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Military Moms: May - June - Page 2

post #21 of 517
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatieJD View Post
Nope, just have to have ID. I think there are 4 or 5 gates that you can go through as long as you have ID.
Civilian or military ID? Now that you mention it, I remember thinking the security at the gate on the Army base in HI was less strict than at the Marine Corps base. All the Marine Corps bases I've been to require either a military ID or a military sponsor to get on base.
post #22 of 517
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarineWife View Post
Civilian or military ID? Now that you mention it, I remember thinking the security at the gate on the Army base in HI was less strict than at the Marine Corps base. All the Marine Corps bases I've been to require either a military ID or a military sponsor to get on base.
Just a civilian ID and quick car inspection, they just have a different lane for them than those who have military ID and DoD stickers.
post #23 of 517
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatieJD View Post
Just a civilian ID and quick car inspection, they just have a different lane for them than those who have military ID and DoD stickers.
Oh, hm. Why would a non-military person want to come on the base if not to see a specific person? We have a beach here that they might like to visit but they still need a military sponsor to get there.
post #24 of 517
i have a non military friend who likes to use the walking track on base and take her kids to the playground. her hubby is a civilian who works on base though, so that may be part of the draw for them. *shrug*
post #25 of 517
Yeah, I think if you are a civilian who works on base your family would have more access. My neighbor's dh works on base so they can shop at the Commissary and such. It's just scary that some random person could get on the base for no particular reason. I do think military bases should be more safe than the public communities.
post #26 of 517
Thread Starter 
Fort Bragg is pretty big, I'm sure there are many reasons why people go on post. You're right that it should be safer, unfortunate that things like this happen.
post #27 of 517
That's odd...when I went on Ft. Lewis in a vehicle w/out stickers, but w/military ID, a couple of years ago I had to get a temporary pass before going through the gate. I wonder if it's different b/c that was a few years ago or if each army base has different standards. Every USMC base I've ever been on has required an ID and stickers or a temporary pass.
post #28 of 517
Thread Starter 
They may actually issue a temporary day pass, I don't really know what they do exactly but I do know all they require is an ID and quick car inspection. The whole things takes a minute or two and then they're on to the next car.
post #29 of 517
No, I mean the temp pass where you have to go in w/insurance, registration, and military ID...usually w/a long line!
post #30 of 517
It's very fast here in HI, too. Show your ID (military OR civilian), get waved through. There have been times I've left my purse by accident, had NO ID whatsoever, and been let on post, no questions asked. It's scary how lax security has gotten.

Oh, I suppose an intro would be nice - I'm Jen, wife to an Army officer, currently deployed. I'm in Hawaii with my 5 kiddos.
post #31 of 517
Thread Starter 
DH and I were talking about this last night and really couldn't come up with any plausible reasons why there aren't tighter restrictions. Even people whose spouse is a civilian and works on post have special stickers on their cars. I'm sure this is a question presented a lot by people, obviously this is a security issue so you'd think they'd put more thought into it.
post #32 of 517
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatieJD View Post
DH and I were talking about this last night and really couldn't come up with any plausible reasons why there aren't tighter restrictions. Even people whose spouse is a civilian and works on post have special stickers on their cars. I'm sure this is a question presented a lot by people, obviously this is a security issue so you'd think they'd put more thought into it.
Yeah, that's why I was wondering why a civilian without military business would even be going on base. Seems they really should do something about that. What's the point in having a military base with a gate and all if it's not restricted?

In HI all the beaches are supposed to be public so, technically, anyone is supposed to have access to the beaches on K Bay even without a military sponsor. Going to the beach at K Bay to surf is a valid reason for a civilian to want access, though. I'm not sure if they actually followed that law, though. I remember discussing it with some people while we were there and there was disagreement about whether or not you could get on the base without a sponsor.
post #33 of 517
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatieJD View Post
Welcome to you both!

