the water young and work on nice stroke technique. There's no competition pressure. Meanwhile childhood gymnastics has lots of competition pressure, and 8-10 hours a week at practice. They get to age 10 or so, and time to admit that for whatever reason they are not going to move toward 24 hours a week of gymnastics in level 8. They switch from USAG to prep-op or JOGA or school cheerleading, have fun in the gym 6 hours a week while they ramp up their swimming, and then maybe from that to competing gymnastics for their high schools only.

Swimming is a lifelong sport. Gymnastics may be a lifelong love, but not something you can do 3 hours a week for fitness at age 40. Ouch.

As to your situation, OP, if the tramp class goes well, maybe get a bar at home so she doesn't lose her pullover, and take a year off of artistic. Or do one tramp a week and one artistic gymnastics private a week so she can re-join her group later and either get her a bar and a folding mat at home for practice or take her once a week to an open gym. She should be able to re-join her group later, or catch up reasonably. I think it can be discouraging to lose the upper body though. That bar strength can take a while for the kids to get back unless they are naturally super strong for weight.

I also think sometimes it's just time to move on to another level 2 group ... those girls should recognize that she is 4.5 and not be harsh with her. I have a six year old in level 2 and if she was mean to your daughter for what you describe, I would do what I needed to do to make it stop. It's not acceptable. If the culture is "let the kids work it out themselves," well I'll say that is more likely to work with boys than girls. I don't like it when a 7 year old boy shoves my 5 year old off the tumble track. I would prefer the 7 year old recognize that my son is 5. On the other hand, he'll eventually learn, and the 7 year old will not continue to torment him. I can't say the same about typical girl relations.
Thanks, for this response. You know, I had no intention of making gymnastics "her sport." It was something we were doig for fun and to get her energy out, and before I knew it we were on this developmental track. Several times over the past 2 months in the level 2 class dd has asked for Coach ---, the kindergym coach. I think gymnastics had stopped being fun for her. I'm so glad we quit!

The gym where we will do the tramp class offers a FREE noon-hour open gym for preschoolers, so she'll have the opportunity to work on other things, although I suspect she'll just want to jump on the tramp.

As for the social stuff, it was really disappointing how mean these girls are, but it won't be the last time, and it will have to serve as a strating point to teach my dd assertiveness, self-control, and kindness toward those who are different or younger than she.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
if she's a good swimmer, get her on a team. There is FAR more swimming and far less waiting around. In gymnastics, kids spend most of their time standing around and waiting. During a swim team practice, kids spend most of their time swimming.

Gymnastics as a team sport has a high rate of injury and a high rate of eating disorders. Swimming, on the other hand, is one of the best things you can do for your body. (Both my kids did recreational gymnastics when they were young, but it isn't something that I would have supported as a team sport).

It is also my experiences that swim coaches have a higher rate of having an attitude of helping each child their their potential than most sports. It really is about "personal best" and not about beating other people.

AND swimming (real swimming) requires controlled breathing. Controlling our breathing is a pivotal step to control our emotions. In this respect, it's very like yoga.
Interesting, thanks. She's actually got 4 strokes, but is not at a high enough level to be on the team at her swim school. She will soon, though. one of the things her vision and physical therapists always try to get her to do is RELAX. It seems like the things that really help her do that are art, music, and swimming. I gotta find a way to get this girl swimming more!
post #30 of 40
The other reason swimming is good for kids with lots of energy is that it gives proprioceptive feedback to the whole body. Kids who get 'in trouble' for crashing into other kids often need more help figuring out where their bodies are in space, and swimming helps that. And it tires them out!
post #31 of 40
Oh, that's so sad! I feel bad for her. I bet it hurts her feelings.

My daughter tried gymnastics, but had a hard time waiting her turn, and it stopped being fun.

She was also in dance class, which seemed easier on her. So, I put her in a tumbling class in her dance studio. SHE LOVED IT. It was all she thought about, all she wanted to do. I even got a phone call from the principal of her school when she was in kindergarten saying that whenever she is supposed to be WALKING down the halls that she does cartwheels instead. All the time.

The tumbling obsession lasted til fifth grade when it was taken over by a tap dancing obession.

We also moved from one dance studio where she couldn't make friends, to another one where she made lots of friends. It wasn't the studio... it was just that particular group of kids. She made friends at the second studio, and she's kept them for 12 years. Every August, when it was time to sign up for classes, they would get together to make sure they were always in the same class.

Sometimes, it isn't the school, or your child. You might need to keep trying new places til she finds her niche. Everybody has one.. you just need to find it.
post #32 of 40
Swimming relaxes me too! I LOVE swimming!

Definitely get her on a team - there really is tons and tons of swimming happening during a team practice (with laps you just wait until the person in front of you is far enough ahead that you won't run into them, and the order is usually based on people's speed). It's a great sport, and really really fun!!
post #33 of 40
There is another aspect to swimming that might appeal to your daughter. I was talking to a lady whose daughter started doing competitive gymnastics at a very young age, and when she turned 14 years old, decided to stop because she didn't want to move into the ultra competitive sphere. (Not sure what the proper term is.) She still wanted to be active, so she decided to go out for a high school sport. She chose diving. Boy did the swim/diving team just eat her up. All of her natural aptitude and years of disciplined training just clicked right in because the skills are complimentary. It is apparently very unusual to have a freshman in varsity diving, but she did fantastic. Maybe your daughter might eventually like to do diving.
post #34 of 40
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all of the responses re: swimming. Usually dh takes her to weekly lessons, but yesterday, I did. I was absolutely at how different she is in that class than in gymnastics. I told my husband, and he said it's that way all the time. She was calm...CALM. Patient--there are always 2 or 3 other kids in the class, so there is an element of waiting. She looked agreeable, and she looked so HAPPY. That's what got me the most. I mean she was all smiles. She took instruction from the teacher, and looked proud of her acheivements. She was liek a totally different kid. Only when I watched that class did I realize that she hardly ever smiled in gymnastics--it makes me sad to think about. So I'm pretty sure we made the right decision by pulling her out. If after a while, she misses artistic, I can try it out at the new gym.


Quote:
Originally Posted by emilysmama View Post
There is another aspect to swimming that might appeal to your daughter. I was talking to a lady whose daughter started doing competitive gymnastics at a very young age, and when she turned 14 years old, decided to stop because she didn't want to move into the ultra competitive sphere. (Not sure what the proper term is.) She still wanted to be active, so she decided to go out for a high school sport. She chose diving. Boy did the swim/diving team just eat her up. All of her natural aptitude and years of disciplined training just clicked right in because the skills are complimentary. It is apparently very unusual to have a freshman in varsity diving, but she did fantastic. Maybe your daughter might eventually like to do diving.
You know, she can't do any kind of diving team or lessons until 6, so that will be late next summer. But we've always felt she'd love diving and excel at it. She's the only kid in her gymnastics class who will go across the monkey bars 12 feet up then do a forward tumble into the pit . She's been doing that since she was 3, and also flips on the trampoline. We will definitely keep diving in mind for her as she gets older!
post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by naismama View Post
You know, she can't do any kind of diving team or lessons until 6, so that will be late next summer. But we've always felt she'd love diving and excel at it. She's the only kid in her gymnastics class who will go across the monkey bars 12 feet up then do a forward tumble into the pit . She's been doing that since she was 3, and also flips on the trampoline. We will definitely keep diving in mind for her as she gets older!
I know this is controversial, but can't she just swim? I mean the idea of "no diving team until she's 6" is a bit unnerving to me, and I'm pretty flexible on kids being involved in activities. It seems that gymnastics got away from you until you were spending hours driving and having her unhappy in class, but no one noticed because she was "advanced."

Now you've realized that, and I think it's wonderful all around. I just don't see the need to jump into a diving or swimming team. She can just swim in the pool & have fun. I'm afraid you'd head right back into the same path where you really don't know if she likes it because swim team just becomes your life.

Really, does she have to decide at 4 or 5 what she wants her "thing" to be? As I said, my intention isn't to be harsh. My children are in organized activities as I was from an early age. I don't mind the concept, but I think it can become too much.
post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionaryMom View Post
I know this is controversial, but can't she just swim? ...
Really, does she have to decide at 4 or 5 what she wants her "thing" to be? As I said, my intention isn't to be harsh. My children are in organized activities as I was from an early age. I don't mind the concept, but I think it can become too much.
I totally get where you are coming from and sort of agree with you, but....


Quote:
Originally Posted by naismama View Post
DD has strabismus which means that she sees and moves through the world differently than most kids. I also suspect that if evaluated, she might be considered ADHD. She jumps around a lot and has trouble not invading the other girls' personal space. She gets too close to them, has trouble keeping her place in line, sometimes cuts, etc.

I really think that swimming could be theraputic for her. It is fantasic for getting the hang of where you are in space and intense swimming is oddly relaxing (like a runners high).