Military life with kids is interesting. A lot of it depends on your outlook and coping skills. In can be difficult, you often play the role of both parents a lot of the time in the physical sense. You wear many different hats. As far as children are concerned, I think they can develop a lot of resilience and independence due to the uniqueness of the experience. They can learn to adapt quickly to change, not all do, but I think many can. As my DH puts it as a former Army brat, kids in the military are either really outgoing or they don't adapt well at all. You have the opportunity to move often, so new experiences are a plus. It really can go several different ways, not all of them good, but for us through the good and the bad I think we've learned to appreciate the small things and the importance of a close bond and togetherness.
Quote:
I think the most important thing in the military life is to be flexible. Things can change in a moment and many times you have no choice or control so you have to accept it.
Thanks for the insight! My youngest is pretty resilient, while my oldest doesn't do change well, though, DC has gotten way better and is much more flexible and loves to travel and visit new places now. My biggest concern is not knowing how me or my DC would react with him when he firsts leaves for boot camp/school or his first deployment. I guess it's time to start coming up with ideas to help my DC cope.

So, what are the things you like about military life?
post #34 of 517
Each one of my kids behaves differently when dh comes and goes. We all go through a 2 week adjustment period at the beginning and end of each absence. Then we usually hit a stride where everything goes relatively smoothly as long as I can keep myself going. It's important to keep in mind that any odd or difficult behavior is most likely a result of Dad being gone rather than just defiance or being bad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by madis81 View Post
So, what are the things you like about military life?
I like that I don't have to work outside the home. I can stay home with my LOs. I like that we get to see/live in places we might not otherwise. I seriously doubt I ever would've lived in Hawaii (very unlikely I would've even visited) if my dh weren't in the military. We haven't been to a foreign country yet because I don't want to go while my kids are still so young but it's something to look forward to in the future.
post #35 of 517
Thread Starter 
Short separations are good practice. Work on getting yourselves into a routine (more strict than MDC standards, at least at my house). That seems to help kids adjust much more easily and makes life easier. Getting out of the house and keeping busy is crucial. You will find what works for you

What do I like about military life? It's really hard for me to weigh the costs and benefits. At this juncture I would be selfish if I said the benefits don't outweigh the costs because so many people are out of work and can't provide for their families. The sense of community is nice, I like traveling and visiting new places. Job security is good, and the benefits are good, like having housing and healthcare.
post #36 of 517
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarineWife View Post

I like that I don't have to work outside the home. I can stay home with my LOs. I like that we get to see/live in places we might not otherwise. I seriously doubt I ever would've lived in Hawaii (very unlikely I would've even visited) if my dh weren't in the military. We haven't been to a foreign country yet because I don't want to go while my kids are still so young but it's something to look forward to in the future.
Oh yeah, this too for sure.
post #37 of 517
I remembered the other thing I like about military life. I like the sense of accomplishment (that's not quite the right word but I can't think of another atm) it gives my dh. He truly feels that he is doing something important, making a difference for the better in the world.
post #38 of 517
[QUOTE=MarineWife;15148261]Yeah, that's why I was wondering why a civilian without military business would even be going on base. Seems they really should do something about that. What's the point in having a military base with a gate and all if it's not restricted?

Before Phil and I were married I was able to get on post easily. I would just go to the visitors desk say "I'm going to see a friend" (didn't even have to give a name but did have to say what building) and show them vehicle registration, insurance and my driver's license. Food delivery people come on post all the time, too. I guess it's a bit safer since you at least have to give your name/vehicle info, but that stuff could be fairly easily faked, I'd imagine.
post #39 of 517
Thread Starter 
It's even worse where I live, it's military housing but not on Fort Bragg. All you have to do is flash any ID when you come through, no car inspection or anything. At least for part of the day no one is even at the gate, cars just drive through. Last year or the year before there were several attempted kidnappings, don't think they ever caught who did it.
post #40 of 517
Wow! Although, I can understand not requiring a sponsor to go to the housing if the housing isn't on the actual base. It's not their job to protect families. I just think they'd do more to protect military buildings and equipment so that, if the housing is contained on the base, it would have restricted access, too.

I remembered the word I was thinking of for how my dh feels about his work; fulfillment.
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