Really high energy kids are often best behaved when they get LOTS of activity. If she were my child, I'd really push to get her on a summer swim team this year. She'd most likely practice 45 min. a day, 4 days a week, and have some swim meets where she'd spend most of her time hanging out with her new friends eating snacks from the snack bar (my kids LOVED meets). She'd most likely have a blast. The usual requirement is to be able to swim the length of the pool 1 time in one of the four competitive strokes. Check out your city parks and rec programs.

And summer swimming is nice because it has an end date. It's not like gynmastics that just keeps going and going and going.
post #37 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionaryMom View Post
I know this is controversial, but can't she just swim? I mean the idea of "no diving team until she's 6" is a bit unnerving to me, and I'm pretty flexible on kids being involved in activities. It seems that gymnastics got away from you until you were spending hours driving and having her unhappy in class, but no one noticed because she was "advanced."

Now you've realized that, and I think it's wonderful all around. I just don't see the need to jump into a diving or swimming team. She can just swim in the pool & have fun. I'm afraid you'd head right back into the same path where you really don't know if she likes it because swim team just becomes your life.

Really, does she have to decide at 4 or 5 what she wants her "thing" to be? As I said, my intention isn't to be harsh. My children are in organized activities as I was from an early age. I don't mind the concept, but I think it can become too much.
I understand what you're saying, but your assessment of our situation is not quite right.....gymnastics never really "got away from us." DD is a kid with a lot of heart. She is not the kind of kid to come home and cry because she doesn't like something; she's not a complainer (not that there's anything wrong at all with kids crying, just that I had to pull, I mean pull it out of her that things weren't quite right in gymnastics). She almost seems oblivious sometimes, just going about what she thinks it is she is supposed to be doing. I've had my eye on this the whole time, and dh and I have had many discussions about it. It's not like I just cluelessly kept my child in a bad situation, content that she was "advanced." Some children are just harder to read--even for their own parents.

Why is it "unnerving" that I would consider diving/ swimming team or lessons for my daughter? She is a very active child who is not in preschool. Our aim is to give her a physical outlet and get her around other kids so that she can make some friends. I have found that, where I live, that is best done in organized activities done consistently. We have a pool at home and she has plenty of opportunity to "just swim"!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post


I really think that swimming could be theraputic for her. It is fantasic for getting the hang of where you are in space and intense swimming is oddly relaxing (like a runners high).

Really high energy kids are often best behaved when they get LOTS of activity. If she were my child, I'd really push to get her on a summer swim team this year. She'd most likely practice 45 min. a day, 4 days a week, and have some swim meets where she'd spend most of her time hanging out with her new friends eating snacks from the snack bar (my kids LOVED meets). She'd most likely have a blast. The usual requirement is to be able to swim the length of the pool 1 time in one of the four competitive strokes. Check out your city parks and rec programs.

And summer swimming is nice because it has an end date. It's not like gynmastics that just keeps going and going and going.
Yes. Where we live, a summer swim "team" is the best bet to get her swimming regularly. I don't even think a lot of the teams are competitive. And I do think swimming is very relaxing to her. I've had several therapists comment on dd's "anxiety," "rigidity," or "needing to relax." If there is a sport/ activity that helps to release some of that for her and get her some social interaction, I'm all for it, as long as she is enjoying herself.
post #38 of 40
Around here, if my kid wants to try anything cool on the diving board he will have to be with a diving coach. Culture shift attempts to remove all danger except obesity and diabetes.

I do wonder what effect it would have had on my kids to not be able to train swimming and gymnastics from an early age. I grew up in the country without opportunity so I was "just" swimming and trying to do tricks in the tall grass. I think the answer is that they would be kids who are pretty much the same but without a lot of cool skills and with less plug-in to the community.

I think it's just a different mindset that probably is based on one's own childhood memories and the experience of our own kids' way of being. Some people would think nothing of 15 hours a week of preschool for a 4-5 year old but think 6 hours a week of gymnastics is too much. I think it depends on the kids. Some little kids will do better in the same amount of time in the gym than being in preschool.
post #39 of 40
Thread Starter 

update

So we just got back from dd's first co-ed "trampoline and tumbling" class at the gym near our home. Dd says she loved it! She said the kids were "much, much nicer" and she liked having a "boy coach because boy coaches are fun." The coach said she was at times distracted and had to be "brought back," but he also said her behavior was not very different from the other kids her age he coaches. He also said she really seems to want to get it right and do a good job. It is a developmental class (not recreational), so we'll have to keep an eye on it, but since she's young, it would be a long time before she got moved up. Plus, she only has to go once a week for an hour. So hopefully this works. Thanks again for all the insights.

--naismama
post #40 of 40
I'm so glad to hear that it went well!

Trampoline is FUN!
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